Category Archives: Transportation

Updates from Boeing

Boeing to Showcase the Future of Aerospace at Farnborough International Airshow
Boeing – Boeing (NYSE: BA) today announced its plans to reveal the exciting future of air and space travel at the 2018 Farnborough International Airshow, which takes place July 16-22. From hypersonic travel to the future of autonomous flight to manned space flight, Boeing will visually present the innovations that will revolutionize the way humans travel around the world and into space.

Visitors can immerse themselves in a large 360-degree theater and board next-generation aircraft through virtual and mixed reality devices. The interactive exhibit showcases Boeing’s latest family of aircraft and services, and gives visitors a first look at what the company is developing in its second century of aerospace innovation. more>

Updates from Boeing

The Future is Built Here – Farnborough Airshow 2018
Boeing – The future is here at the Farnborough International Airshow, the industry’s largest air show and aerospace technology exhibition in 2018. Thousands of commercial and defense aerospace professionals will come together July 16-22 at this renowned venue outside London.

The Farnborough Airshow is legendary for its inspiring air display lineup and for showcasing new aerospace technologies. more>

How Japan could soon offer lessons for the Fourth Industrial Revolution

By Murat Sönmez – Leveraging fast-emerging technologies like self-driving cars, artificial intelligence and data-intensive precision medicine to address social challenges is a goal that many countries share. The most successful will have at least two things in common: a strong sense of mission across government, industry and civil society; and the right mix of intellectual and industrial assets to apply to the task.

Japan, I’m convinced, possesses both in abundance.

In recent months, I have worked closely with Japanese government, business and civil society leaders to establish the World Economic Forum Centre for the Fourth Industrial Revolution Japan — the first Centre in the Forum’s new global network to be established outside the United States.

Supported by the Japanese government and businesses, Centre for the Fourth Industrial Revolution Japan will co-design pilot projects to speed up Japan’s response to technological change. The goal is two-fold: First, to help Japan make the most of technology as it confronts critical issues like an aging and shrinking population — part of an ambitious program of social transformation that Japanese leaders are calling Society 5.0.

And second, to create new governance models for other countries to follow. more>

General Motors Sees a Future With Zero Crashes, Zero Emissions, Zero Congestion

By RP Siegel – GM’s 2017 Sustainability Report boldly proclaims a vision of the future in which three of the biggest historical drawbacks of the automobile are completely eliminated. That is to say, there will be “zero crashes, zero emissions, and zero congestion.” This, according to CEO Mary Barra, will be accomplished by a combination of “autonomous, electric, shared, and connected vehicles.”

Design News spoke with David Tulauskas, GM’s Sustainability Director, who elaborated on some of the key messages, strategies and enablers that are embedded in this report. “This report brings together our vision of the future of transportation that has been coming together over the past several years,” Tulauskas said.

He would not say whether or not any of these would be trucks, though we have noted in the past that fuel cells could be a sweet spot for trucks. To get a sense of proportion, Tulauskas said that they typically have between 50-70 vehicles in the pipeline.

The transformation, of course, goes well beyond what any single company can provide. Unless these technologies are developed in conjunction with corresponding changes in areas like the electricity delivery system as well as urban and road infrastructure, this could be a bridge to nowhere. more>

Updates from Siemens

Automotive Software Development
Siemens – Embedded software is driving remarkable new business opportunities in the automotive industry and fueling innovation in connectivity, electrification, and autonomous vehicle development.

However, managing automotive software development complexity is a big challenge. The complexity is driven by the difference between mechanical and software system product development approaches. Most automotive programs are managed in a three- to five-year cycle.

They follow a gate-based development paradigm with strict checkpoints and certifications. Software development, on the other hand, is incredibly fast paced, as it follows agile processes where collaboration and rapid innovation is key.

Typically, development of mechanical and electrical systems are managed within product lifecycle management (PLM) tools, whereas software development is managed with application lifecycle management (ALM) tools. The challenge is to combine these two inherently different product development methodologies. Software and hardware engineers working on their respective ALM and PLM applications must be able to access information across all the lifecycle related processes.

Hardware and software integration and co-development is a major challenge and a key contributor to quality issues, launch delays, and recall related penalties. more>

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Updates from Siemens

Shipbuilding
Siemens – Transform your shipyard into a seamlessly integrated and synchronized enterprise linking designers, engineers, production specialists, support teams, partners and suppliers to optimize performance, maximize lifecycle productivity and sustain competitiveness. Our holistic shipbuilding solution spans the entire shipbuilding enterprise and lifecycle to enable shipbuilders to integrate their organizational knowledge, automate processes throughout the product lifecycle and improve efficiency, accuracy and execution to reduce time-to-delivery.

The increasing complexity of products, development processes, and design teams challenges you to find new tools and methods to deliver greater innovation and higher quality at lower cost. NX product design software from Siemens PLM Software delivers power, efficiency and cost savings that extend beyond the design process to all phases of product development.

