Category Archives: Product

Updates from Siemens

Medical Equipment Design and Development Solutions
Siemens – Medical instrument and equipment companies must carefully examine all of their development projects to ensure that product development portfolios make the best use of people, time and money. Too often, companies find their portfolio is not aligned with the company growth strategy, they have limited resources for the right projects, or they continue to invest in low-priority projects. The traditional budgeting process consumes 20 to 30 percent of management’s time, and does not provide executives with ongoing visibility into a project portfolio or support agile decision-making.

Siemens PLM Software’s solutions for portfolio, program and project management give you a way to compare return on investment (ROI), cost, resources and project schedules so you can make informed decisions, keep track of projects and compare them against plans.

High-quality medical instrument and equipment design is important to ensure functionality, quality and aesthetics. Engineers need the right tools to develop new products that reduce cost, meet requirements, and increase innovation.

Knowledge is core to the success of a medical instrument and equipment company. Companies that can manage change and re-use that knowledge are more successful in this competitive industry. A strong and flexible product lifecycle management (PLM) backbone is vital to managing product knowledge. more>

Related>

Updates from Adobe

Variable Fonts Are the Future of Web Type
By Mandy Michael – A variable font is a single file that acts like multiple fonts. Variable fonts can improve page-load times, but their appeal goes way beyond that: Site visitors get an improved reading experience, and designers get greater creative freedom.

While it’s still early days, some software applications—including the latest Illustrator and Photoshop—and many web browsers do support the technology, and more will follow. It’s a good time to understand how variable fonts work and how to use them in your web designs.

Inventive type designers aren’t restricting themselves to expected variations, such as weight, width, or italic. They’re creating variations that address effect, readability, and style. more>

Related>

It Takes a Village to Create Solid Electrolytes

By Kevin Clemens – Presently, commercial lithium ion batteries use a carbon graphite anode electrode and a metal oxide cathode electrode. They are separated by a liquid organic solvent that can pass lithium ions between the electrodes while preventing electrons from making the journey. The organic solvent of the electrolyte is flammable—resulting in a potential for a fire in the event that a lithium ion battery is punctured.

The anode side of a lithium ion battery is made from layers of graphite. Lithium ions are inserted between the material’s layers during charging and are released during discharge. Battery researchers realize that replacing the graphite anode with metallic lithium would allow many more lithium ions to flow during discharge, producing a battery with at least twice the capacity. But during the charging stage of a lithium metal battery, spiky crystalline structures, called dendrites, form on the metal surface. These dendrites can grow through the liquid electrolyte, reaching the cathode and shorting out the battery.

A worldwide search is on for a solid or semi-solid electrolyte that can prevent dendrite growth while allowing the easy passage of lithium ions without conducting electrons. more>

Updates from Chicago Booth

Are you ready for personalized pricing?
By Brian Wallheimer – The introduction of the price tag was a big step forward for American retailing, and you can thank John Wanamaker. In the 1870s, Wanamaker purchased a former Philadelphia railroad depot and expanded his men’s clothing business to include women’s clothing and dry goods.

Along with Macy’s in New York and other department stores popping up in major cities, Wanamaker’s Grand Depot revolutionized how people shopped, primarily by placing many different items under one roof. But it went a step further and changed not only where people purchased items but how they paid. It adopted the price tag.

Until that point, pricing had involved a dance between clerk and customer. When a customer picked up a shirt and admired it, a clerk had to know how much the product cost the store, the overhead associated with storing it, competitors’ prices, and more. Meanwhile, he had to figure out, was the customer in a hurry and willing to pay more, or had he come prepared to negotiate for a steeper discount?

With more than 100 product counters to staff, Wanamaker didn’t have time to teach employees the fine art of haggling. Instead, he affixed a note to every item in the store with the amount a customer was expected to pay. more>

Related>

Updates from Siemens

Generative Design in Solid Edge: Optimize Shapes to Achieve Design Goals
Siemens – Generative design in Solid Edge integrates advanced topology optimization within the Solid Edge 3D modeling toolkit, helping designers to create lighter components, minimize material waste in downstream manufacturing. Generative design produces an organic, reduced-mass geometric solution of a specific material optimized within a defined space, accounting for permissible loads and constraints.

These highly customized designs are well-suited for casting or high-resolution 3D printing, or they can be modified for traditional manufacturing. more (pdf)>

Game changing technologies: Exploring the impact on production processes and work

Eurofund – The difference between incremental innovation and disruptive innovation can be seen as the difference between improving a candle by adding a wick that burns more slowly (incremental innovation) and inventing the electric light bulb (disruption) (Christensen, 1997).

Technological innovation is permanent and ongoing, but from time to time new discoveries can pave the way for totally new uses and applications.

New technological possibilities and combinations of them can bring disruption not only at a product level, but can also involve the entire process related to its production (Arthur, 2009). This will have consequences for the working conditions of individuals employed on that process and on employment at establishment level, and thereby on the structures that regulate the relationship between the social partners in that particular sector.

