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The Future Is Now
By Laura Staugaitis – Dramatic, intriguing, thoughtful, and beautiful: Seoul-based creative Giseok Cho crafts powerful images, but he says he doesn’t consider his photographs to be art. “I think I’m doing it to express beauty from my perspective,” he says. The photographer builds careful compositions filled with rich colors and luxurious textures that surround solitary figures. His mysterious portraits blur boundaries of time, culture, and gender, leaving the viewer to wonder about the worlds his ephemeral characters come from—what moments have just passed, or are about to arrive.

When asked about how he wants viewers to relate to the characters in his photographs, Cho counters that he doesn’t necessarily have goals like that in mind. “I just want to do what I want, and want people to think that person does his thing.” Rather than making individual statements about his subjects, Cho prefers to keep his imagery more conceptually high-level, reflecting the complexities of Korean culture, the fickleness of fashion, and the ambiguity of beauty.

The photographer’s carefully staged portraits draw on his background in the fashion industry. Cho has worked as a graphic designer, set designer, and art director, crafting imagined worlds to bring Korean fashion to life. He continues to use fashion as a powerful means of expression, taking advantage of the ever-changing aesthetics. “Fashion has so much to offer to express beauty, and it’s dynamic, so there’s a lot of variety. It’s fun for me.” more>

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