Category Archives: Transportation

Updates from Siemens

Multi-Discipline Data Management for Electronics
Siemens – Integrated hardware and software design and testing on electronic products are now part of a system of delivery needs, which can only be enforced by a tightly integrated and unified multi-discipline platform.

Manage multi-disciplinary engineering teams with an integrated approach to engineering lifecycle management that leverages integrated requirements management, secure supplier collaboration and an engineering management platform that combines mechanical, electronic and software co-design and co-simulation in a single collaborative environment.

Today’s electronic devices are a synthesis of multiple designs—mechanical, electrical, electronics, embedded software and application software. In addition, because of rapid development, many hardware features remain unexplored and under-managed resulting in sub-optimal integration between hardware and software.

The disadvantages of operating in different single-discipline platforms and the increasing role of global suppliers in early stages of design are driving engineering organizations to invest in multi-domain integration strategies to ensure the system works flawlessly. more>

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Self-Driving Vehicles: What Will Happen to Truck Drivers?

By Andrew Yang – You would have to have been asleep these past years not to have noticed that manufacturing jobs have been disappearing in large numbers. In 2000 there were still 17.5 million manufacturing workers in the U.S. Then, the numbers fell off a cliff, plummeting to less than 12 million before rebounding slightly starting in 2011.

More than 5 million manufacturing workers lost their jobs after 2000. More than eighty percent of the jobs lost – or 4 million jobs – were due to automation. Men make up 73% of manufacturing workers, so this hit working class men particularly hard. About one in six working-age men in America is now out of the workforce, one of the highest rates among developed countries.

What happened to these 5 million workers? A rosy economist might imagine that they found new manufacturing jobs, or were retrained and reskilled for different jobs, or maybe they moved to another state for greener pastures.

In reality, many of them left the workforce. One Department of Labor survey in 2012 found that 41 percent of displaced manufacturing workers between 2009 and 2011 were either still unemployed or dropped out of the labor market between within three years of losing their jobs.

This is a good indicator of what will occur when truck drivers lose their jobs. Truck drivers’ average age is 49, 94% are male, and they are typically high school graduates. Driving a truck is the most popular job in 29 states – there are 3.5 million truck drivers nationwide. more>

Updates from Georgia Tech

Finally, a Robust Fuel Cell that Runs on Methane at Practical Temperatures
By Ben Brumfield – Fuel cells have not been particularly known for their practicality and affordability, but that may have just changed. There’s a new cell that runs on cheap fuel at temperatures comparable to automobile engines and which slashes materials costs.

Though the cell is in the lab, it has high potential to someday electrically power homes and perhaps cars, say the researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology who led its development. In a new study in the journal Nature Energy the researchers detailed how they reimagined the entire fuel cell with the help of a newly invented fuel catalyst.

The catalyst has dispensed with high-priced hydrogen fuel by making its own out of cheap, readily available methane. And improvements throughout the cell cooled the seething operating temperatures that are customary in methane fuel cells dramatically, a striking engineering accomplishment. more>

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LiDAR Has Applications Beyond Automotive

By Charles Murray – Merlin Friesen, founder of embedded systems developer Golden Gate Research Inc., says that LiDAR is evolving faster than most engineers realize, thanks to the hard work of dozens of startups that foresee a practical future for the technology. “There’s really been an explosion of companies building LiDAR,” Friesen told Design News.

“It’s hard to keep track. There are 70 or 80 companies now. Just in the last six months, we’re seeing new names.”

Friesen’s message might come as a surprise to engineers who follow the auto industry and who understand how costly LiDAR systems can be. But, he said, self-driving cars are a demanding application that call for features that may not be needed in industrial robots and drones. Rotating LiDAR units, for example, are the norm in autonomous car applications, but are unnecessary for many industrial applications. Similarly, industrial units may not need GPS systems, accelerometers, or gyroscopes.

Friesen added that the new, smaller LiDAR units have also made in-roads into other mobile applications. His company has incorporated LiDAR sensors weighing a few hundred grams in drones for mapping.

In essence, the end goal for such applications is not much different than automotive, he said. “It’s very similar in that you’re looking for obstacles, calculating the distance to the obstacles, and then trying to move your device,” he told us. more>

Updates from Siemens

Equipment Design
Siemens – Deliver greater innovation in equipment design at higher quality and lower cost with comprehensive 3D product design capabilities for all Energy & Utility industry verticals. Our 3D CAD solutions provide a fully integrated and intuitive solution suite of broad and deep, best-in-class capabilities.

We enable your design teams to explore multiple design approaches so you can stay ahead of customer demands in rapidly changing industries like shale oil and renewable power generation. Quickly arrive at the most cost-effective, innovative and functional products that today’s Energy & Utility Owner-Operators demand to keep their operations both competitive and compliant.

The Energy & Utilities industry is accustomed to technical innovation and change. However, global megatrends such as the rise of alternative energy and prolonged low commodity prices are having a disruptive effect on the entire industry.

For energy equipment OEMs, changes in the competitive landscape and more demanding customer requirements are forcing improvements in functionality and performance while driving down the total cost of ownership. Equipment designs must be smarter, more responsive, and economical, in addition to exceeding durability requirements under more demanding conditions and operating environments. more>

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NXP Rolls Out Radar Development Platform

By Charles Murray – A new reference platform promises to speed the development time of automotive radar devices for adaptive cruise control, automated braking, and automated steering.

NXP Semiconductors N.V., maker of the new platform, says that it provides engineers with a more direct path to production than any previous product.

“They can kickstart their development activities and accelerate the time it takes to develop a product that can be deployed into production vehicles,” Colin Cureton, senior director of product management for ADAS at NXP Semiconductors, told Design News.

NXP is timing the product rollout for a huge anticipated increase in the use of automotive radar systems. Today, radar is employed in automated braking systems that detect pedestrians and cyclists in front of and behind vehicles, as well as in automated emergency steering, cross-traffic detection, and child detection.

In the near future, many vehicles are expected to deploy radar on the front and rear, as well as on all four corners. NXP predicts that overall use of automotive radar will jump from 24 million units shipped worldwide in 2016 to 168 million units in 2025—a seven-fold increase. more>

Updates from Siemens

Smart Products, Smart Manufacturing
Siemens – Next-generation smart products are complex systems of systems that make current development processes inadequate.

Smart factories with smarter, faster and cheaper robots along with additive manufacturing processes are disrupting factories and transforming the manufacturing industry. This requires a new approach to development – a model-based design and manufacturing approach that creates a digital twin and then connects that detailed digital information with people throughout the organization through a digital thread.

This digital twin allows global teams across all disciplines the detailed information they need to evaluate opportunities and predict performance. more>

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Anthropic arrogance

By David P Barash – Welcome to the ‘anthropic principle’, a kind of Goldilocks phenomenon or ‘intelligent design’ for the whole Universe. According to its proponents, the Universe is fine-tuned for human life.

The message is clearly an artificial one and not the result of random noise. Or maybe the Universe itself is alive, and the various physical and mathematical constants are part of its metabolism. Such speculation is great fun, but it’s science fiction, not science.

It should be clear at this point that the anthropic argument readily devolves – or dissolves – into speculative philosophy and even theology. Indeed, it is reminiscent of the ‘God of the gaps’ perspective, in which God is posited whenever science hasn’t (yet) provided an answer.

Calling upon God whenever there is a gap in our scientific understanding may be tempting, but it is not even popular among theologians, because as science grows, the gaps – and thus, God – shrinks. It remains to be seen whether the anthropic principle, in whatever form, succeeds in expanding our sense of ourselves beyond that illuminated by science. I wouldn’t bet on it. more>

Updates from Siemens

Digital Enterprise Industry Solutions for Automotive OEMs
Siemens – Automotive OEMs are remaking themselves in an era of digital disruptions across the industry. Product complexity, technological change, and increasing competition places pressure on OEMs to innovate faster. Leading automakers are increasingly using systems engineering processes that span the domains of mechanical, electrical and software functions to realize the innovation needed for next-gen cars.

Siemens PLM Software solutions are built on open standards to allow for seamless integration across disciplines. This gives automakers the flexibility to digitalize product development, enabling everyone to access a car’s digital twin. more>

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Updates from ITU

Autonomous shipping is making waves
By Kirsten Salyer – The autonomous shipping industry is making waves, as established companies and tech start-ups apply emerging technologies to one of the oldest industries in the world, maritime transport.

With about 90% of the world’s trade carried by sea and ships among the largest contributors to carbon dioxide emissions, autonomous shipping efforts could also support United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goal 7, Affordable and Clean Energy.

Developments in autonomous shipping, such as those that allow ships to deal with weather and currents more efficiently, can lead to fuel savings and fewer emissions, says Päivi Haikkola, Ecosystem Lead of ONE SEA – Autonomous Maritime Ecosystem, a collaboration of experts whose aim is to encourage the creation of an operating autonomous maritime ecosystem by 2025. more>

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