Digital technology is changing manufacturing. Such changes, often placed in the heading of Industry 4.0, together describe a set of technologies that are likely to bring about deep transformations of the production process. Advanced robots, networked machines and artificial intelligence will be combined to generate new products and new ways of making products. This project focused on five possible game changing technologies over a time horizon of 10 years (that is, up to 2025).

Industry 4.0 initiatives are spreading not only in Germany but also across Europe; initiatives by EU Member States aimed at promoting advanced manufacturing techniques are being monitored by the European Commission.

IIoT is directly and explicitly an information encoding, communicating and processing technology. By attaching interconnected sensors to potentially all objects within the production process, IIoT transforms the productive process into a system that is both physical and digital (that is, cyber-physical). As well as generating a detailed virtual model of the entire production process that can be optimised with the superior processing power of digital technologies, the technology makes the objects themselves digital devices that can interact and be algorithmically controlled. more> (pdf)

Updates from Siemens

Multi-Discipline Data Management for Electronics & Semiconductors
Siemens – Today’s electronic devices are a synthesis of multiple designs—mechanical, electrical, electronics, embedded software and application software.

In addition, because of rapid development, many hardware features remain unexplored and undermanaged resulting in sub-optimal integration between hardware and software. The disadvantages of operating in different single-discipline platforms and the increasing role of global suppliers in early stages of design are driving engineering organizations to invest in multi-domain integration strategies to ensure the system works flawlessly.

Siemens PLM Software offers a multi-disciplinary approach to engineering lifecycle management that leverages integrated requirements management, secure supplier collaboration, and a single harmonized design, verification and testing environment across multiple engineering platforms. more>

Related>

Updates from Siemens

Shipbuilding
Siemens – Transform your shipyard into a seamlessly integrated and synchronized enterprise linking designers, engineers, production specialists, support teams, partners and suppliers to optimize performance, maximize lifecycle productivity and sustain competitiveness. Our holistic shipbuilding solution spans the entire shipbuilding enterprise and lifecycle to enable shipbuilders to integrate their organizational knowledge, automate processes throughout the product lifecycle and improve efficiency, accuracy and execution to reduce time-to-delivery.

The increasing complexity of products, development processes, and design teams challenges you to find new tools and methods to deliver greater innovation and higher quality at lower cost. NX product design software from Siemens PLM Software delivers power, efficiency and cost savings that extend beyond the design process to all phases of product development.

Additive manufacturing is changing the way products are designed as well as how they are manufactured, by enabling optimized designs that were previously impossible or too expensive to make. Design, optimize, and build metal and plastic components using the latest additive manufacturing methods. more>

Related>

Updates from Siemens

Consolidating 3D Printing Tool Chains to Mitigate Risk in Medical Device Applications
By J Thompson – Use of 3D Printing technology to create medical devices has been widely publicized over the past several years. Most of these stories illustrate the unique ability for 3D Printing (aka Additive Manufacturing / AM) technology to produce highly complex organic shapes.

Despite past success with AM, and very promising growth opportunities, there are significant risks with the current AM practices for workflows in device design and manufacturing. These risks must be recognized and addressed by device makers to fully realize the potential of AM, and avoid failure modes inherent in current practices.

Today, the biggest risks are caused by software “tool chains” in which different, specialized software applications are used sequentially to yield finished devices. A fundamental problem with serial tool chains is rework. What happens when you get off the “happy path”, and issues are discovered in the fourth, fifth, or tenth tool in the chain, and resolution requires a change in the first or second tool in the chain? That typically means serially reworking the entire workflow from the point of change.

This kind of rework should be viewed as expected, normal, necessary, commonplace, and even desirable since it theoretically leads to an improved final result. However, as AM attempts to enter an “industrial” stage of maturity, there are several risks associated a serial tool chain, especially if rework is manual and requires experts to re-do knowledge-intensive rework. more>

So Much More than a Tiger

By Bolaji Ojo – The foundation for what Taiwan is today and what will be years from now were laid decades ago by successive leaders in government and private sectors who elevated the island above natural and geopolitical obstacles to ensure its survival.

Taiwan – also known as the Republic of China – is not at risk of extinction. Rapid economic growth catapulted Taiwan into the group of countries economists like to describe as Asian Tigers, but the island plays an even more central role in the high-tech ecosystem.

It is today headquarters to some of the better-known players in the electronics industry, amongst them Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. Ltd., the world’s biggest chip foundry. Foxconn, the No. 1 global contract manufacturer and a Top 5 high-tech company by sales, calls Taiwan home, as does WPG Holdings, a leading distributor of electronic components. Taiwan is a major supplier of PCBs to OEMs and EMS providers and is host to AU Optronics Corp., one of the biggest suppliers of displays for smartphones, PCs and laptops.

Taiwan’s challenge this time is finding a way to respond to China’s ascendance and staving off rivals elsewhere. Taiwan was one of the forces behind the emergence of China as a heavyweight in the electronics supply chain. The huge investments of money and expertise poured into China by Taiwan, Japan and other Western countries helped to turn the Communist country into a manufacturing hub for the electronics industry. For Taiwan, though, China presents a conundrum; It has become both a beneficiary of and a victim of China’s explosive growth. more>