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Updates from Adobe

The Geometric Illustrations of Yo Az
By Charles Purdy – The graphic designer and illustrator Yo Az works in a distinctive geometric style, creating beautiful, intricate vector images based on colorful combinations of shapes.

I started out studying visual communication. For me, the best way to illustrate an advertisement was with a drawing or a photograph. During the course of my studies, I began illustrating posters and flyers—I really enjoyed doing that and seemed good at it, and it became apparent that this was where my future was.

I think that, in general, when someone starts drawing, they first try to copy reality. Then, with time, you try to put on paper what you have in your mind. Also, I think the way I use Adobe Illustrator has shaped the way I draw—I’ve evolved by using Illustrator. I think more in terms of geometric shapes and in terms of harmony between different shapes. more> https://goo.gl/gou2oG

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Updates from Adobe

The Hand-Crafted Wonders of Kitiya Palaskas
By Jordan Kushins – Kitiya Palaskas revels in “more is more” excess. Her aesthetic is bright and kitschy, willfully retro but also super fresh.

Check out her site for eye-catching, off-kilter client projects, which include everything from a plush puppet mascot for British band The Wombats, to partyware plates, cups, and more for the We Love Sundays boutique.

Pop by her Instagram feed for quick, colorful glimpses into her latest goings-ons, which often include glitter, good friends, or a cocktail. (Sometimes all at once.) It’s easy to be enchanted with her wares, and Palaskas is clearly busy living her best life; but what, exactly, does that entail?

“I’m quite niche,” she says with a laugh. “And I’ve found it can be hard to explain myself in a way that’s not too obscure, that other people can understand. I had been calling myself a ‘craft-based designer,’ but that doesn’t mean anything to anyone because it’s just a term that I made up.” Instead, she’s going with “stylist and prop designer.” And then some! “I create objects, images, sets, and installations. I write DIYs, I teach workshops, I mentor others.

I do client-based work. The thing that ties them together is that they all have a base in craft, with things that I’ve handmade.” more> https://goo.gl/CPgypd

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Updates from Adobe

By Serena Fox – Imagine wearing the same shoes every day of your life. “For my sister, her wheelchair is an extension of her body,” says designer Ailbhe Keane. “Dressing her wheels is like putting on a new pair of boots.”

That’s the idea behind Izzy Wheels, an Irish company that aims to transform the wheelchair from a medical device into a form of artistic self-expression. Founded by Ailbhe and her sister Isabel Keane, the online shop sells colorful, easily interchanged wheelchair spoke guards that feature designs by illustrators and artists from around the world.

Their tagline, “If you can’t stand up, stand out!” was inspired by Isabel, who was born with spina bifida and is paralyzed from her waist down. Growing up, she was frustrated by how little was available to personalize her chair. “I don’t want my chair to look like it was made in a hospital, I want it to look like a piece of fashion,” says Isabel, who today serves as brand ambassador and spokesperson (no pun intended) for the company that bears her name. more> https://goo.gl/URbUKg

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Updates from Adobe

Make It Impactful: Optimizing Images with Lightroom
Adobe – Lightroom allows you to sort photos by multiple criteria—including file name, date, rating, and color label. KATIE Orlinsky likes to sort and cull photos quickly, applying ratings and colors to her photos using key commands (1 to 5 are ratings; 6 to 9 are colors).

After assigning ratings to her images, Orlinsky isolated only images with a certain rating. Then she put those images in a subfolder (by clicking on the plus sign to the right of Folders and choosing Add Subfolder) and continued reviewing. She finally narrowed her choices down to three and then to one.

GARETH Pon imported Orlinsky’s photo and switched to the Develop module (View > Go To Develop). Before he began making adjustments in the Basic panel, he moved the exposure slider left and right to get a feel for the photo. “Ideally, you want to make sure your image is at a good exposure before you start playing with it and making other adjustments,” he says. more> https://goo.gl/X1nPuj

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Updates from Adobe

Disrupting Domesticity: Julie Blackmon’s Irreverent Take on Small-Town Family Life
By Dan Cowles – Though Julie Blackmon started out as a documentary photographer, originally influenced by her first encounter with the work of Sally Mann, Blackmon’s art has evolved into a more exaggerated reality—highly stylized tableaus, more influenced by fine art than documentary at this point.

Blackmon thinks a lot about her projects before shooting anything, experimenting and evolving her ideas over time. “Sometimes it’s just whatever is around, including props,” she says. “It’s like, ‘Oh, I think I’ll use that book over there.’ Kind of like my nieces and nephews: ‘They’re just hanging out. Maybe I could borrow them.’”

By the time she sets the camera up, she has a pretty good idea of what she’s after. “Once you get all that figured out, that’s really when kind of the fun starts,” she says. And seeing Blackmon in action, one has the sense that there is little boundary between work and play, between directing the kids and playing dress-up with them. Blackmon shoots most of her material in and around the same Springfield, Missouri, neighborhood she grew up in, and she uses her friends and family as her subjects. more> https://goo.gl/Oq9KE9

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Updates from Adobe

Having Fun with Every Frame
By Dustin Driver – Emanuele Colombo grew up in the heart of Alps, in his own words, “spending time building spaceships with Legos and dreaming of becoming a paleontologist.” But he eventually left his dreams of dinosaur digging behind and instead focused on digital storytelling.

