Tag Archives: Adobe

Updates from Adobe

Variable Fonts Are the Future of Web Type
By Mandy Michael – A variable font is a single file that acts like multiple fonts. Variable fonts can improve page-load times, but their appeal goes way beyond that: Site visitors get an improved reading experience, and designers get greater creative freedom.

While it’s still early days, some software applications—including the latest Illustrator and Photoshop—and many web browsers do support the technology, and more will follow. It’s a good time to understand how variable fonts work and how to use them in your web designs.

Inventive type designers aren’t restricting themselves to expected variations, such as weight, width, or italic. They’re creating variations that address effect, readability, and style. more>

Related>

Updates from Adobe

Getting into Travel Photography: Find the Details
By Jordana Wright – Look at a photograph with an interesting texture and it might give you the impulse to touch it.

Examine a photograph filled with pattern, and your brain may start to extrapolate that pattern or perceive movement in it. Both sensations are common and heighten the connection between photograph and viewer. We have an innate level of comfort with what we can touch and visually understand, so images with texture and pattern draw us in and make us pay attention.

When photographing Patterns, gear is probably the least important part of the equation. Patterns as a subject won’t dictate what lens to use—instead you’ll find yourself choosing a lens based on the scale of that particular Pattern. If you wanted to photograph the Pattern of sandpaper, you’d need to use a macro lens or even a microscope to draw out the dimensionality of the grain. more>

Related>

Updates from Adobe

Framing the Story: Animator Jocie Juritz
By Scott Kirkwood – London-based animator Jocie Juritz spends her days explaining complicated subjects—for instance, the impact of false memories, the history of the color white, and the science behind nanomolecular genetic switches—all in three minutes or less.

She started out with a few cat GIFs posted on Tumblr, and those led to a call from the Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce (RSA)—sort of a British version of TED.

Juritz wasn’t always sure she would become an animator. When her coursework at Kingston University required that she choose between the illustration track and the animation track, she was stuck: She’d always struggled to pack enough information into a single image, but she didn’t know if she was cut out for the laborious, time-intensive work of animation. Her professors encouraged her to give animation a trial run, and she soon realized that the art form contained many of the things she’d loved even as a child: drama, performance, characters, and storytelling—all with words, music, and sound effects.

Given the complex and often dense subject matter they deal with, Juritz’s short videos have garnered a surprising number of views on Vimeo and other outlets. It started with those cat GIFs (inspired by her own cats, Etta and Ziggy), which got the attention of editors at Tumblr. more>

Related>

Updates from Adobe

WALL TOGETHER NOW
By Jordan Kushins – Las Vegas is known for its garish signage: flashy, flamboyant, all-neon-all-the-time. But now an entirely different kind of marquee has stolen the spotlight. It’s more than 16 feet long, just under ten feet high, and almost five feet deep. It weighs a whopping 770 pounds and is composed of nearly 50 modular MDF forms.

It was meticulously designed in Adobe Illustrator CC, built by hand in England, shipped in pieces across the ocean, then reconstructed in Nevada. And it’s greeting participants at the Adobe Summit.

For the past five years, Adobe has worked with artists on the conference identity, which corresponds to an annual theme. This year’s theme is “experience,” and creative director Angela Fisher was inspired to go beyond 2D constraints to bring the theme to life. “I started thinking, ‘What if the identity was a physical structure?’ A camera panning around, and in and out, could reveal a kind of experience within the branding itself.”

She began making paper models at home on the weekends to explore two facets of the idea. These geometric forms and patterns became building blocks—like DIY Legos—that took on the feel of an abstract cityscape in one, and the shape of an “X” in the other. They were promising, but the concept wasn’t quite there yet. more>

Related>

Updates from Adobe

Designed for Speed: Jordon Bourgeault’s Airbrush Artwork
By Charles Purdy – Jordon Bourgeault (the owner and founder of JBo Airbrush) paints on surfaces of all kinds: motorcycles, guitars, shoes, human bodies, and a lot more—surfaces as large as three-story murals and as small as glasses frames. His business is growing fast, and his recent work on Olympian skeleton riders’ helmets has caught the attention of an international audience.

Bourgeault says he drew “all the time” as a kid and teenager, and he took up airbrushing as a hobby when he was introduced to it through a job as an automotive painter. That hobby led him to a job painting sets and props for films and events, then to many side projects, and eventually to opening his own studio about eight years ago.

These days, commissions of all kinds keep him very busy, but he has a special interest in painting hockey goalie masks and helmets for athletes, including skeleton riders. more>

Related>

Updates from Adobe

Head for the Hills with Kopernikk

By Charles Purdy – A love of the outdoors is plainly evident in Kopernikk’s photography, and he comes by it naturally, having grown up on a farm near the Czech city of Pardubice, which he still calls home—that is, when he’s not on the road for a photography expedition. In fact, it was a 2014 trip to the Czech Republic’s Giant Mountains that set Kopernikk firmly on a path to making his living as a photographer.

He remembers, “In November 2014, my friend Jirka invited me to Špindlerův Mlýn in our Giant Mountains. The weather was so magical—I was like Alice in Wonderland, and I made hundreds and hundreds of photos on my mobile phone…. This day changed everything, and I knew then what I wanted to do with my life. It’s also the reason I have Sitka, my Czechoslovakian Wolfdog—I’ve always loved wolves, and when I started traveling I decided I wanted to have my own ‘wolf’ as a travel buddy.” more>

Related>

Updates from Adobe

Maya Patterson and the Craft of UX
By Jordan Kushins, Maya Patterson – I’m a product designer at Facebook. If I could rename this kind of job, I would call it “digital product designer” because we’re not building tangible things—we’re focusing on web experiences; it all started with desktop, then laptop, then mobile devices, and then on to AR and VR and all of these developing spaces.

But essentially my job is to take care of users, to dig into their needs and behaviors, and build a digital system that helps them accomplish their goals. Depending on who I’m working for, that could be anything from intense data infographic systems to designing a way to get a trunk of clothes sent to your house (which was my last job). Now it’s designing different pieces of the Facebook experience.

I actually think that soft skills are more important than technical ones for UX designers. The biggest two assets in my opinion are the ability to communicate and a sense of empathy.

So I watched people who could communicate very well. Writing is important because it helps you to think in a structured manner and articulate yourself and your ideas. Speaking, presenting, storytelling: these are all essential. People who can tune in, listen, read body language, and get down to the core of how people are responding and reacting to something they’ve created—and who are able to receive feedback—are going to excel. more>

Related>

Updates from Adobe

Brooke Shaden Connects Through Art

By Alyssa Coppelman – Photographer Brooke Shaden crafts images that are steeped in symbolism. Each image encapsulates a full story, or at least a crucial plot point. It makes sense that she got her start by experimenting with filmmaking—most dubiously when she made her first video at age 13, set to an N’Sync song.

After going to college in order to study filmmaking, Shaden realized she preferred photography, notably because she could work alone and more quickly than when making a film. And while she was able to take elements of her formal filmmaking training and apply them to photography, she is otherwise self-taught.

When searching for ideas to translate into photographs, Shaden loves to explore overarching concepts. “Symbolism and storytelling elements like conflict and characterization are at the core of why I want to create,” she explains. “When I am brainstorming, I often write down keywords—themes, loose ideas—that are occupying my mind in that moment. From there, I write down descriptions of visuals that go with those words in an effort to visually bring about art from the ideas. I focus on location, color, and character, and sometimes props or wardrobe, as well. Once I have the idea, I write down a little paragraph about what the image is, why it is meaningful, and how I plan to technically achieve it.”

Because her planning phase is so thorough, Shaden generally spends only five to fifteen minutes, depending on the image’s complexity, actually shooting. more> https://goo.gl/dXJZsb

Related>

Updates from Adobe

Jennifer Kinon On Taking Chances
By Serena Fox – Jennifer Kinon loves to build big identity systems. “The bigger, the better,” says Kinon, who with partner Bobby Martin co-founded New York-based Original Champions of Design as a firm that specializes in creating cohesive visual identities for brands.

Recently, Kinon embarked on the biggest and most high-profile identity campaign of her career when she took a 16-month hiatus to serve as design director of Hillary for America. Despite the outcome of last year’s presidential election, Kinon and her team of 16 designers were widely lauded for applying a rigorous brand strategy that produced a memorable and unified branding and social media campaign. more> https://goo.gl/tMnXKr

Related>

Updates from Adobe

How to Choose the Right Logo Color
By Terri Stone – “The idea should precede the palette,” says David Airey, a graphic designer and the writer behind Logo Design Love. “An idea will always be more memorable than a color: The bitten apple, the hidden arrow, a smile from a to z.”

Everyone interprets color differently. (I don’t mean color-blindness, although that can be a factor, too.) When you present initial concepts to the client in black and white, you avoid a potential pitfall.

When you and your client have agreed on a concept, it’s time to consider how the competition uses color.

Of course, some clients come to you with established corporate colors. When those colors aren’t effective, designers must walk a delicate line. Hinrichs says, “If they have equity in that color, but you think it doesn’t stand out, try to educate the client as to why they may want a range of that color.

In addition to analyzing the competition, designers must also think about where a logo will appear. Does the color you chose work in all of these situations? more> https://goo.gl/4rAs6Y

Related>