Category Archives: Broadband

My Fair Data: How the Government Can Limit Bias in Artificial Intelligence

By Josh Sullivan, Josh Elliot, Kirsten Lloyd, and Edward Raff –
The rapid development of artificial intelligence (AI) holds great promise, but also potential for pitfalls. AI can change the way we live, work, and play, accelerate drug discoveries, and drive edge computing and autonomous systems. It also has the potential to transform global politics, economies, and cultures in such profound ways that the U.S. and other countries are set to enter what some speculate may be the next Space Race.

We are just beginning to understand the implications of unchecked AI. Recent headlines have highlighted its limitations and the continued need for human control. We will not be able to ignore the range of ethical risks posed by issues of privacy, transparency, safety, control, and bias.

Considering the advances already made in AI—and those yet to be made—AI is undoubtedly on a trajectory toward integration into every aspect of our lives. As we prepare to turn an increasing share of tasks and decision-making over to AI we must think more critically about how ethics factor into AI design to minimize risk. With this in mind, policymakers must proactively consider ways to incorporate ethics into AI practices and design incentives that promote innovation while ensuring AI operates with our best interests in mind. more>

Updates from ITU

World Space Week – ITU’s contribution to a world united by space
By Alexandre Vallet – This year’s theme of World Space Week, “Space Unites the World,” resounds with the never-ending work carried out by the entire ITU membership since the 1960s to ensure that adequate radio frequencies are available for space activities.

Only six years after the historical first satellite launch of Sputnik in 1957, ITU organized the Extraordinary Administrative Radio Conference to allocate frequency bands for space radiocommunication purposes in Geneva from 7 October to 8 November 1963.

The Conference, which was attended by more than 400 delegates from 70 ITU Member States, allocated for the first time radio frequencies for outer space activities, totaling about 6 GHz for the various kinds of space services and for radio astronomy, 2.8 GHz of which were for communication satellites. After the Conference, about 15 per cent of the Table of Frequency Allocations was available for outer space. more>

Updates from Ciena

4 ways an Adaptive Network can overcome today’s challenges and take your network to the next level
By Françoise Pouliquen – There is a relentless push-pull from rapid business and technology change affecting operators today. On one hand, dramatic growth in subscriber demands are driving fronthaul and backhaul traffic and putting networks under intense pressure. While on the other, there’s an industry wide race to develop and commercialize new revenue-generating services, such as IoT use cases and 5G mobile services – and to implement the network technologies and architectures needed to support and deliver them. On top of that, new market entrants, including some of the largest internet companies, are deploying massive-scale network connections that support low-cost data transport between key locations and data centers with unrivalled economies of scale.

The challenges for operators are; how to take exponential traffic growth in stride; how to prepare the network for the next-generation of IoT and 5G use cases; and how to remain competitive on price with large connectivity providers in the market.

Here are four key ways an Adaptive Network can help:

  • Increasing network agility and efficiency
  • Future-proofing the network with industry leading packet-optical solutions
  • Helping avoid vendor lock-in with open networking
  • Driving network innovation in strategic partnership

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5 Tips for Building Fog Networks

By Chuck Byers – Fog computing was conceived as a way to enable applications in high-throughput, high-compute ecosystems that require real-time processing. In the world of the Internet of Things, fog is already supporting deployments on a global scale.

The OpenFog Consortium defines fog computing as: “A horizontal, system-level architecture that distributes computing, storage, control and networking functions closer to the users along a Cloud-to-Thing continuum.”

In IoT, for example, applications are sometimes difficult to predict or pin down. It is often helpful to define the application space of a network or network element in terms of a three-layer taxonomy of the vertical market served, the use cases in those verticals and the specific applications within those use cases.

Fog nodes are fundamental processing elements that enable high-compute operations in close proximity to end nodes. Fog nodes may serve multiple verticals, use cases or applications in an efficient, combined network. Once these high-level requirements are well understood, the design of the network and its elements can commence. more>

Updates from Adobe

BRIT(ISH): Visualizing the UK with Type
By Isabel Lea – I’ve always believed the role of a designer to be like that of a translator. For as long as I can remember, I’ve been obsessed with words and languages, and so I’ve naturally gravitated towards a kind of design that allows me to translate these things from the written to the visual, bringing them to life.

As the first Adobe Creative Resident based in the United Kingdom, I’ve been afforded the opportunity to spend a year visualizing culture and language in our everyday lives through design. BRIT(ISH) is my starting project for the residency. The project is an attempt to explore insights and ideas about being young and British during this turbulent time. I aimed to visualize often-intangible emotions in a playful way that other people can understand. Each object in the collection directly responds to quotations, insights, and stories I collected from the environment around me in the UK.

