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The Simple Life
By Jenny Carless –By day a graphic designer, by night a nature photographer, Anders Bundgaard focuses on simplicity, no matter the medium.

Bundgaard’s interest in graphic design was first piqued during an internship at an advertising agency. After finishing school, he sought out a series of courses—including year-long programs in print and reproduction, drawing, advertising, and multimedia—to develop the skills he needed.

At 21, Bundgaard moved from Denmark to London in search of new and interesting work. “My first job here was for a company that designed film posters,” he says. “I really liked the work and continued in that direction.”

Today, Bundgaard’s graphic design work is mainly aimed at the film industry. His portfolio includes film posters, motion graphics for trailers, and title sequences.

Whether working in print or motion, his preferred style is simple and clean.

“I try to get to the core of a project and then distill it down to the bare minimum to communicate the idea,” he says. more>

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By Cristina Daura – llustrator Cristina Daura grew up steps away from an amusement park. A trail led straight from her house to the top of Barcelona’s Tibidabo mountain, where a large church looms over a colorful theme park full of twinkly lights, charming roller coasters, creepy vintage animatronics, and sweet-smelling air. Daura’s family held an annual pass, so she could pop in any time. Today, the artist’s playful but dark illustrations are clearly inspired by the kitsch, the bright colors, and her memories of this extraordinary place.

A bit of an outcast when she was younger, Daura found her community at comic book stores. Always with a sketchbook in hand, she thought she wanted to design comic books for a living. When she found out that illustration work paid better, she switched gears—but she continues to take inspiration from the way comics tell a story.

Daura also uses symbols and an intentionally limited color palette to communicate, with many symbols repeated in multiple works. With the symbols, Daura has created her own representational language—and because she doesn’t like to explain her work, the viewer is left to interpret meaning on their own. more>

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The Courage to Follow a Dream
By Jenny Carless – Changing professions takes courage, hard work, and a little bit of luck, as Lisbon-based illustrator Tiago Galo knows very well: a few years ago, he took a leap of faith and turned a hobby into a successful career.

Working as an architect but still harboring a life-long dream to be an illustrator or comic book artist, Galo entered a major comic book competition in Portugal—and won.

“I took that as a sign that I should embrace my dream once and for all,” he says.

The decision seems to have been a good one, if measured by the clients he has attracted in the past four years—including Google, National Geographic Travel, GQ, Time Out, and the Financial Times. Galo also sells his work as a premium contributor on Adobe Stock.

Galo is self-taught, because when he was starting out as a young artist, few options for studying illustration existed in Portugal.

“The only possibility was to attend some workshops here and there and start your own path,” he says. “That worked well for me, as I was pursuing my own style and techniques.”

Galo’s style is simple and colorful—featuring geometric shapes and exaggerated proportions. more>

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Bailey Sullivan Is Busy
By Terri Stone – Bailey Sullivan is a graphic designer for WeWork, a company that rents shared workspaces. Part of her job involves traveling to WeWork offices around the world and embellishing them with her art on walls, rugs, signs, sculptures, benches, and more. On top of globe-hopping for work, she also juggles freelance clients and personal projects.

“It’s a hard balance of wanting to be creating all of the time while not neglecting your relationships and personal health,” Sullivan says. She’s learned that adding a “buffer day”—or two—into timelines for freelance projects helps maintain her sanity.

Sullivan’s pieces sometimes read as folk art for the modern age. “I’m obsessed with old European floral illustrations,” she says. “My husband spent a few years living in Budapest as a child; awhile back I was searching online for something special from that area for him and I came across all of these amazing vintage Hungarian floral stamps and embroideries. I instantly connected with that imagery and how graphic and bright the flowers were and how they were stylized in a way that feels more decorative than a realistic still life.” more>

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A Catalogue of Imaginary Beings
By Serena Fox – Imagine a world of monumental mythical beings dressed in surreal costumes: people made of mountains, city streets, rough-sawn logs, or plumes of steam; people who wear houses, bird wings, crystalline geodes, or even the moon.

That was the vision of collage artist Johanna Goodman in 2015 when she embarked on A Catalogue of Imaginary Beings, a personal project inspired by magical realism, surrealism, and symbolism that explores the role of the individual in fashion, history, and the artistic imagination. Four years later, the project has grown into a series of moret than 350 playful and strangely iconic images, and has led to a New York Foundation for the Arts fellowship, commissions from National Geographic and the New York Metropolitan Transport Authority, and ad campaigns ranging from skateboards to West Elm home furnishings.

“I keep thinking it’s run its course, but it hasn’t,” says Goodman. “I have not run out of ideas, and I keep getting more interest from the outside world.”

A diverse artist, Goodman works in paint, ink, and digital collage, and she brings more than 20 years’ experience in editorial illustration and portraiture to the project. A lifelong freelancer based in Nyack, New York, she creates illustrations for newspapers and magazines, book covers, hotel chains, and product advertising. Her work has appeared in the New Yorker, Time, Rolling Stone, Le Monde, the Los Angeles Times, Smithsonian, and the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. The Imaginary Beings are her current passion.

The basic concept is straightforward: a single figure—defined by head, arms, and feet—dressed in unusual objects and placed in a surreal setting. But the resulting images are both humorous and oddly archetypal and statuesque, like pop-culture totems.

Goodman takes photographs of everyday objects and landscapes, cuts them into pieces, and arranges them to “clothe” her characters in bizarre and beautiful outfits. She plays with cumbersome proportions, favors out-of-context facial expressions, and adds innocuous items like iPhones or coffee cups as if they were talismans. more>

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A Creative Stretch with Joe Cavazos
By Serena Fox – Sometimes we all need a creative reset. Whether it’s a summer slump, the December doldrums, or just a grueling workload, it’s easy for artists to get into a rut and lose touch with their creative process..

Last winter, art director/designer Joe Cavazos was feeling the creative blues. So he set himself a challenge: Create something fun for 30 minutes a day for one month, record the process, and post the time-lapse on Instagram. The result was far more than he’d expected: He invented a new circular stretch effect in Adobe Photoshop; boosted his Instagram following seven-fold; met new designers and clients online; and—most importantly—reconnected with the playful side of Photoshop that got him into the business in the first place.

“I started recording my illustration process a long time ago,” says Cavazos. “I don’t have the best memory, so it’s kind of a digital notebook that lets me go back and say, ‘How did I get to here?’ For me, creative warm-ups are a time to do passion project work, to spend 30 minutes to an hour creating something for the fun of it and recording that process. I would do those warm-ups every once in a while, especially when I got into a funk or when I was doing a lot of logo design or branding work, which is careful and exacting and very different than just playing with Photoshop.”

“And then,” he continues, “I decided to challenge myself to do it once a day, for a whole month. That forced me to go through my whole bag of tricks, just to get something done. For me, it’s helpful to have that accountability of posting every day, whether what I do is good or not—it’s part of not being afraid to learn.” Cavazos didn’t land on what he calls the Circular Pixel Stretch effect right away. He started by playing with stretched pixels, seeing what colors he could pull and how he could manipulate the pixels. “Then I thought about using Polar Coordinates—which is an old filter that’s been in Photoshop forever—and I figured out how to marry the two. That looked cool, so I just kept pushing it further and trying out different ways I could use it,” he says.

Because Cavazos recorded and posted his process every day, you can see his progression chronologically if you scroll through his Instagram.
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Reality-Defying Photo Composites Master the Impossible
By Jordan Kushins – Juan José Egúsquiza is based in Brooklyn, New York, but he spends much of his time as a man of the world. From Paris to San Francisco to Barcelona to Lucerne and beyond, the Lima, Peru-born multimedia artist and Adobe Creative Resident makes his way across the globe with his camera in hand. While exploring, he captures ordinary moments with a click, and these images become the basis for what he calls “Impossible Stories”: brain-bending composites that challenge the way we relate to and interpret our surroundings.

When I was young, I played music—percussion, mostly—and was in a band with my twin brother, who’s also an artist. He was so creative, and making things all the time, often grabbing trash and turning it into sculptures or instruments. That idea of recycling—of taking elements that were meant to be for something and then using them to build something else—was super, super cool to me. At some point I realized I wanted to start creating my own special things as well.

I was 19 or 20 when I first started taking pictures. I’d be traveling, mostly alone, and all of a sudden I’d be somewhere I’ve never been before: walking around, seeing new things, observing ordinary moments. I’ve always liked those the most; like, someone throwing a cookie away in a garbage can. Once you take a picture of it, it becomes something totally different.

At first, I wouldn’t edit my images at all, but eventually I started thinking: “What if I grabbed one element from this image and put it on something else?” Now that kind of photo compositing is a daily practice. more>

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Maria Brzozowska Makes Magical Realities
By Jenny Carless – “My aim is to empower my audience as active storytellers,” Maria Brzozowska says. “It’s very valuable for me when my audiences are able to relate to my illustrations and create or find pieces of their own stories. It’s like an invisible connection between us.”

The Ankara-based artist and book illustrator describes her art as a merging point of fantasy and reality—what she calls magical realism.

“My illustrations allow the audience to encounter new, unknown lands where there is no definite time or space, and in doing that, return to a sense of possibility that we lose as we grow up,” she says.

Brzozowska grew up in a household of creatives, so in many ways her career was an inevitability, she says.

“I remember being encouraged to look at the world through different perspectives and to ask myself ‘what if?’,” she recalls. “Many of the answers to that question I found in the endless possibilities of being a visual storyteller.”

She spent time experimenting with various media before finding a balance between a digital and traditional styles. She started with a digital approach, but with practice and patience developed her manual skills. “The more confident I became, the easier it was for me to do most of my work by hand,” she says. more>

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Creative Types: Stefan Sagmeister and Jessica Walsh
By Carolyn Gregoire – The creative fuel behind the most powerful duo in the design world today is simple: Boredom.

For Austrian-born Stefan Sagmeister and native New Yorker Jessica Walsh, designers and creative directors of New York-based firm Sagmeister & Walsh, that shared creative restless has led to a collaboration based on the ethos that you can—and indeed, must—be free to follow your interests wherever they lead.

Boredom can be good for creativity—if you do it right. The upside of a restless mind is the fertile ground for creative exploration.

Sagmeister and Walsh embody a personality trait that psychologists have found to be at the very heart of creativity: openness to experience. Psychologists say that openness is the strongest and most consistent personality trait that predicts creative achievement in the arts and sciences.

Openness to experience speaks to our motivation to engage with ideas and emotions: to seek truth and beauty, excitement and novelty. The act of exploring often provides the raw material for true innovation.

People who are high in openness tend to be imaginative, curious, perceptive, artistic, introspective, and intellectual. They’re driven to explore their internal worlds of ideas, emotions, sensations, and fantasies and, outwardly, to constantly seek out and make meaning of new information and experiences.

Research has shown that those who are high in openness to experience actually benefit creatively from the experience of boredom—it leads them to generate more and better ideas—while those who are less open don’t experience the same creative benefits of boredom.

“I love learning and doing new things,” says Walsh. “That keeps things fresh and constantly evolving.” more>

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5 & 3/4 Questions
By Erin Robinson – I am in my head a lot…a perpetual daydreamer of sorts. It’s quite a high when I get truly inspired. My mind goes into overdrive, and I can barely physically keep up! I tend to scribble numerous miscellaneous thoughts on Post-its and on my left hand.

My work, I usually describe as sometimes hauntingly beautiful, bold, graphic, vibrant, textured, and always magical. As a woman of color, I also like to illustrate women that represent me. Living in Brooklyn for numerous years, I found myself surrounded by some of the most incredibly stunning black, brown, and beige women from a variety of different places and different cultures…full of eccentricity.

When I draw for myself, I tend to create illustrations with a story behind them. The stories usually pull from fairy-esque things I believed in as a little girl. You’ll notice hints of red string and lotuses through many of those pieces. I like adding bits of symbolism.

I’ve been drawing since I can remember. My parents are both very creative and made sure I had the tools to nurture my animated mind.

I went into corporate America as a fashion design VP for children. I found myself stifled after a period of time and felt like I wasn’t really expressing who I truly was inside…what my true artistic capabilities were. I felt like I had climbed the corporate ladder as far as I could go, and after a sabbatical, a lot of thinking and stepping out of fear, and encouragement from a handful of friends, I decided to really share my art world. more>

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