Category Archives: How to

To Get the Best Results From Your Employees, Assemble Them Like a Team of Surgeons

By Oliver Staley – When assembling teams, managers should think about what the different members contribute. Teams where all the members share the same skills or background won’t cover the same breadth as one in which members bring a range of abilities and experiences.

There’s a growing body of research that shows that diversity strengthens teams, whether they’re juries or corporate boards.

Homogenous teams may have less friction and feel like they’re working productively, but as a study of problem-solving among members of fraternity and sororities shows, they’re are less likely to arrive at the right answer than groups where members can challenge assumptions and shared beliefs. more> https://goo.gl/KUDAIW

Updates from Adobe

Take 10: Zesty
By Terri Stone – As with our previous Take 10 Challenges, we gave the duo ten images and a theme—in this case, the word zesty. True to form, Leta Sobierajski and Wade Jeffree rewrote the challenge rules, rejecting some of the original images and choosing others. “Questioning the brief is always going to lead you to more interesting places,” Jeffree says.

They began the challenge by contemplating the meaning of zesty. “It speaks to energy and food, and we eat a lot and have a lot of energy,” cracks Jeffree. Sobierajski adds, “It resonates with our personalities. It’s a little zingy.”

The designers usually include physical elements in their work, even when the final deliverables are digital. It was clear from their initial sketch that the Take 10 challenge would be no exception.

Sobierajski and Jeffree envisioned a dimensional abstract landscape, taking structural inspiration from Joan Miró, Pablo Picasso, Henry Moore, Barbara Hepworth, and Oskar Schlemmer, and working with ideas of Cubism, Dada, Bauhaus, and modernism. They identified new Adobe Stock assets that fit their notions of what zesty means; then they moved on to building the abstract shapes out of thick foam core covered in clay. They also designed suits that would render their bodies as abstract as the set. more> https://goo.gl/xPDk95

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The Path to Better Management of Government’s Huge Programs

By Alan Balutis, Dan Chenok, Greg Giddens, Stan Soloway and Jim Williams – The pace of technology is more rapid today. Government, like the commercial sector, has changed its approach to the concept of programs, shifting to a model in which modular steps and agile processes have largely displaced traditional, large-scale “waterfall” strategies. Still, the need for strong program management skills remains central to success.

But, outside of the Department of Defense and a few civilian agencies, program management is not ‘institutionalized’ as an established management discipline.”

  • First, we believe there needs to a clear line of leadership. Program management is a core component of agency success and should be treated and embraced as such.
  • Second, we need to establish clarity of responsibility and accountability for the delivery of program results.
  • Third, with the establishment under PMIAA (Program Management Improvement and Accountability Act) of the program management career field, we must move quickly to design and implement a consistent training and professional development process for program managers, as well as a clear and contemporary set of requirements for hiring them.
  • Change management, a skill critical to driving success in managing complex programs involving multiple stakeholders, should be a key element of this curriculum.
  • Fourth, to help program managers continue to grow and learn, OMB (Office of Management and Budget) should ensure that the Program Management Policy Council created by the statute is set up effectively.

With these building blocks in place, agencies can zero in on what is most important: performance. Programs fail for many reasons, including inadequate governance, meaningless metrics, and insufficient capacity for or willingness to change. Strong program management can help overcome each of those barriers; without it, they are likely to endure. more> https://goo.gl/PHG67A

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Updates from Adobe

5 Illustration Trends for 2017
By Terry Hemphill – Illustrators whose work combines found imagery and traditional illustration in a conceptual, collage style are in high demand, according to Marlena Torzecka, president of Marlena Agency, an illustration and art agency in Princeton, New Jersey.

“Time is so valuable now, there’s often only one or two days to produce a piece for publication, making it nearly impossible to send a photographer to do a shoot for a story,” says Torzecka. “For example, for an editorial illustration about a breaking political story, it might mean photographing several people together who may not even be in the same location. It’s much easier to use existing photos to tell a new story.”

But collage also provides a wide-open playing field for illustrators to explore and mix ideas and concepts to produce images with a special power and appeal for the viewer. more> https://goo.gl/0je6O7

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The slow professor can dish out a more nutritious education

BOOK REVIEW

The Slow Professor: Challenging the Culture of Speed in the Academy, Authors: Barbara Seeber and Maggie Berg.
Slow Food Nation, Author: Carlo Petrini.

By Barbara Seeber and Maggie Berg – Distractedness and fragmentation characterize contemporary life. In order to protect the intellectual and pedagogic life of the university, we need to create opportunities to think and to shift our sense of time. This might mean getting away from having everything scheduled down to the minute. We can’t do our best work if we are frantic.

Slow teaching is not about lowering standards. Rather, it is about reducing our distractedness so that we can focus on our students and our subjects. We need to be able to concentrate on creating a convivial classroom in which our students can meet the challenges – and we can foster the joys – of learning a discipline.

