Monthly Archives: August 2018

Updates from datacenter.com

How Cloud Demand Positively Impacts further growth of Amsterdam
datacenter.com – As one of the top data center markets in the world, the Amsterdam area is poised for more growth over the coming years as cloud demand increases. The amount of data going through the cloud will reach 14.1 ZB by 2020.

After Microsoft opened their €2 billion campus, Google opened their data center in North of the Netherlands (Eemshaven) and the recently the announcement came that Google will expand with a second campus in The Netherlands (Amsterdam region). Other large cloud companies are expanding their supply in and around Amsterdam.

Datacenter.com opened Datacenter.com AMS1 in Amsterdam South-East this year, the best connected data center Campus, which will soon will upgrade to the second phase due to the fast growth and the high interest. more>

Updates from Chicago Booth

Actively managed, but more index-like
Chicago Booth – Analyzing 2,789 actively managed mutual funds between 1979 and 2014, the researchers find that fund portfolios have become more liquid over time, largely as a result of becoming more diversified. Both components of diversification—balance and coverage—have risen sharply, especially since 2000. The level of coverage rose faster than the level of balance as mutual-fund managers poured ever more names into their portfolios.

The research captures the rise of closet indexing among active-mutual-fund managers, a phenomenon that may be caused by managers hewing toward the benchmark they are trying to outperform. While diversification has some benefits in terms of risk management and liquidity, the close resemblance of active portfolios to passive indexes might leave some investors wondering why they’re bothering to pay for active management given the ubiquitous availability of cheap, passive alternatives. more>

Updates from Ciena

FlexE: 3 reasons network providers are interested
By Helen Xenos – FlexEthernet, or FlexE, is a client interface standard being defined by the OIF that allows for a variety of Ethernet MAC rates (10GbE, 40GbE, nx25GbE) that are decoupled from Ethernet PHY (physical interface) rates.

Wait, what?

You may have heard about FlexE and even read about operators trialing FlexE in their networks, but unless you are intimately involved with standards activities or Ethernet protocol implementation, translating FlexE to its resulting networking value may not be obvious. For most of us, it is only once you start to look at the drivers behind the development and dig into which of today’s challenges it solves, that you can determine whether FlexE is something that makes sense for your network. more>

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Updates from Siemens

Swiss furniture maker produces innovative seating and tables following Industry 4.0 concepts
Girsberger – Since Girsberger AG’s development of an infinite height adjustment mechanism for stools patented in 1910, the company has been turning out novel and often groundbreaking seating solutions. Since it was established as a wood turning shop in Zurich, Switzerland, in 1889, the furniture manufacturer has been producing innovative seating and tables with outstanding ergonomics, resilience and durability for offices as well as dining rooms.

To remain internationally competitive with this portfolio in a country such as Switzerland with its high infrastructure and labor costs as well as an adverse exchange rate is in itself quite a challenge.

“Combining sophisticated, original design and functionality with maximum practical benefits, we create tomorrow’s classics,” says Michael Girsberger. He is heading the Switzerland-based group with subsidiaries in the European Union and Turkey in the family’s fourth generation. “This requires an uncompromisingly honest use of materials as well as precision in manufacturing with high craftsmanship.” more>

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Updates from Siemens

Solutions for Semiconductor Equipment Product Lifecycle Management
Siemens – To be successful in the marketplace, semiconductor equipment companies must provide innovative semiconductor process solutions to chip makers at low cost and with leading-edge features, superior quality and reliability. The architectural elements of these process solutions are mechanical functions, electrical controls and software-driven electronics.

To keep up with the increasing complexity of these elements, diverse customer needs, and strong competition amid rapid technological change, semiconductor equipment makers must consistently and successfully invest in product and process research and development (R&D), and maximize the R&D productivity.

To increase R&D productivity and avoid wasteful investments, equipment makers must effectively collaborate with semiconductor ecosystem partners, such as foundries and chip makers. The equipment makers must reduce cost through smart sourcing or outsourcing in a global electronics supply chain. To tackle the product complexities, they must implement a modularized product development strategy based upon a common platform with a well-defined technology roadmap and interfaces. more>

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Updates from Georgia Tech

Neuroscientists Team with Engineers to Explore how the Brain Controls Movement
By Carol Clark – Scientists have made remarkable advances into recording the electrical activity that the nervous system uses to control complex skills, leading to insights into how the nervous system directs an animal’s behavior.

