Challenges for international institutions during COVID 19

By Erol User – International institutions still represent a compromise between the power capabilities of their participants and the need for relative civilizational interaction between them. Institutions cannot be effective or on their own. It always depends on the ability of states to agree and the presence of objective structural prerequisites.

In the latter half of April, disputes between China and the United States led to the disruption of a tele-meeting by the G20 countries.

Due to the fact that this grouping is considered the most representative and, at the same time, the least binding in terms of decision-making, until recently it was considered the most promising in the context of a crumbling world order and the growth of national egoism.

However, the first round of the most important interstate confrontation of the new era already called into question the very possibility of discussions between the leaders of the 20 most economically and politically important countries of the world. Somewhat earlier, the US government announced that it plans to stop funding the World Health Organisation, where it is the main donor. Washington does not like much at the WHO. But the main thing is that China has so far been able to exert more influence on its work than the United States itself. Donald Trump is trying to correct this imbalance in the ways characteristic of his policymaking. The result is not yet obvious.

Such course of events makes more than relevant the question of the future of international institutions, the most important achievement of international politics in the 20th century.

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Mankind went without constant norms and rules for most of its political history. Since the formation of the first states, collectives of individuals have reflected nothing but their own conscience and the strength of other collectives in their actions. In Europe, the role of arbiter was for a short time, less than 1,000 years, played by the Catholic potentate in Rome. The church did not have its own armies, but it did have moral authority. Moreover, the popes’ lack of their own military power, as well as their claim to the universality of spiritual power, did not allow the Holy See to become one of the ordinary states.

Accordingly, the values ​​and rules that Rome tried to impose during the Middle Ages did not directly express anyone’s values ​​or interests. Therefore, they were relatively fair, for the most part. At the beginning of the 16th century, European states became so strong that they became nonplussed with the power of Rome. Over the next 400 years, they lived practically without any institutions embodying the need to follow the rules. As a result of the Thirty Years’ War of 1618 – 1648, at least general rules of conduct appeared, therefore Kissinger in his book World Order defined the Westphalian system as “having not a substantive, but a procedural character.” This was a great achievement for its time, but it was far from an attempt to establish genuine, civilized relations between peoples. more>

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