ITU releases annual global ICT data and ICT Development Index country rankings

ITU – The Measuring the Information Society Report is widely recognized as the repository of the world’s most reliable and impartial global data and analysis on the state of global ICT development and is extensively relied upon by governments, international organizations, development banks and private sector analysts and investors worldwide.

“To bring more people online, it is important to focus on reducing overall socio-economic inequalities,” said ITU Secretary-General Houlin Zhao. “Education and income levels are strong determinants of whether or not people use the Internet.”

An increasingly ubiquitous, open, fast and content-rich Internet has changed the way many people live, communicate, and do business, delivering great benefits for people, governments, organizations and the private sector. However, many people are still not using the Internet, and many users do not fully benefit from its potential.

  • Most people have access to Internet services but many do not actually use them.
  • The full potential of the Internet remains untapped.
  • Access to the Internet is not enough; policy-makers must address broader socio-economic inequalities and help people acquire the necessary skills to take full advantage of the Internet.
  • Many people still do not own or use a mobile phone.
  • Affordability is the main barrier to mobile-phone ownership.
  • Asia and the Pacific has the lowest average purchasing power parity (PPP) $ price for mobile-cellular services of all regions.
  • Fixed-broadband prices continued to drop significantly in 2015 but remain high – and clearly unaffordable – in a number of LDCs.
  • Mobile-broadband is cheaper and more widely available than fixed-broadband, but still not deployed in the majority of LDCs (Least Developed Countries).
READ  IBM's nanophotonic tech integrates optic data right into chips

Mobile phone adoption has largely been monitored based on mobile-cellular subscription data since these are widely available and regularly collected and disseminated by regulators and operators.

At the end of 2016, there are almost as many mobile-cellular subscriptions as people on earth and 95% of the global population lives in an area that is covered by a mobile-cellular signal. However, since many people have multiple subscriptions or devices, other metrics need to be produced to accurately assess mobile uptake, such as the number of mobile phone users or mobile phone owners. more> https://goo.gl/L3Nh90

Related>

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *