Tag Archives: Broadband

Updates from ITU

How can we ensure safety and public trust​ in AI for automated and assisted driving?
ITU News – Cars are becoming increasingly automated. Drivers already benefit from a wide range of advanced driver-assistance systems (ADAS), such as lane keeping, adaptive cruise control, collision warning, and blind spot warning, which are gradually becoming standard features on most vehicles.

Today’s automated systems are taking over an increasing amount of responsibility for the driving task. It is expected that soon, sensors will take the place of human impulse, and artificial intelligence (AI) will substitute for human intelligence.

This process is defined through various level steps, from low levels of automation where the driver retains overall control of the vehicle in level 1, to a fully-autonomous system in level 5.

10 years ago, manufacturers predicted many cars on today’s roads would be fully automated, but it still remains a distant future for the automotive industry. At the recent Future Networked Car Symposium 2020 at ITU Headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland, top experts joined a panel entitled ‘AI for autonomous and assisted driving – how to ensure safety and public trust’ to discuss the progress and the prospects for vehicles that drive themselves – and how we might achieve this future. more>

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Updates from Ciena

Single-wave 400G across 4,000km? Yes – with Ciena’s new Waveserver 5.
Ciena’s popular family of Waveserver products just got a new member – Waveserver 5. With tunable capacity up to 800G and support for 400GbE services at any distance, learn how Waveserver 5 is already setting new industry benchmarks – in live networks.

By Kent Jordan – Two mega-trends have been driving rapid innovation in optical networks. Advanced coherent technology brings the promise of greater network capacity, now reaching up to 800G across short links and 400G at distance. At the same time, new compact modular platforms promise greater density, reduced footprint and lower energy consumption.

What if you could combine this incredible performance and awesome density into one device? Sounds too good to be true, right?

Well not anymore. Ciena’s most advanced coherent technology, WaveLogicTM 5 Extreme, has arrived in the newest member of our Waveserver family of interconnect platforms: Waveserver 5. And, it’s bringing the performance you need, packaged in a compact and efficient footprint.

Combining the world’s most innovative coherent chipset with the simple, server-like operational model the Waveserver family is known for, Waveserver 5 provides network operators with industry-leading transport economics for high-capacity, high-growth applications.

Internet2 will be one of Ciena’s first customers to deploy Waveserver 5. They are building out their next-generation research and education (R&E) network across the U.S. and they have selected Ciena’s best, most flexible, open and highest-performance technologies to do the job. more>

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Updates from Ciena

Building the Adaptive Network – starting with silicon
The journey to the Adaptive Network for network operators is not a linear path and involves managing the deployment of a range of new technologies. Key to this journey is the deployment of a programmable infrastructure. Patricia Bower explores coherent DSP design – one of the primary tools network equipment designers have in order to enable programmability and flexibility – and its significance for network transformations.
By Patricia Bower – New bandwidth-intensive content and applications, along with a massive proliferation of connected devices, will place heavy demands on communications networks going forward. To prepare for this, providers must transform their networks though the implementation of new hardware and software solutions. The Adaptive NetworkTM is the ultimate goal and consists of three main elements – a programmable packet and optical infrastructure to connect network elements; an analytics and intelligence layer to analyze and predict network behavior; and software control and automation to simplify end-to-end management across multi-vendor, multi-domain networks.

A programmable infrastructure is based on network systems which can support multiple operating modes, allow for optimization of network paths through tunability, provide for scalability and support intelligence through real-time link monitoring. These capabilities contribute to a network that can adapt and scale according to demand.

High-speed global communications networks are based on the manipulation of photons (light), but over the last ten years semiconductor electronics has been the foundation for significant advances in the delivery of lower cost per bit and greater flexibility. Semiconductor integrated circuits (IC) have continued to increase in complexity, with each new generation of manufacturing process technology offering greater functionality, smaller area and lower power.

Fabricated primarily in silicon, IC processing technology – also referred to as CMOS – is based on large-scale integration of transistor gates as a primary building block. Each process node is notionally identified by a gate size expressed in micrometers or nanometers, although the names are typically no longer related directly. Volume manufacturing for the majority of semiconductor products is currently in “7nm” (or equivalent) from various CMOS foundries. Today’s Application Specific-ICs (ASICs) can integrate several hundred million transistors in a chip area of only few hundred mm2. more>

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Updates from ITU

Transforming the driver experience: The connected technology under the hood of intelligent cars
By Amit Sachdeva – There was a time when any talk of a new car among enthusiasts or potential buyers revolved around engine power, fuel efficiency and the sleek design and finish.

Today, that same conversation has expanded to include sustainability and a connected experience.

Consumers expect every aspect of their life to be connected to the internet, so why should one’s car be any different? Automakers are aware of this and are responding by partnering with technology and B2B companies to find innovative ways to satisfy the demands of customers, and avoid being disrupted.

As a result, newer models with embedded Internet of Things (IoT) connectivity and intelligent applications built-in are redefining the manufacturing landscape and the driving experience for consumers.

