Category Archives: Communication industry

Updates from Ciena

Why Adaptive is the biggest story in networking
The long-desired goal of network automation is coming closer to reality. Joe Cumello explains why autonomous networking alone is not enough, and introduces Ciena’s Adaptive Network™, which combines the right mixture of automation, intelligence, and scale that allows network operators to adapt in today’s constantly-shifting ecosystem.
By Joe Cumello – Next-gen, intelligent, flexible, automated, agile, optimized, programmable, elastic.

Our industry has been using these words for years to describe the end game for networks. With Ciena’s recent 25-year anniversary, we’ve been spending quite a bit of time looking back at the early days – and it seems like the entire industry has been using these aspirational network descriptions for as long as there have been networks.

Maybe 2018 is the year “aspirational” starts to become “actuality.”

Like no other time in our industry’s history, a collection of technologies and advancements is bringing the long-desired goal of a more automated network closer to reality.

And none too soon. Make your way out of the marketing slideware and into the cold reality of real network operations, and most service providers will tell you that much of their process is still too manual, with multiple network-management systems that require spreadsheets and offline planning tools to make even the simplest changes to the network.

Network operators do need greater automation to cope with the harsh realities of today’s environment. But “full automation,” or so-called “autonomous networking,” isn’t the complete answer they are seeking, because it’s now clear that today’s environment isn’t the same one they will face tomorrow. In this constantly-shifting ecosystem, automation alone will always have to be revised and reset.

It is with this challenge in view that Ciena brings the Adaptive Network to our customers. more>

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Updates from ITU

UNESCO rallies international organizations, civil society and private sector partners in a broad Coalition to ensure #LearningNeverStops
By Clare O’Hagan – At a time of when 87% of the world’s student population is affected by COVID-19 school closures, UNESCO is launching a global education coalition to support countries in scaling up their best distance learning practices and reaching children and youth who are most at risk.

Over 1.5 billion learners in 165 countries are affected by COVID-19 school closures.

“Never before have we witnessed educational disruption on such a scale,” said UNESCO Director-General Audrey Azoulay. “Partnership is the only way forward. This Coalition is a call for coordinated and innovative action to unlock solutions that will not only support learners and teachers now, but through the recovery process, with a principle focus on inclusion and equity.”

Since closing schools to contain the COVID-19 pandemic, governments have been deploying distance learning solutions and grappling with the complexity of provisioning education remotely, from delivering content and supporting teachers to providing guidance to families and addressing connectivity challenges. Equity is the paramount concern because closures disproportionately hurt vulnerable and disadvantaged students who rely on schools for a range of social services, including health and nutrition.

“We must speed up the ways we share experience, and help the most vulnerable, whether or not they have internet access”, said Angelina Jolie, UN High Commission for Refugees Special Envoy, who partnered with UNESCO in the establishment of the Coalition. more>

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Updates from ITU

How can we ensure safety and public trust​ in AI for automated and assisted driving?
ITU News – Cars are becoming increasingly automated. Drivers already benefit from a wide range of advanced driver-assistance systems (ADAS), such as lane keeping, adaptive cruise control, collision warning, and blind spot warning, which are gradually becoming standard features on most vehicles.

Today’s automated systems are taking over an increasing amount of responsibility for the driving task. It is expected that soon, sensors will take the place of human impulse, and artificial intelligence (AI) will substitute for human intelligence.

This process is defined through various level steps, from low levels of automation where the driver retains overall control of the vehicle in level 1, to a fully-autonomous system in level 5.

10 years ago, manufacturers predicted many cars on today’s roads would be fully automated, but it still remains a distant future for the automotive industry. At the recent Future Networked Car Symposium 2020 at ITU Headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland, top experts joined a panel entitled ‘AI for autonomous and assisted driving – how to ensure safety and public trust’ to discuss the progress and the prospects for vehicles that drive themselves – and how we might achieve this future. more>

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Updates from Ciena

Single-wave 400G across 4,000km? Yes – with Ciena’s new Waveserver 5.
Ciena’s popular family of Waveserver products just got a new member – Waveserver 5. With tunable capacity up to 800G and support for 400GbE services at any distance, learn how Waveserver 5 is already setting new industry benchmarks – in live networks.

By Kent Jordan – Two mega-trends have been driving rapid innovation in optical networks. Advanced coherent technology brings the promise of greater network capacity, now reaching up to 800G across short links and 400G at distance. At the same time, new compact modular platforms promise greater density, reduced footprint and lower energy consumption.

What if you could combine this incredible performance and awesome density into one device? Sounds too good to be true, right?

Well not anymore. Ciena’s most advanced coherent technology, WaveLogicTM 5 Extreme, has arrived in the newest member of our Waveserver family of interconnect platforms: Waveserver 5. And, it’s bringing the performance you need, packaged in a compact and efficient footprint.

Combining the world’s most innovative coherent chipset with the simple, server-like operational model the Waveserver family is known for, Waveserver 5 provides network operators with industry-leading transport economics for high-capacity, high-growth applications.

Internet2 will be one of Ciena’s first customers to deploy Waveserver 5. They are building out their next-generation research and education (R&E) network across the U.S. and they have selected Ciena’s best, most flexible, open and highest-performance technologies to do the job. more>

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Updates from Ciena

Building the Adaptive Network – starting with silicon
The journey to the Adaptive Network for network operators is not a linear path and involves managing the deployment of a range of new technologies. Key to this journey is the deployment of a programmable infrastructure. Patricia Bower explores coherent DSP design – one of the primary tools network equipment designers have in order to enable programmability and flexibility – and its significance for network transformations.
By Patricia Bower – New bandwidth-intensive content and applications, along with a massive proliferation of connected devices, will place heavy demands on communications networks going forward. To prepare for this, providers must transform their networks though the implementation of new hardware and software solutions. The Adaptive NetworkTM is the ultimate goal and consists of three main elements – a programmable packet and optical infrastructure to connect network elements; an analytics and intelligence layer to analyze and predict network behavior; and software control and automation to simplify end-to-end management across multi-vendor, multi-domain networks.

A programmable infrastructure is based on network systems which can support multiple operating modes, allow for optimization of network paths through tunability, provide for scalability and support intelligence through real-time link monitoring. These capabilities contribute to a network that can adapt and scale according to demand.

High-speed global communications networks are based on the manipulation of photons (light), but over the last ten years semiconductor electronics has been the foundation for significant advances in the delivery of lower cost per bit and greater flexibility. Semiconductor integrated circuits (IC) have continued to increase in complexity, with each new generation of manufacturing process technology offering greater functionality, smaller area and lower power.

Fabricated primarily in silicon, IC processing technology – also referred to as CMOS – is based on large-scale integration of transistor gates as a primary building block. Each process node is notionally identified by a gate size expressed in micrometers or nanometers, although the names are typically no longer related directly. Volume manufacturing for the majority of semiconductor products is currently in “7nm” (or equivalent) from various CMOS foundries. Today’s Application Specific-ICs (ASICs) can integrate several hundred million transistors in a chip area of only few hundred mm2. more>

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Updates from ITU

Transforming the driver experience: The connected technology under the hood of intelligent cars
By Amit Sachdeva – There was a time when any talk of a new car among enthusiasts or potential buyers revolved around engine power, fuel efficiency and the sleek design and finish.

Today, that same conversation has expanded to include sustainability and a connected experience.

Consumers expect every aspect of their life to be connected to the internet, so why should one’s car be any different? Automakers are aware of this and are responding by partnering with technology and B2B companies to find innovative ways to satisfy the demands of customers, and avoid being disrupted.

As a result, newer models with embedded Internet of Things (IoT) connectivity and intelligent applications built-in are redefining the manufacturing landscape and the driving experience for consumers.

The surge in the global connected cars market not only impacts the auto industry, it also offers several opportunities for businesses – retailers, insurers, entertainment businesses and of course, the car makers themselves – to leverage the huge volumes of data generated and captured by connected cars to achieve new levels of customer loyalty and open up new revenue streams. more>

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Updates from Ciena

The closed and proprietary mobile networks of the past aren’t welcome any longer. Find out how Ciena is helping customers benefit from a more open, automated, and adaptable 5G wireline network.
By Joe Marsella – After years of hype, I think it’s fair to say that 5G is here. Initial deployments are underway around the world. There’s genuine excitement for a new generation of applications that exploit the massive end-to-end performance gains that 5G will provide across the mobile network. From AR/VR to IoT to gaming to streaming, our industry will push 5G technology to its limits to give consumers and businesses rich and rewarding digital experiences.

But here’s the problem. I’ve traveled the world and spoken to network operators of every size, mobile and wholesale operators alike. They all say the same thing. If the full promise of 5G is to be commercially realized, this time it must be different. We’ll need to challenge the traditional, closed way of building end-to-end mobile networks.

The world is changing. Digital disruption, virtualization, and openness are all driving a change in how networks are built. Look, we don’t shop the way we used to 30 years ago. We order transportation services with the push of a button, and many kids don’t know what it feels like to wait until 8:00 pm for their favorite show to be on (or even worse, wait through commercials!) – because of digital disruption.

