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Updates from Adobe

Brooke Shaden Connects Through Art

By Alyssa Coppelman – Photographer Brooke Shaden crafts images that are steeped in symbolism. Each image encapsulates a full story, or at least a crucial plot point. It makes sense that she got her start by experimenting with filmmaking—most dubiously when she made her first video at age 13, set to an N’Sync song.

After going to college in order to study filmmaking, Shaden realized she preferred photography, notably because she could work alone and more quickly than when making a film. And while she was able to take elements of her formal filmmaking training and apply them to photography, she is otherwise self-taught.

When searching for ideas to translate into photographs, Shaden loves to explore overarching concepts. “Symbolism and storytelling elements like conflict and characterization are at the core of why I want to create,” she explains. “When I am brainstorming, I often write down keywords—themes, loose ideas—that are occupying my mind in that moment. From there, I write down descriptions of visuals that go with those words in an effort to visually bring about art from the ideas. I focus on location, color, and character, and sometimes props or wardrobe, as well. Once I have the idea, I write down a little paragraph about what the image is, why it is meaningful, and how I plan to technically achieve it.”

Because her planning phase is so thorough, Shaden generally spends only five to fifteen minutes, depending on the image’s complexity, actually shooting. more> https://goo.gl/dXJZsb

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Updates from Adobe

Jennifer Kinon On Taking Chances
By Serena Fox – Jennifer Kinon loves to build big identity systems. “The bigger, the better,” says Kinon, who with partner Bobby Martin co-founded New York-based Original Champions of Design as a firm that specializes in creating cohesive visual identities for brands.

Recently, Kinon embarked on the biggest and most high-profile identity campaign of her career when she took a 16-month hiatus to serve as design director of Hillary for America. Despite the outcome of last year’s presidential election, Kinon and her team of 16 designers were widely lauded for applying a rigorous brand strategy that produced a memorable and unified branding and social media campaign. more> https://goo.gl/tMnXKr

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Updates from Adobe

How to Choose the Right Logo Color
By Terri Stone – “The idea should precede the palette,” says David Airey, a graphic designer and the writer behind Logo Design Love. “An idea will always be more memorable than a color: The bitten apple, the hidden arrow, a smile from a to z.”

Everyone interprets color differently. (I don’t mean color-blindness, although that can be a factor, too.) When you present initial concepts to the client in black and white, you avoid a potential pitfall.

When you and your client have agreed on a concept, it’s time to consider how the competition uses color.

Of course, some clients come to you with established corporate colors. When those colors aren’t effective, designers must walk a delicate line. Hinrichs says, “If they have equity in that color, but you think it doesn’t stand out, try to educate the client as to why they may want a range of that color.

In addition to analyzing the competition, designers must also think about where a logo will appear. Does the color you chose work in all of these situations? more> https://goo.gl/4rAs6Y

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Updates from Adobe

The Geometric Illustrations of Yo Az
By Charles Purdy – The graphic designer and illustrator Yo Az works in a distinctive geometric style, creating beautiful, intricate vector images based on colorful combinations of shapes.

I started out studying visual communication. For me, the best way to illustrate an advertisement was with a drawing or a photograph. During the course of my studies, I began illustrating posters and flyers—I really enjoyed doing that and seemed good at it, and it became apparent that this was where my future was.

I think that, in general, when someone starts drawing, they first try to copy reality. Then, with time, you try to put on paper what you have in your mind. Also, I think the way I use Adobe Illustrator has shaped the way I draw—I’ve evolved by using Illustrator. I think more in terms of geometric shapes and in terms of harmony between different shapes. more> https://goo.gl/gou2oG

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Updates from Adobe

The Hand-Crafted Wonders of Kitiya Palaskas
By Jordan Kushins – Kitiya Palaskas revels in “more is more” excess. Her aesthetic is bright and kitschy, willfully retro but also super fresh.

Check out her site for eye-catching, off-kilter client projects, which include everything from a plush puppet mascot for British band The Wombats, to partyware plates, cups, and more for the We Love Sundays boutique.

Pop by her Instagram feed for quick, colorful glimpses into her latest goings-ons, which often include glitter, good friends, or a cocktail. (Sometimes all at once.) It’s easy to be enchanted with her wares, and Palaskas is clearly busy living her best life; but what, exactly, does that entail?

“I’m quite niche,” she says with a laugh. “And I’ve found it can be hard to explain myself in a way that’s not too obscure, that other people can understand. I had been calling myself a ‘craft-based designer,’ but that doesn’t mean anything to anyone because it’s just a term that I made up.” Instead, she’s going with “stylist and prop designer.” And then some! “I create objects, images, sets, and installations. I write DIYs, I teach workshops, I mentor others.

I do client-based work. The thing that ties them together is that they all have a base in craft, with things that I’ve handmade.” more> https://goo.gl/CPgypd

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Updates from Adobe

By Serena Fox – Imagine wearing the same shoes every day of your life. “For my sister, her wheelchair is an extension of her body,” says designer Ailbhe Keane. “Dressing her wheels is like putting on a new pair of boots.”

That’s the idea behind Izzy Wheels, an Irish company that aims to transform the wheelchair from a medical device into a form of artistic self-expression. Founded by Ailbhe and her sister Isabel Keane, the online shop sells colorful, easily interchanged wheelchair spoke guards that feature designs by illustrators and artists from around the world.

Their tagline, “If you can’t stand up, stand out!” was inspired by Isabel, who was born with spina bifida and is paralyzed from her waist down. Growing up, she was frustrated by how little was available to personalize her chair. “I don’t want my chair to look like it was made in a hospital, I want it to look like a piece of fashion,” says Isabel, who today serves as brand ambassador and spokesperson (no pun intended) for the company that bears her name. more> https://goo.gl/URbUKg

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Updates from Adobe

Make It Impactful: Optimizing Images with Lightroom
Adobe – Lightroom allows you to sort photos by multiple criteria—including file name, date, rating, and color label. KATIE Orlinsky likes to sort and cull photos quickly, applying ratings and colors to her photos using key commands (1 to 5 are ratings; 6 to 9 are colors).

After assigning ratings to her images, Orlinsky isolated only images with a certain rating. Then she put those images in a subfolder (by clicking on the plus sign to the right of Folders and choosing Add Subfolder) and continued reviewing. She finally narrowed her choices down to three and then to one.

GARETH Pon imported Orlinsky’s photo and switched to the Develop module (View > Go To Develop). Before he began making adjustments in the Basic panel, he moved the exposure slider left and right to get a feel for the photo. “Ideally, you want to make sure your image is at a good exposure before you start playing with it and making other adjustments,” he says. more> https://goo.gl/X1nPuj

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Updates from Adobe

Disrupting Domesticity: Julie Blackmon’s Irreverent Take on Small-Town Family Life
By Dan Cowles – Though Julie Blackmon started out as a documentary photographer, originally influenced by her first encounter with the work of Sally Mann, Blackmon’s art has evolved into a more exaggerated reality—highly stylized tableaus, more influenced by fine art than documentary at this point.

Blackmon thinks a lot about her projects before shooting anything, experimenting and evolving her ideas over time. “Sometimes it’s just whatever is around, including props,” she says. “It’s like, ‘Oh, I think I’ll use that book over there.’ Kind of like my nieces and nephews: ‘They’re just hanging out. Maybe I could borrow them.’”

By the time she sets the camera up, she has a pretty good idea of what she’s after. “Once you get all that figured out, that’s really when kind of the fun starts,” she says. And seeing Blackmon in action, one has the sense that there is little boundary between work and play, between directing the kids and playing dress-up with them. Blackmon shoots most of her material in and around the same Springfield, Missouri, neighborhood she grew up in, and she uses her friends and family as her subjects. more> https://goo.gl/Oq9KE9

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Updates from Adobe

Having Fun with Every Frame
By Dustin Driver – Emanuele Colombo grew up in the heart of Alps, in his own words, “spending time building spaceships with Legos and dreaming of becoming a paleontologist.” But he eventually left his dreams of dinosaur digging behind and instead focused on digital storytelling.

After graduation, he landed a gig with a creative agency in Milan. He honed his skills and fine-tuned his sense of aesthetics, motion, and timing. “I’ve always been interested in creativity in all its forms, from music to photography to videos,” he says. “That has helped me develop a good aesthetic sense and grow my creativity, and gain some technical experience.”

He left the agency behind and began teaching himself how to animate using a combination of Adobe Illustrator and After Effects. He learned from Adobe tutorials and how-tos he found on YouTube, and he read every article about animation that he could get his hands on. He worked on personal projects—short videos and looping GIFs that he shared on his Vimeo page—to develop his skills. Some of them became viral hits, and soon he was getting job offers from around the world.

Today, Colombo works for big brands like MTV, Google, IBM, Yahoo, Airbnb, American Express, ESPN, and Saatchi & Saatchi. more> https://goo.gl/Z63cZy

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Updates from Adobe

For Travel Photographer Dan Tom, It’s About the Journey
By Charles Purdy – Dan Tom describes his photography as “travel with some lifestyle elements.” He says, “For me, travel and exploring new places are what inspire me the most and what I gravitate toward when I shoot. This is what motivates me to buy a plane ticket to somewhere new and just go.”

Tom’s love of travel, photography, and the combination of the two was awakened on a trip he took almost ten years ago. He explains, “I went to South Africa for a two-week mission trip, working with kids in an orphanage in a small town. We were all assigned roles, and I was assigned to document the trip.

I created a video and took pictures, and that’s when I started discovering some photographic techniques—simple things, like that portraits worked better in soft light or shade rather than direct sun—and I just really enjoyed documenting our trip.

This is where I discovered my love for travel, as well as for documenting and just telling stories with photography.” more> https://goo.gl/MKTRaV

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