After graduation, he landed a gig with a creative agency in Milan. He honed his skills and fine-tuned his sense of aesthetics, motion, and timing. “I’ve always been interested in creativity in all its forms, from music to photography to videos,” he says. “That has helped me develop a good aesthetic sense and grow my creativity, and gain some technical experience.”

He left the agency behind and began teaching himself how to animate using a combination of Adobe Illustrator and After Effects. He learned from Adobe tutorials and how-tos he found on YouTube, and he read every article about animation that he could get his hands on. He worked on personal projects—short videos and looping GIFs that he shared on his Vimeo page—to develop his skills. Some of them became viral hits, and soon he was getting job offers from around the world.

Today, Colombo works for big brands like MTV, Google, IBM, Yahoo, Airbnb, American Express, ESPN, and Saatchi & Saatchi. more> https://goo.gl/Z63cZy

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Updates from Adobe

For Travel Photographer Dan Tom, It’s About the Journey
By Charles Purdy – Dan Tom describes his photography as “travel with some lifestyle elements.” He says, “For me, travel and exploring new places are what inspire me the most and what I gravitate toward when I shoot. This is what motivates me to buy a plane ticket to somewhere new and just go.”

Tom’s love of travel, photography, and the combination of the two was awakened on a trip he took almost ten years ago. He explains, “I went to South Africa for a two-week mission trip, working with kids in an orphanage in a small town. We were all assigned roles, and I was assigned to document the trip.

I created a video and took pictures, and that’s when I started discovering some photographic techniques—simple things, like that portraits worked better in soft light or shade rather than direct sun—and I just really enjoyed documenting our trip.

This is where I discovered my love for travel, as well as for documenting and just telling stories with photography.” more> https://goo.gl/MKTRaV

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Updates from Adobe

Take 10: Zesty
By Terri Stone – As with our previous Take 10 Challenges, we gave the duo ten images and a theme—in this case, the word zesty. True to form, Leta Sobierajski and Wade Jeffree rewrote the challenge rules, rejecting some of the original images and choosing others. “Questioning the brief is always going to lead you to more interesting places,” Jeffree says.

They began the challenge by contemplating the meaning of zesty. “It speaks to energy and food, and we eat a lot and have a lot of energy,” cracks Jeffree. Sobierajski adds, “It resonates with our personalities. It’s a little zingy.”

The designers usually include physical elements in their work, even when the final deliverables are digital. It was clear from their initial sketch that the Take 10 challenge would be no exception.

Sobierajski and Jeffree envisioned a dimensional abstract landscape, taking structural inspiration from Joan Miró, Pablo Picasso, Henry Moore, Barbara Hepworth, and Oskar Schlemmer, and working with ideas of Cubism, Dada, Bauhaus, and modernism. They identified new Adobe Stock assets that fit their notions of what zesty means; then they moved on to building the abstract shapes out of thick foam core covered in clay. They also designed suits that would render their bodies as abstract as the set. more> https://goo.gl/xPDk95

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Updates from Adobe

5 Illustration Trends for 2017
By Terry Hemphill – Illustrators whose work combines found imagery and traditional illustration in a conceptual, collage style are in high demand, according to Marlena Torzecka, president of Marlena Agency, an illustration and art agency in Princeton, New Jersey.

“Time is so valuable now, there’s often only one or two days to produce a piece for publication, making it nearly impossible to send a photographer to do a shoot for a story,” says Torzecka. “For example, for an editorial illustration about a breaking political story, it might mean photographing several people together who may not even be in the same location. It’s much easier to use existing photos to tell a new story.”

But collage also provides a wide-open playing field for illustrators to explore and mix ideas and concepts to produce images with a special power and appeal for the viewer. more> https://goo.gl/0je6O7

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Updates from Adobe

The Infinity Wall
By Charles Purdy – Inspired by the event space’s interior design—which involved curvilinear wood elements and sculptural wooden columns—the team came up with the “Infinity” theme.

“The interior had planes of wood, and there was a beautiful Zaha Hadid bench that looked like a tree trunk made of slats of wood,” says Vincent Rogozyk. “For this reason, we started designing with slats. The scale of the wall informed the scale of the graphics—the idea was to make the whole thing look like a giant object.”

Bałauszko and Michał Czubak brought the designers’ sketches to life, turning the biomorphic and geometric shapes into polished motion graphics. The final work comprised four basic scenes of abstract 3D kinetic animations that were programmed to morph and transition in a loop. “We designed using 3D software and Adobe After Effects CC, with the help of an offsite render farm,” says Rogozyk. “We definitely tested the limits of the hotel’s Internet connection.” more> https://goo.gl/JzQHRZ

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