Category Archives: Communication industry

Updates from ITU

New Measuring the Information Society Report 2018 shows big progress, big gaps
ITU News – More and more people worldwide have access to and are using the Internet. At the same time, ICT prices have dropped globally in the last decade. However, stronger information and communication technology (ICT) skills are needed to connect people everywhere.

These are some of the top highlights in ITU’s new Measuring the Information Society Report 2018, released today.

The MIS Report also finds that improved ICT regulation and policy-making have played a pivotal role in creating the conditions for the reduction of prices, ensuring that part of the efficiency gains of higher ICT adoption are passed on to consumers.

“This year’s report shows how increased investment in broadband technologies is driving the global digital transformation and enabling more people to access a myriad of services at the click of a button,” says ITU Secretary-General Houlin Zhao.

The report finds that there continues to be a general upward trend in the access to and use of ICTs. Most importantly, the world has crossed the halfway line in terms of Internet use, with 51.2 per cent of the world population using the Internet by the end of 2018. more>

Updates from Ciena

Sharing Bandwidth with the Neighbors

By Wayne Hickey – Neighbors, when asked, will typically share a cup of sugar. In some cases, the ‘cup of sugar’ request was, and is, a great way to meet or start a friendly conversation with our neighbors. Waving from 50 feet away, or over a fence, isn’t as inviting or approachable. While being a good neighbor has its benefits, most draw the line for sharing with things like Internet access, typically by simply adding a security key to their home WiFi network. After all, now we’re talking bandwidth, and not sugar!

But with the Internet, every connection is a ‘shared’ connection. Sometimes sharing is done close to your house, a fiber node, headend, or Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) router. BGP is the routing protocol used to route traffic across the Internet Wide Area Network (WAN).

If you want to guarantee that your service is not shared, you must get an enterprise level connection. But even with enterprise level connections, they only guarantee your speed up until the BGP router of your Internet Service Provider (ISP), and as soon as you get on the Internet – you guessed it, its shared and all bets are off!

For cable operators today, coaxial cable is used to deliver broadband services to their existing customers, and will continue for many years. In the cable operator coaxial access network, cable bandwidth is shared among all subscribers in a service group. Service group sizes can vary, but typical coaxial access networks can range in the hundreds (300-500), depending on region. more>

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Updates from Ciena

What’s Next for Cable Business Services?
By Darren McKinney – The state of cable business services, fiber versus coax, the addition of mobile services along with the advent of 5G (friend or foe), new service offerings, service level agreements, the move to virtualization, and more, were all hot topics at the recent Light Reading “Future of Cable Business Services” conference.

I have attended this conference for several years, and as it falls at the end of year it’s always a good time to reflect on what this means for the cable industry moving forward. Here are my top takeaways from the 2018 event, and what I’m thinking about heading into 2019.

For years business services represented 20%+ year-over-year revenue growth for cable MSOs – a significant growth engine given MSOs have experienced declining video subscribers (due to OTT competition), and have generally had consolidated revenue growth of 5-10% in recent years. MSOs have experienced higher growth rates in business services with small (100 employees), where these customers require more sophisticated services and competitive service level agreements (SLAs). more>

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Updates from Ciena

VodafoneZiggo is revolutionizing the Netherlands’ digital infrastructure
By Leo-Geert van den Berg – Did you know the Netherlands is Europe’s leading country in internet access, broadband connectivity and internet usage on mobile phones?

A lot of tech companies use the Netherlands as a test bed for new solutions and according to recent reports, we are among the frontrunners in the EU in cloud adoption both for businesses and consumers. When it comes to our networks, we rely on their support on our road to success. Here in the Netherlands, we pride ourselves on being open to try new things.

As the largest fixed broadband provider and second largest mobile operator by subscribers in the Netherlands, VodafoneZiggo is looking to the future, with the goal of moving the Netherlands to a renewed network in 2020 – the ‘network of the future’ –  which supports Gigabit speeds of 1.000 Mbit/s. The goal of this network is to align our mobile and fixed connections even closer, so there is a seamless transition between fixed internet and Wi-Fi.

To make networks faster, scalable, and more reliable, they must be built with the intention of becoming fully virtualized. And, thanks to Ciena’s WaveLogic Ai 400G programmable solution, more>

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Updates from datacenter.com

Data Centers Integral to Successful Digital Transformation Strategy
datacenter.com – Digital transformation has gotten a lot of attention. It involves not just the implementation of new technologies, but the alteration of business processes and models to fully leverage those technologies. This enables organizations to gain unprecedented levels of productivity, enhance customer experience, drive innovation and create competitive advantages.

According to research firm IDC, by 2020, 60% of the top manufacturers will rely on digital platforms that enhance their investments in ecosystems and experiences and support as 30% of their overall revenue.

A recent white paper issued by the Center for Global Enterprise, entitled Digital Supply Chains: A Frontside Flip, discussed how forward-looking companies are re-thinking and transforming their supply chains as they see new digital technologies and organizational models coming to the forefront of business.

An enterprise-wide digital supply chain can lead to a 20% reduction of procurement costs, a 50% reduction in supply chain costs, and an increase in revenue of 10%.