Slow scholarship is about resisting the pressure to reduce thinking to the imperative of immediate usefulness, marketability and grant generation. It’s about preserving the idea of scholarship as open-ended enquiry. It will improve the quality of teaching and learning. more> https://goo.gl/bpngGv

Why Overcoming Inertia Takes Two Whys

By George Bradt – As laid out in an earlier article on “Three Steps to a Compelling Message,” leadership stories to inspire change need to:

  1. Depict the platform for change (why)
  2. Create a vision of a better future (what)
  3. Lay out a call to action (how)

Scott Jackson provides a model leadership story in his book, Take Me With You, published this week. In particular, he nails the two whys it takes to overcome inertia.

  1. Why #1 – Why I Can’t Keep Doing What I’m Doing
  2. Why #2 – Why I Should Listen To You On This Subject

more> https://goo.gl/Dc74Ee

How Trump’s Plan to Reorganize Government Could Work

By Steve Goodrich – On March 13, President Trump issued an executive order for a Comprehensive Plan for Reorganizing the Executive Branch. It calls for the OMB director and agency heads to develop plans for improving the efficiency, effectiveness and accountability of agencies, subcomponents and programs within 180 days.

I am not naïve, and yes, I have seen this many times before. But if done right, with a strong foundation and a plan, it could work. It could also be another once-and-done exercise that demonstrates little to no value. Many administrations have conducted similar exercises, most of which faded with the political passing. The Trump executive order runs the risk of having little or negative impact, reducing readiness and demoralizing employees. It also has the potential to do great things for our country.

Here are a few suggestions for how to make it work.

  1. It must involve Congress.
  2. It should begin with a national summit that results in a strategic plan.
  3. Someone must be in charge.
  4. Reorganization must address vertical and horizontal programs.
  5. Reform must cross agency boundaries.
  6. Accept that some investment will be necessary.
  7. Leverage what you have before you throw anything out.
  8. Make hard decisions.
  9. Fix the foundation.
  10. Create a culture of sharing.
  11. Grow people.
  12. Address financial issues

more> https://goo.gl/CGO0zu

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The Future of Growing Cities Rests in Smart Transit

By Robert Garcia – Transportation isn’t just about moving people around; it’s also about moving goods. As home of the nation’s largest port complex, Long Beach has made significant strides to transport goods in more efficient and environmentally sustainable ways, and we are quickly becoming a model for ports across the globe.

Long Beach is now ranked in the top 10 cities nationally for walkability and bike-ability. And we have even used technology to make it easier for those who elect to drive, with apps like EZParkLB, which shows parking availability and pricing in real time. In addition, we have partnered with Mercedes Benz to launch an electric vehicle charger giveaway program to encourage more people to adopt sustainable technology.

Through the Green Port Policy, the Port of Long Beach has successfully introduced smart technologies over the past twenty years, bringing us closer to our goal of becoming a zero-emissions facility. We have reduced greenhouse gases significantly by using electric equipment on the docks and are currently in the process of converting existing vehicles to clean cargo-handling technologies. Other advances include providing shore power for ships, allowing engines to be shut down, and on-dock rail that shifts more than 30 percent of the cargo shipments from trucks to trains. And our newest terminal, Middle Harbor, uses the most advanced automated technology available to move containers from ships and into economic markets throughout the country. more> https://goo.gl/XBpdXi

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Updates from Adobe

The Infinity Wall
By Charles Purdy – Inspired by the event space’s interior design—which involved curvilinear wood elements and sculptural wooden columns—the team came up with the “Infinity” theme.

“The interior had planes of wood, and there was a beautiful Zaha Hadid bench that looked like a tree trunk made of slats of wood,” says Vincent Rogozyk. “For this reason, we started designing with slats. The scale of the wall informed the scale of the graphics—the idea was to make the whole thing look like a giant object.”

Bałauszko and Michał Czubak brought the designers’ sketches to life, turning the biomorphic and geometric shapes into polished motion graphics. The final work comprised four basic scenes of abstract 3D kinetic animations that were programmed to morph and transition in a loop. “We designed using 3D software and Adobe After Effects CC, with the help of an offsite render farm,” says Rogozyk. “We definitely tested the limits of the hotel’s Internet connection.” more> https://goo.gl/JzQHRZ

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Your Brain as Laboratory: The Science of Meditation

By John Yates +- an define science as the systematic study of the natural world through observation and experiment, yielding an organized body of knowledge on a particular subject. The human mind is undeniably a suitable subject for scientific study, and one purpose of meditation is careful observation of one’s own mind.

This observation reveals consistent patterns that meditators share with one another and with teachers who direct their practice.

However, meditation is not simply passive observation, nor could it be, since the very act of observation is itself an activity of mind. Rather the meditator intentionally employs attention, awareness, and other mental faculties in a variety of ways to better understand the functional behavior of the mind. more> https://goo.gl/Pp47U6