For me, projects that respond to stories and insights are often the most interesting because they add a level of unpredictability to the process and can result in something much more authentic. more>

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In the future, you’ll never have to leave your neighborhood

By Layla McCay – In the city’s center, people stroll in landscaped gardens, enjoying the positive impact of nature, exercise, and socialization on their mental health and well-being. But for those living on the outskirts, that epicenter can feel distant, separated by slashes of motorways.

Public transportation often points inward in a spoke-and-wheel configuration, emphasizing that there is just one truly desirable destination. People of the peripheries must commute back and forth, below ground and along highways, on trains and buses, losing time for friends and family, relaxation, leisure, culture, and sports. The fable of city life is out of reach, lost in the sprawl.

Instead of focusing on city centers, we should reconfigure the infrastructure of the outskirts. The result could see the end of such epicenters: a future where we identify as much with our hyper-local neighborhoods as we do with the greater metropolis.

We can see this in the growing trend of placemaking. This is a planning and design approach that works with communities to understand, imagine, and deliver solutions that meet their local needs, rather than relying on the whims of a grand city plan. more>

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Updates from Autodesk

GTXRaster CAD Series: Incorporated into “Full” AutoCAD
GTX – With over 34 years in the Technical Imaging industry, GTX has provided engineering professionals the best Windows® based products in the market to accommodate scanned paper drawings – black and white or color images. GTX will significantly enhance your ability to handle scanned drawings, maps and other raster images and bring them into your modern CAD, EDM or GIS environments.

These new product releases, the GTXRaster CAD 2019 Series*, known as the “AutoCAD for raster” and the windows standalone, GTXImage CAD™ Version 21 Series, are a unique, cost-effective solution for bringing legacy drawings into your digital environment. You can modify and enhance scanned raster archives with the speed and flexibility of both raster and vector editing techniques. Whether your requirement is for raster cleanup, 2D CAD drafting, hybrid raster/vector editing or full automatic raster-to-vector conversion with intelligent text recognition, total flexibility is provided by these product series. more>

Updates from Autodesk

PolyTrans|CAD+DCC+Animation Pro 3D Translation System
Okino – Now in its third decade of development, PolyTrans|CAD is used by tens of thousands of production studios and professional 3D users to cross convert crack-free and render-perfect BREP solids CAD models (in native formats, not reverse engineered secondary CAD formats), and all skinning + animation data, between 3ds Max, Maya, LightWave, CINEMA 4D and all major downstream file formats ranging from COLLADA to Wavefront OBJ and dozens more.

It is now commonplace, via the widespread use of PolyTrans|CAD, to use Autodesk 3ds Max and Maya to create product brochures, technical documentation and presentation materials of CAD data. PolyTrans|CAD allows all disparate departments of companies (such as engineering, design, marketing and support), and animation production companies alike, to easily exchange and re-use product data without the need to rebuild their 3D datasets. more>

Updates from Siemens

Digital Enterprise Industry Solutions for Automotive OEMs
Siemens – Automotive OEMs are remaking themselves in an era of digital disruptions across the industry. Product complexity, technological change, and increasing competition places pressure on OEMs to innovate faster. Leading automakers are increasingly using systems engineering processes that span the domains of mechanical, electrical and software functions to realize the innovation needed for next-gen cars.

Siemens PLM Software solutions are built on open standards to allow for seamless integration across disciplines. This gives automakers the flexibility to digitalize product development, enabling everyone to access a car’s digital twin. more>

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Updates from ITU

Advocacy Target 4: Digital Skills & Literacy
ITU – Effective education systems are essential for meeting future challenges and delivering on the SDGs. Although rapid technological change has taken place over the last thirty years, education systems in many countries have remained largely unchanged over the last century. Education is about much more than merely providing people with the skills and knowledge to work, and must create a framework through which people can lead diverse and fulfilling lives. People of all ages should have opportunities to learn about their own cultures, in their own languages.

There is broad agreement that education needs to ensure that people gain four main skills: creativity, communication, collaboration, and critical thinking. Alongside skills such as literacy and numeracy, people should now also gain basic digital skills. They need to have a comprehensive understanding of the rapidly changing world in which they live, as well as their roles and responsibilities within it. ITU’s Global ICT Development Index (IDI) includes a measure of digital skills and capabilities.

There is considerable debate as to what proficiency in digital skills and an ‘adequate’ level really mean. Digital skills have been broken down into three categories:

  1. the basic digital literacy needed for all workers, consumers and citizens in a digital society;
  2. the advanced ICT skills (coding, computer science and engineering) which are needed to develop innovative ICT products and services; and
  3. e-business skills or the specific know-how needed for digital entrepreneurshipn. Figure 15 shows how global averages for digital skills vary from 5.2% (using a programming language) to 43.7% (transferring files).

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