It’s time for that change to come to wireless networks. For the past 30 years, successive generations of wireless networks were built a certain way: closed. Mobile Network Operators (MNOs) and wholesale operators alike had to rely on very few vendors and their proprietary architectures, interfaces, and protocols. What if your locked-in vendor wasn’t innovating at the pace you needed to successfully compete? Well – you were stuck until the next generation network was upon us and hoped this time for open, standards-based solutions. more>

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Updates from ITU

New Opportunities, New Challenges for AI
By Houlin Zhao – At ITU, we are working hard with partners across the world to ensure the trusted, safe and inclusive development of AI technologies — and equitable access to their benefits. That is why we organize the annual AI for Good Global Summit, the leading United Nations summit on how to harness the power of AI to improve lives worldwide.

The Summit connects AI innovators with those seeking solutions to the world’s greatest challenges so as to identify practical applications of AI that can accelerate progress towards the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

This year’s Summit was organized into five “Breakthrough Tracks”: AI and Health; AI and Education; AI and Human Dignity and Equality; Scaling AI and AI for Space. There were also sessions on the future of Smart Mobility, AI and agriculture, AI’s role in arts and culture, the unintended consequences of AI — and much more.

In addition, the Summit showcased the latest in AI technologies — from drones, exoskeletons, and robotics to avatars, autonomous cars, and AI-powered health solutions. more>

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3 Reasons Embedded Security Is Being Ignored

By Jacob Beningo – The IoT has grown to the point that everyone and their brother is in the process of connecting their products to the Internet. This is great because it opens new revenue generating opportunities for businesses and in some cases completely new business models that can generate rapid growth. The problem that I am seeing though is that in several cases there seems to be little to no interest in securing these devices.

(I draw this conclusion from the fact that embedded conferences, webinars, articles and even social media conversations seem to draw far less interest then nearly any other topic).

I’m going to explore the primary reasons why I believe development teams are neglecting security in their embedded products and explain why security doesn’t have to be a necessary evil.

Reason #1 – The Perception That Adding Security Is Expensive

I believe that there is still a perception in the embedded space that security is expensive. Right now, if you were to survey the availability of security experts, you will find that there is a severe shortage at the moment.

Reason #2 – We Will “Add It Later”

Nobody wants to be on the front page due to a security breach. I believe in many cases, companies want to include security, but in the early stages of product development, when funds are short, security is often the lowest priority. With many good intentions, the teams often think they’ll add it later after we get through this sprint or this development cycle. The problem that is encountered here is that you can’t add security on at the end of the development cycle.

Reason #3 – Teams Are In Too Big A Hurry

Nearly every development team that I encounter is behind schedule and in a hurry. New start-ups, seasoned successful teams, there is always way too much to do and never enough time (or budget). In many cases, teams may be developing a new product and need to get to market fast in order to start generating revenue so that they can pay the bills.

Security is a foundational element to any connected device. Security cannot be added on at the end of a product and must be carefully thought through from the very beginning. Without thinking about it up front, the development team can’t ensure they have the right hardware components in place to properly isolate their software components or expect to have the right software frameworks in their application to properly manage and secure their product. more>

Updates from Ciena

The future is near. Is your business network ready to adapt?
New technologies are changing the way we do business, so enterprises cannot be limited by network performance. Learn why your IP network should adapt to support your business’ needs, and not the other way around.
By Vinicius Santos – Legacy business models are disappearing fast, making us almost forget about how things were implemented just a few years ago. The video streaming business is less than ten years old and physically traveling to a store to rent a hard copy of a movie seems like ancient history. Most of us can barely remember when we had to save essential files on in-house data centers servers instead of somewhere in the cloud. Even sharing data using thumb drives is becoming rather “unusual.”

Well-established businesses are facing waves of digital transformation and are trying to align with customers’ expectations while fighting to maintain their current market share from disruptive innovators. At the same time, these disruptive innovators are becoming much faster when moving from niche markets to mainstream and highly lucrative markets, using technology, speed, and agility as their main tools to better serve their targeted markets.

It’s a process where every new technology is a piece of the transformational engine, creating new business models and opportunities that consequently create additional technologies. The wheel of innovation is not just spinning fast, it’s accelerating!

At the forefront of this transformation are technologies such as cloud computing, analytics, edge compute, machine learning, big data, automation, and the Internet of Things (IoT). All of these technology building blocks have a single enabling factor that tends to be neglected in most conversations: connectivity. more>

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