Daily Archives: April 27, 2018

Enlightenment rationality is not enough: we need a new Romanticism | Aeon Ideas

BOOK REVIEW

Enlightenment Now, Author: Steven Pinker.
Modern Prometheus: Editing the Human Genome with Crispr-Cas9, Author: Jim Kozubek.
The Will to Knowledge, Author: Michel Foucault.

By Jim Kozubek – Progress creates the illusion that we are moving toward deeper knowledge when, in fact, imperfect theories constantly lead us astray.

The conflict is relevant in this age of anti-science, with far-Right activists questioning climate change, evolution and other current finds. But is that really bad? Nineteenth-century Romanticism was the first movement to take on the Enlightenment – and we still see its effects in such areas as environmentalism, asceticism and the ethical exercise of conscience.

In our new era of Enlightenment, we need Romanticism again.

With science becoming a brutal game of market forces and patent controls, the skeptics and Romantics among us must weigh in, and we already are. In one study that provides free genome sequencing for newborns, only 7 per cent of parents wanted to take part, suggesting that the public is cautious about how data might be abused by insurers, business and government.

Pinker’s solution to the distortion is investing science with secular humanism, an elastic concept of goodness that plies against financial pressures. But can we depend on technologists for such a benevolent spirit?

Right now, in biotech, only the market rules.

Modern-day Romantics have a right to be concerned about the motives of scientists, if not of science itself. more>

Updates from Ciena

Debunking 5 common myths about 5G
By Brian Lavallée – When 5G begins to roll out, it will likely start in a select group of countries like the United States, South Korea, China, Japan, and India. However, we won’t be saying goodbye to 4G anytime soon. The truth is, 5G was never intended to replace 4G, unlike 4G that was expected to replace 3G (but never really did). When 5G rolls out, 4G and its multiple variants will still play a key role in the network — particularly for less bandwidth-heavy applications and use cases.

This means operators need to plan for both 4G today and 5G tomorrow, as both will coexist and share same network resources for the foreseeable future.

There’s no doubt: higher download speeds are a big part of 5G and is what most people are most excited about but equally important is that 5G will offer up to 10 times lower latency than 4G. It is this combination of faster download speeds and reduced latency that opens up new use cases, such as augmented reality and virtual reality.

Since the 5G standards are not complete, there is no such thing as a “5G product” today. To get around this, some talk about having 4.5G (better than 4G, but not quite 5G) products that meet the current draft standards being proposed today. However, it is important to note; you can’t credibly make this claim because if you build something based on where the standards are now, there is still a chance the product won’t be able to adapt, such as via software upgrades, when standards are approved later. more>

Updates from Siemens

Program Lifecycle Management for Consumer Products & Retail

Siemens – The pace of innovation in the consumer products industry is constantly rising and driving a need for more flexible and collaborative tools based on best practices for project, program and lifecycle management. Companies expect solutions to connect processes, automate tasks and be intuitive for the broad audience of roles involved in their processes.

Taking an integrated approach is mandatory in today’s complicated and competitive market. Only by combining product lifecycle information with program and project management methodologies can the true operational potential of a company be unlocked.

Program lifecycle management is a methodology that provides a solution based on a collaboration platform. It addresses essential needs of the consumer product and retail industry, both in terms of offered functionality and flexibility. more>

The Failures of Globalism

BOOK REVIEW

Us Vs. Them: The Failure of Globalism, Author: Ian Bremmer.

By Gabrielle Levy – If the six and a half decades that followed the end of World War II were a triumph of globalism, an era of prosperity and peace as the world grew increasingly interconnected, the second decade of the 21st century has seen the rise of a new populism that has pushed back.

Convulsions of anger – at corrupt government elites, at the floods of refugees fleeing sectarian conflict, at the loss of jobs as workers are increasingly replaced by automation and artificial intelligence – culminated in the pair of 2016 events, Brexit and the election of Donald Trump as U.S. president, that turned conventional wisdom on its head.

The biggest piece, I think, has already happened. When globalism started, after World War II was over, the United States recognized that we never want to have a flight like that again, so we’ve got to do something about it. We’re going to rebuild our former enemies – the Germans, the Japanese – and we’re going to build the United Nations.

More broadly, as it continues, it’s going to be a lot of opposition to the United States sending troops fighting in other people’s battles, like we’ve seen in Afghanistan and Iraq and Syria. It’s going to be a lot less support for immigration into the U.S., unless you’ve got a skill set or a lot of money, and we’re already seeing that start to happen.

And it’s possibly going to lead to more trade disputes, certainly in terms of big technology, where, instead of having one global free market, we end up having much more fragmentation of a marketplace with more strategic sectors.

And some of that is because the United States is not willing to promote free multilateral trade organizations, but some of it is because the Chinese are building an alternative system that has no global free trade at all.

It’s all just going to be linked to Beijing. So when you put that all together, you start to see what the future of this world will look like.

Globalization can turn a virtuous cycle into a vicious one – where globalization improves people’s lives, only to raise their expectations. That, in turn, raises frustrations when those expectations are met.

In China, the growing middle class and the rising wages risk threatening the very economic engine – cheap labor – that made that progress possible. Can developing countries avoid this trap? more>