Updates from McKinsey

Energizing industrial manufacturing through active performance management
A new approach can help industrials gain greater visibility into performance and capture lasting gains.
By Ryan Fletcher, Kairat Kasymaliev, Abhijit Mahindroo, and Nick Santhanam – Along with its severe human toll, the spread of the coronavirus has exacerbated long-standing challenges in businesses worldwide. For industrial companies—especially those with high-mix, low-volume manufacturing—COVID-19 has increased the already-widespread problems with shop-floor productivity. As supply-chain disruptions affect shipment of critical parts, industrials are struggling to meet their promised customer delivery dates. Within plants, physical-distancing requirements and line closures are disturbing some workflows. These delays often prevent industrials from delivering critical products, including sanitization tools and other equipment to help their customers both fight and recover from the pandemic.

For many years, industrials have deployed lean levers and performance-management initiatives to improve productivity and expand margins. They usually achieved good initial results, but their gains frequently vanished or decreased as managers became distracted and employees returned to their old ways. Some industrials have also offshored production to reduce costs but then encountered substantial challenges and high start-up costs when they tried to replicate their capabilities and skills in new locations. With recent tariffs and travel disruptions creating unprecedented uncertainty, more businesses are considering reshoring production to increase their resilience and flexibility in the “next normal.” That makes manufacturing performance even more important.

A new approach to productivity—active performance management (APM)—may be more likely to deliver lasting gains than previous methods. It focuses on three areas where most current solutions fall short: real-time performance visibility, daily performance planning, and end-to-end accountability. When high-mix, low-volume industrials incorporate APM into their standard workflows, they typically improve productivity by 30 to 50 percent within eight to 12 weeks of deployment while simultaneously increasing on-time deliveries and unlocking additional capacity.

READ  Updates from Ciena

Surprisingly, many high-mix, low-volume manufacturing operations lack real-time visibility into performance. Instead, they review key performance indicators (KPIs) weekly or even monthly. This frequency may be enough to drive performance in high-volume environments, where variability is low and processes are predictable, but it is not well suited to the complexity of a high-mix factory.

Without real-time transparency, supervisors are unlikely to discuss and address issues until their impact has snowballed. more>

Related>

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *