Daily Archives: September 23, 2021

Updates from McKinsey

A first step to racial equality? “Fundamentally improve job quality.”
MCKINSEY GLOBAL INSTITUTE – JP Julien was nine-years-old when he learned that place matters.

Now an associate partner, JP co-leads our Institute for Black Economic Mobility and led the research for The economic state of Black America: What it is and what it could be. In 1998, he and his Trinidadian American family of six moved from a low-income town in New Jersey to nearby Bloomfield. The 15 miles in between made a world of difference to his life.

Twenty percent of his first town’s residents lived below the poverty line at the time. The grocery store was a 20-minute drive away, and there were few nearby parks or playgrounds. “My mom took two buses to commute to work in New York City every day—sometimes 90 minutes one way,” he recalls.

Several years later, the family moved to Bloomfield, NJ, about a 20-minute drive away on the Garden State Parkway. “I remember the first day we moved in,” he says. “We had our own backyard, a bank on the corner, a diner a block away. My mom’s commuter train stop was a five-minute walk. My parents let me ride my bike throughout the neighborhood.”

“In third grade,” he adds, “I realized for the first time how important place was in shaping opportunity and your life. And so this research resonated with me on a very personal level.” more>

Updates from Chicago Booth

Leading through Unprecedented Times
By Claire Zulkey – Classes for the 2021–22 school year don’t formally begin until September 27, but 40 second-year, Full-Time MBA students arrived on campus shortly after Labor Day to prepare for their role as LEAD facilitators. One of the first experiential MBA leadership development courses at a major business school, LEAD is an integral component of all MBA programs at Booth, with varied formats for Full-Time, Evening, Weekend, and Executive MBA cohorts. All first-year Booth students participate in LEAD, but only a select group of them come back as facilitators their second year to help mentor incoming students.

Traditionally, LEAD is conducted entirely in-person, and even includes an overnight trip to Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, where students participate in ropes courses, improv, scavenger hunts, ultimate frisbee, and other activities that foster collaboration, creativity, and camaraderie. Last year’s programming faced the challenge of moving online due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Even virtually, many first-year students gained valuable experience through the LEAD program, and were inspired to come back as LEAD facilitators this year. That includes Peter McNally, who recently completed a summer internship with the Boston Consulting Group. Prior to Booth, he built a research and consulting organization at the University of Pennsylvania focused on social issues around the globe.

“Last year’s LEAD facilitators did a good job making it feel welcoming. They brought a lot of enthusiasm and made it feel like this is a warm, positive space,” McNally says of his eight-person squad of other first-year students. “That’s easier said than done on Zoom.” He refers to each squad as “this little family.” He continues, “I’m not sure if this is something unique to Booth, but there’s a positive sense of competition: we want our cohort to be the happiest, the most welcoming.” more>

An Open Letter from the Digital Interface Standards Working Group to the SATCOM Industry

An Open Letter from the Digital Interface Standards Working Group to the SATCOM Industry urging the development of an open standard to replace L-band IF, paving the way for interoperability, improved performance and costs.

Twenty years ago, our industry undertook a major transition from 70MHz IF to L-Band IF to improve earth station reliability and reduce complexity. Today, we are embarking on the next radical transition from L-band to a fully digitalized interface. The development of an open standard will enable us to deliver the most advantages at the lowest cost, allowing all manufacturers to build interoperable technologies that work in both open and closed network topologies. The Digital Interface Standards Working Group (DIS) is pleased to announce the work that has been completed to date and our desire to open the Working Group to participation by a larger portion of the SATCOM industry.

Along with increased demand for higher throughputs and the availability of more satellite bandwidth comes the need to deploy and manage networks on a much larger scale. We aim to utilize the available bandwidth more flexibly and enable the use of higher-order modulations to improve bandwidth efficiency. The currently available technologies in the SATCOM industry have reached a point at which the traditional analog L-Band modem to RF interface is impeding realization of these goals.

Leveraging the latest virtualization, cloud computing and network function virtualization technologies, we can improve the performance and scale of satellite hub, gateway and modem equipment with this open standard. Digital signal processing techniques and hardware have advanced to levels at which amplifier impairments such as distortion and gain ripple can be substantially mitigated. Coupling a digital signal representation of the modem Transmit (TX) output and Receive (RX) input to modern frequency conversion techniques will allow flexible mapping of signals onto a multi-GHz RF spectrum allocation without requiring a multi-octave analog IF signal or an arbitrary segmentation of the RF bandwidth. All of these potential improvements to operation and performance can be enabled by a digital modem-to-RF equipment interface. more>

How Carbon Farming Can Help Save the Earth

Regenerative farming can help boost crop yields and fight climate change, and one nonprofit plans to incentivize more farmers to make the switch.
Morgan Stanley – Starting in late 2018, Al Gore’s Caney Fork Farms in Carthage, Tenn. started a research collaboration and gathered a group of scientists to tackle a challenge: Figure out how to use the earth itself to fight climate change by creating a systematic, scalable approach for farmers to better use soil to capture carbon and reduce greenhouse gas emissions that fuel global warming, while also boosting crop yields and profitability.

Two of those scientists who took up the gauntlet were Dr. Bruno Basso, a professor in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Michigan State University’s College of Natural Science, and Dr. Kristofer Covey, an assistant professor of Environmental Studies and Sciences at Skidmore College. They went on to cofound My Soil Organic Carbon, or MySOC, a nonprofit that aims to create a database of soil carbon for farmland across the U.S., while providing farmers with low-cost tools to collect and analyze their soil samples for crop production and carbon sequestration farming, while modeling prospects for more profitability.

By giving farmers access to standardized data from their own farms and those of their peers, MySOC aims to persuade more food producers to choose regenerative-agriculture methods that can help the world attain net-zero greenhouse gas emissions, vs. more carbon-intensive traditional techniques. MySOC is also an inaugural member of the Morgan Stanley Institute for Sustainable Investing’s Sustainable Solutions Collaborative, an initiative that helps scale sustainability innovations that can benefit from partnerships across private and public industries. more>