Additive manufacturing is changing the way products are designed as well as how they are manufactured, by enabling optimized designs that were previously impossible or too expensive to make. Design, optimize, and build metal and plastic components using the latest additive manufacturing methods. more>

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Updates from Siemens

Automotive manufacturing and autonomous vehicles
By Dave Lauzun – Automotive manufacturing has been happening for a long time, but when most people think of automotive manufacturing, they imagine a moving assembly line. The moving assembly line revolutionized how vehicle manufacturers produce cars, but it wasn’t always the go-to process.

As vehicles were first beginning to be built at the turn of twentieth century, vehicle manufacturers typically built the whole car at once. It was a time-consuming, costly process that kept cars out of most consumers’ hands.

In 1913, over at Ford Motor Company, Henry Ford wanted to cut down on the time and cost associated with building the Model T. He needed to find an efficient way to build this car, and he came up with idea of being able to “productionize” the Model T through a moving assembly line. In this assembly line, the Model T production was broken down into 84 steps, and employees were trained to do just one step.

The results of this change were enormous for Ford Motor Company. The automaker drastically reduced the time it took to build the Model T from 12 hours to 90 minutes. The cost savings in manpower and time to produce the vehicle on the assembly line also meant the company could drop the price of the Model T from $850 to $300.

How will automakers turn their focus away from research and development and toward the mass production of autonomous vehicles? And, how can that mass production be economically viable for their business and for their customers? more>

Updates from GE

Going For Great: In A Deal Valued At $6.5 Billion, GE Jet Engines Will Power American’s New Dreamliner Fleet
By Tomas Kellner – American Airlines, which helped launch GE into commercial aviation 45 years ago, said it would power 47 additional new Boeing 787 with GE Aviation’s GEnx-1B engines. The $6.5 billion deal includes a 20-year service agreement. This order follows a previous order for 42 such planes placed several years ago.

Airlines have ordered more than 2,000 GEnx engines since 2004, when Boeing selected the model for its 787 Dreamliner jets. Eager to save weight and improve efficiency, GE engineers took the GE90, the world’s most powerful jet engine developed a decade earlier, and remodeled it.

The GEnx has already entered the record books. In 2011, a GEnx-1B-powered Dreamliner flew halfway around the world on a tank of gas, then finished the job on the next tank. The journey set a weight-class distance record for the 10,337-nautical mile first leg and a record for quickest around-the-world flight at an astonishing 42 hours and 27 minutes.

What’s next? GE engineers could upgrade the engines with space-age materials called ceramic matrix composites, or CMCs. CMCs can handle temperatures as high as 2,400 degrees Fahrenheit and withstand the punishing forces inside the engines. more>

Updates from Siemens

Digital Enterprise Industry Solutions for Rail Systems
Siemens – Increasing complexity of the rail industry requires systems-driven approaches to product development that combine systems engineering with integrated product definition. Our Digital Enterprise Industry Solutions unify product development with manufacturing to provide functional networking, advanced modeling and simulation, and an intuitive user experience.

Rail transport is a key element in the mobility of communities, moving citizens and goods in comfort and safety while minimizing environmental impact.

Rail transport can be a source of noise, vibration and pollution. It can event present a nuisance or threat to surrounding infrastructure. Whether you are manufacturing train, tram, metro, subway, light rail or monorail systems, our solutions offer a comprehensive, integrated design, simulation and manufacturing environment for developing rail systems.

Managing pass-by-noise of rail transport is a constraint in cities with dense populations. Performance and reliability of rail systems also present operational concerns. Our rail design, simulation and testing solutions optimize noise and vibration comfort.

Our solutions enable you to make smart design decisions so that your rail systems carry people and freight cleanly, efficiently and quietly. more>

A radical proposal to keep your personal data safe

By Richard Stallman – Broader, meaning extending to all surveillance systems, not just Facebook. Deeper, meaning to advance from regulating the use of data to regulating the accumulation of data. Because surveillance is so pervasive, restoring privacy is necessarily a big change, and requires powerful measures.

The surveillance imposed on us today far exceeds that of the Soviet Union. For freedom and democracy’s sake, we need to eliminate most of it. There are so many ways to use data to hurt people that the only safe database is the one that was never collected. Thus, instead of the EU’s approach of mainly regulating how personal data may be used (in its General Data Protection Regulation or GDPR), I propose a law to stop systems from collecting personal data.

The robust way to do that, the way that can’t be set aside at the whim of a government, is to require systems to be built so as not to collect data about a person. The basic principle is that a system must be designed not to collect certain data, if its basic function can be carried out without that data.

Frills on the system, such as the feature of letting a passenger review the list of past journeys, are not part of the basic function, so they can’t justify incorporating any additional surveillance.

What about security? Such systems in areas where the public are admitted must be designed so they cannot track people.

The EU’s GDPR regulations are well-meaning, but do not go very far. It will not deliver much privacy, because its rules are too lax. They permit collecting any data if it is somehow useful to the system, and it is easy to come up with a way to make any particular data useful for something. more>