Daily Archives: April 2, 2019

Updates from Ciena

The benefits of an integrated C&L-band photonic line system
Network providers are looking for new alternatives to unlock additional network capacity. Ciena’s Kent Jordan explains how upgrading to the L-band can help – if done in the right way.
By Kent Jordan – The photonic layer is the foundation for high capacity networks. Whether the network application is to increase connectivity between data centers, deliver bandwidth-intensive content, or to move business applications into the cloud, the photonic layer provides the mechanism to efficiently light the fiber by assigning and routing wavelengths across the optical spectrum. However, today’s photonic layer systems utilize only a portion of the usable spectrum within the fiber, and operators are increasingly looking at expansion into the L-band to increase capacity.

There are a few factors driving the desire for L-band. First, and foremost, is traffic demand. Networks with high bandwidth applications and sustained bandwidth growth are quickly faced with capacity exhaustion. Once existing capacity is consumed, lighting additional fiber pairs is required. If the cost of laying or leasing new fiber is too prohibitive, then alternatives to unlocking additional capacity are needed.

The L-band is one such solution, and it can be used to double the fiber capacity. But, for operators to consider deploying L-band solutions, they must be simple to plan and deploy, and the upgrade to L-band must not impact existing traffic in the C-band.

Building the foundation for a scalable network infrastructure isn’t just about knowing what building blocks to use. It also includes selecting the appropriate architecture and understanding how the pieces fit together, so when it is time to increase capacity, there aren’t any surprises, performance hits, or suboptimal capacity limits. more>

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Updates from Chicago Booth

How local productivity growth affects workers near and far
One city’s boom can be felt across a nation
Chicago Booth – When big cities experience an economic boom, you expect an upsurge in wages and growth in those areas. But there’s some nuance: according to Chicago Booth’s Richard Hornbeck and University of California at Berkeley’s Enrico Moretti, one area’s surge particularly benefits low-skilled workers locally—and high-skilled workers elsewhere.

Using total factor productivity (TFP) as a measure of local productivity growth, Hornbeck Amount and Moretti analyzed two decades of data from major US cities to quantify the direct effects on people living in booming cities and the indirect effects on people elsewhere. Allowing for trade-offs between salary and cost-of-living increases, as well as unequal distribution of benefits across different groups, the researchers find that low-skilled workers gained the most from local productivity growth.

But gains extended further afield: a boom in San Diego or Los Angeles, say, was also felt in other cities. And high-skilled workers gained more from productivity growth in other cities. more>

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Updates from Siemens

Perceptible differences that drive top-line growth
Siemens – 150 million times a day…

…someone, somewhere in the world, chooses a Unilever product.

Unilever’s brand portfolio spans 14 categories of home, personal care and food products and includes world favorites such as Lipton, Knorr, Dove and Omo. The company employs 179,000 people in 100 countries worldwide. Its products are sold in the Americas, Europe and Asia/Africa in roughly equal distribution.

Innovation is critical to sustaining Unilever’s growth. “We see product innovation as one of the key drivers of top-line growth,” says Huw Evans, R&D director of information in Unilever’s Home and Personal Care Division. Unilever defines product innovation this way:

“Product innovation means providing the consumer with a product that delivers a perceivable benefit that is differentiated from those of our competitors and that differentiation drives the choice to purchase and use that product,” explains Evans.

“You can change products to improve their price differentials, for example, but if the consumer is not really experiencing a difference, then we wouldn’t classify that as innovation. Innovation is about consumer-perceptible benefits that drive choice. To help achieve this Unilever invests €1 billion every year in research and development, which includes support for five major laboratories around the world that explore new thinking and techniques to help develop our products.” more>

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Updates from Datacenter.com

The staffing challenge in data center market becomes a quality opportunity
The data center industry is growing rapidly. The amount of vacancies for specialized data center personnel in the area of Amsterdam, for example, is rising. A shortage of specialized/skilled data center personnel is expected, a staffing challenge. How can the data center market respond? Will it result in decreasing quality of data center services? We believe in the opportunity of improving!

datacenter.com – It is expected that the data center industry will rapidly grow and will result in a shortage of skilled IT personnel.

Almost all data centers have plans to expand and cloud providers are considering or starting to operate their own data center. So, the amount of companies and the size of the companies are expanding, means that specialists are needed to design, maintain and operate these high-tech buildings and services. The employees that are the hardest to find are ones with a very broad knowledge of power, cooling and construction knowledge. Due to the shortage in the skilled employees, the more expensive the employees will be.

Instead of trying to do everything by yourself, you can use the experts. The companies that build technical infrastructures and buildings are the once that (mostly) have in-depth knowledge within their field of expertise. Instead of engineering your data center with some multi-talent employees and asking the experts to fill-in the blanks, the experts can design and a project manager within the field can connect them. more>

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