Digital transformation is changing the nature of the data center, and new technologies are constantly placing new demand on data centers and data center services. more>

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Updates from Chicago Booth

The robots are coming, and that’s (mostly) a good thing
By Nicholas Polson and James Scott – We teach data science to hundreds of students per year, and they’re all fascinated by artificial intelligence. And they ask great questions.

How does a car learn to drive itself?

How does Alexa understand what I’m saying?

How does Spotify pick such good playlists for me?

How does Facebook recognize my friends in the photos I upload?

These students realize that AI isn’t some sci-fi droid from the future; it’s right here, right now, and it’s changing the world one smartphone at a time. They all want to understand it, and they all want to be a part of it.

And our students aren’t the only ones enthusiastic about AI. They’re joined in their exaltation by the world’s largest companies—from Amazon, Facebook, and Google in America to Baidu, Tencent, and Alibaba in China.

As you may have heard, these big tech firms are waging an expensive global arms race for AI talent, which they judge to be essential to their future.

Yet while this arms race is real, we think there’s a much more powerful trend at work in AI today—a trend of diffusion and dissemination, rather than concentration. Yes, every big tech company is trying to hoard math and coding talent. But at the same time, the underlying technologies and ideas behind AI are spreading with extraordinary speed: to smaller companies, to other parts of the economy, to hobbyists and coders and scientists and researchers everywhere in the world.

That democratizing trend, more than anything else, is what has our students today so excited, as they contemplate a vast range of problems practically begging for good AI solutions. more>

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Updates from Ciena

5 Ways DCI Growth is Driving New Innovations in Transport Networking
By Kent Jordan – Data center interconnect (DCI) is at the heart of new global business models, cloud adoption, and digital content delivery and services. Cloud, ICP, and colocation operators are dominating DCI sales, and DCI is becoming more crucial for other industries as well. According to the Equinix Global Interconnection Index, global interconnect bandwidth is forecast to grow to over 8,200T by 2021, which is substantially higher than last year’s projection.

Telecommunications, manufacturing, and banking are all expected to be large contributors to total interconnect bandwidth by 2021. Smaller traffic areas, such as wholesale, retail, and healthcare, are also expected to grow at double-digit rates leading to the need for higher capacity services over time.

Purpose-built, compact, modular systems have sprouted up, offering massive scalability to enable global deployments while reducing operational expenses related to data center space, power, and cooling. These systems offer modularity and pay-as-you-grow scalability for lower traffic scenarios, so enterprises can cost-effectively scale connectivity for cloud services and applications. more>

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LiDAR Has Applications Beyond Automotive

By Charles Murray – Merlin Friesen, founder of embedded systems developer Golden Gate Research Inc., says that LiDAR is evolving faster than most engineers realize, thanks to the hard work of dozens of startups that foresee a practical future for the technology. “There’s really been an explosion of companies building LiDAR,” Friesen told Design News.

“It’s hard to keep track. There are 70 or 80 companies now. Just in the last six months, we’re seeing new names.”

Friesen’s message might come as a surprise to engineers who follow the auto industry and who understand how costly LiDAR systems can be. But, he said, self-driving cars are a demanding application that call for features that may not be needed in industrial robots and drones. Rotating LiDAR units, for example, are the norm in autonomous car applications, but are unnecessary for many industrial applications. Similarly, industrial units may not need GPS systems, accelerometers, or gyroscopes.

Friesen added that the new, smaller LiDAR units have also made in-roads into other mobile applications. His company has incorporated LiDAR sensors weighing a few hundred grams in drones for mapping.

In essence, the end goal for such applications is not much different than automotive, he said. “It’s very similar in that you’re looking for obstacles, calculating the distance to the obstacles, and then trying to move your device,” he told us. more>

Updates from Ciena

Dealing with packet networking complexity? It’s time to evolutionize.
By Scott McFeely – As I travel around the world meeting with our customers, I hear time and time again about their continued struggles building and maintaining packet networks.

Today’s TDM and Packet (Ethernet/IP/MPLS) networks are too operationally complex, making them costly to operate, which results in a slower time-to-market and growing inflexibility to successfully address changing customer demands. Networks still lack the automation and agility to rapidly deploy new services.

If operators are to succeed, they need to make changes – now. The traditional approach to building packet networks, from access to metro, just isn’t up to the task.

At Ciena, we believe that the future belongs to the adaptive – those who do more than just recognize the need to modernize, but who see the need to actively “evolutionize” their packet networks toward a more virtual, modular, and automated design. more>

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Updates from Ciena

Life’s tough in the great outdoors, especially for packet-optical network gear
By Frank O. Miller – Packet-optical network gear gets pretty pampered in the data center, with regulated temperatures and a whole team of techs on hand to fix any problems. But what happens if you want to put your equipment outside, closer to your customers? How do you know your switches and other gear will be tough enough to survive?

The answer’s simple: regular data center infrastructure won’t be up to surviving in the great outdoors. Instead, you’ll need equipment that’s street-tough, temperature-hardened, and always available – come snow, rain or shine.

So let’s take a moment and think about some of the biggest challenges that could impact your network equipment in the great outdoors…

In mainland Europe, the temperature differentials between summer and winter can be extreme, requiring all network equipment in street cabinets to be temperature hardened. In Germany, for example, many areas experience daily averages of 0°C in the winter, with summer daily averages of around 24°C. In Russia, the swing is even greater, with winter temperatures of -25°C in many regions and summer averages of 30+°C. more>

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