“We can record the electrical activity of a single neuron, and large groups of neurons, as animals learn and perform skilled behaviors,” says Samuel Sober, an associate professor of biology at Emory University who studies the brain and nervous system. “What’s missing,” he adds, “is the technology to precisely record the electrical signals of the muscles that ultimately control that movement.”

The Sober lab is now developing that technology through a collaboration with the lab of Muhannad Bakir, a professor in Georgia Tech’s School of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

The technology will be used to help understand the neural control of many different skilled behaviors to potentially gain insights into neurological disorders that affect motor control.

“By combining expertise in the life sciences at Emory with the engineering expertise of Georgia Tech, we are able to enter new scientific territory,” Bakir says. “The ultimate goal is to make discoveries that improve the quality of life of people.” more>

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Updates from Ciena

New Cignal AI report looks at past, present and future of coherent technology
By Kacie Levy – Cignal AI has published a new report, “Tracking the Deployment of Third Generation Coherent.”

Today’s third generation coherent has already arrived in the form of single-wavelength 400G-capable technology designed to keep pace with the tremendous pace of data growth. As one example, Equinix has forecast that by 2020, interconnect bandwidth will grow up to 5,000 Tb/s, with double-digit growth rates.

This Cignal AI report shows that the transition to third generation coherent technology is underway, and its effects are being felt throughout the optical market. more>

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Updates from ITU

Autonomous shipping is making waves
By Kirsten Salyer – The autonomous shipping industry is making waves, as established companies and tech start-ups apply emerging technologies to one of the oldest industries in the world, maritime transport.

With about 90% of the world’s trade carried by sea and ships among the largest contributors to carbon dioxide emissions, autonomous shipping efforts could also support United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goal 7, Affordable and Clean Energy.

Developments in autonomous shipping, such as those that allow ships to deal with weather and currents more efficiently, can lead to fuel savings and fewer emissions, says Päivi Haikkola, Ecosystem Lead of ONE SEA – Autonomous Maritime Ecosystem, a collaboration of experts whose aim is to encourage the creation of an operating autonomous maritime ecosystem by 2025. more>

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Investing in People to Build Human Capital

World Bank – Scientific and technological advances are transforming lives: they are even helping poorer countries close the gap with rich countries in life expectancy. But, poorer countries still face tremendous challenges, as almost a quarter of children under five are malnourished, and 60 percent of primary school students are failing to achieve even a rudimentary education.

In fact, more than 260 million children and youth in poorer countries are receiving no education at all.

“Human capital” – the potential of individuals – is going to be the most important long-term investment any country can make for its people’s future prosperity and quality of life.

In many countries, the workforce is unprepared for the future that is fast unfolding.

This is a key insight from the World Bank’s forthcoming World Development Report 2019: The Changing Nature of Work. The frontier for skills is moving faster than ever before. Countries need to gear up now to prepare their workforces for the tremendous challenges and opportunities that are being driven by technological change. more>

How evil happens

BOOK REVIEW

Passions and Tempers: A History of the Humours, Author: Noga Arikha.
Eichmann in Jerusalem, Author: Hannah Arendt.
The Science of Evil: On Empathy and the Origins of Cruelty, Author: Simon Baron-Cohen.
Home Fire, Author: Kamila Shamsie.

By Noga Arikha – The ‘sapiens’ in Homo sapiens does not fully describe our species: we are as violent as we are smart.

This might be why we are the only Homo genus left over in the first place, and why we have been so destructively successful at dominating our planet. But still the question nags away: how are ordinary people capable of such obscene acts of violence?

Today, biology is a powerful explanatory force for much human behavior, though it alone cannot account for horror. Much as the neurosciences are an exciting new tool for human self-understanding, they will not explain away our brutishness. Causal accounts of the destruction that humans inflict on each other are best provided by political history – not science, nor metaphysics. The past century alone is heavy with atrocities of unfathomable scale, albeit fathomable political genesis.

The social neuroscientist Tania Singer at the Max Planck Institute in Leipzig in Germany defines empathy as the ability to ‘resonate’ with the feelings of the other. It develops from babyhood on – as imitation at first, then joint attention – into the ability to adopt the point of view of another, along with a shift in spatial perception from self to other, as if one were literally stepping into another’s shoes.

This requires an ability to distinguish between self and other in the first place, an aspect of the so-called ‘theory of mind’ that one acquires over the first five years of life.

But while empathy ensures the cohesion of a group or a society, it is also biased and parochial. Revenge thrives on it. more>

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