The surge in the global connected cars market not only impacts the auto industry, it also offers several opportunities for businesses – retailers, insurers, entertainment businesses and of course, the car makers themselves – to leverage the huge volumes of data generated and captured by connected cars to achieve new levels of customer loyalty and open up new revenue streams. more>

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Updates from Ciena

The closed and proprietary mobile networks of the past aren’t welcome any longer. Find out how Ciena is helping customers benefit from a more open, automated, and adaptable 5G wireline network.
By Joe Marsella – After years of hype, I think it’s fair to say that 5G is here. Initial deployments are underway around the world. There’s genuine excitement for a new generation of applications that exploit the massive end-to-end performance gains that 5G will provide across the mobile network. From AR/VR to IoT to gaming to streaming, our industry will push 5G technology to its limits to give consumers and businesses rich and rewarding digital experiences.

But here’s the problem. I’ve traveled the world and spoken to network operators of every size, mobile and wholesale operators alike. They all say the same thing. If the full promise of 5G is to be commercially realized, this time it must be different. We’ll need to challenge the traditional, closed way of building end-to-end mobile networks.

The world is changing. Digital disruption, virtualization, and openness are all driving a change in how networks are built. Look, we don’t shop the way we used to 30 years ago. We order transportation services with the push of a button, and many kids don’t know what it feels like to wait until 8:00 pm for their favorite show to be on (or even worse, wait through commercials!) – because of digital disruption.

It’s time for that change to come to wireless networks. For the past 30 years, successive generations of wireless networks were built a certain way: closed. Mobile Network Operators (MNOs) and wholesale operators alike had to rely on very few vendors and their proprietary architectures, interfaces, and protocols. What if your locked-in vendor wasn’t innovating at the pace you needed to successfully compete? Well – you were stuck until the next generation network was upon us and hoped this time for open, standards-based solutions. more>

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Updates from McKinsey

Skill shift: Automation and the future of the workforce
Demand for technological, social and emotional, and higher cognitive skills will rise by 2030. How will workers and organizations adapt?
By Jacques Bughin, Eric Hazan, Susan Lund, Peter Dahlström, Anna Wiesinger, and Amresh Subramaniam – Skill shifts have accompanied the introduction of new technologies in the workplace since at least the Industrial Revolution, but adoption of automation and artificial intelligence (AI) will mark an acceleration over the shifts of even the recent past. The need for some skills, such as technological as well as social and emotional skills, will rise, even as the demand for others, including physical and manual skills, will fall. These changes will require workers everywhere to deepen their existing skill sets or acquire new ones. Companies, too, will need to rethink how work is organized within their organizations.

his briefing, part of our ongoing research on the impact of technology on the economy, business, and society, quantifies time spent on 25 core workplace skills today and in the future for five European countries—France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and the United Kingdom—and the United States and examines the implications of those shifts.

  1. How will demand for workforce skills change with automation?
  2. Shifting skill requirements in five sectors
  3. How will organizations adapt?
  4. Building the workforce of the future

Over the next ten to 15 years, the adoption of automation and AI technologies will transform the workplace as people increasingly interact with ever-smarter machines. These technologies, and that human-machine interaction, will bring numerous benefits in the form of higher productivity, GDP growth, improved corporate performance, and new prosperity, but they will also change the skills required of human workers.

To measure skill shifts from automation and AI, we modeled skill shifts going forward to 2030—and found that they accelerated. While the demand for technological skills has been growing since 2002, it will gather pace in the 2016 to 2030 period. The increase in the need for social and emotional skills will similarly accelerate. By contrast, the need for both basic cognitive skills and physical and manual skills will decline. more>

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Updates from Ciena

The future is near. Is your business network ready to adapt?
New technologies are changing the way we do business, so enterprises cannot be limited by network performance. Learn why your IP network should adapt to support your business’ needs, and not the other way around.
By Vinicius Santos – Legacy business models are disappearing fast, making us almost forget about how things were implemented just a few years ago. The video streaming business is less than ten years old and physically traveling to a store to rent a hard copy of a movie seems like ancient history. Most of us can barely remember when we had to save essential files on in-house data centers servers instead of somewhere in the cloud. Even sharing data using thumb drives is becoming rather “unusual.”

Well-established businesses are facing waves of digital transformation and are trying to align with customers’ expectations while fighting to maintain their current market share from disruptive innovators. At the same time, these disruptive innovators are becoming much faster when moving from niche markets to mainstream and highly lucrative markets, using technology, speed, and agility as their main tools to better serve their targeted markets.

It’s a process where every new technology is a piece of the transformational engine, creating new business models and opportunities that consequently create additional technologies. The wheel of innovation is not just spinning fast, it’s accelerating!

At the forefront of this transformation are technologies such as cloud computing, analytics, edge compute, machine learning, big data, automation, and the Internet of Things (IoT). All of these technology building blocks have a single enabling factor that tends to be neglected in most conversations: connectivity. more>

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Updates from ITU

How Mexico seeks to connect its rural citizens better: Arturo Robles
ITU News – In Mexico, 95.23 per cent of the population have a mobile-cellular subscription and 65.77 per cent of the population use the internet, according to ITU statistics.

Connecting the remaining population to the power of the internet, however, has been a challenge as many of the people who remain offline live in very isolated rural areas.

But thanks to successful connections with K-band satellites, commercial satellite operators are now finding profitable and feasible opportunities to provide connectivity in these remote villages, says Arturo Robles, Commissioner of Mexico’s Federal Institute of Telecommunications (IFT).

During an interview with ITU at the World Radiocommunication Conference 2019 (WRC-19) in Sharm El-Sheikh, Egypt, Mr. Robles also shared his hope that innovative services could help provide affordable rural connectivity solutions. more>

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Collaborators in creation

Our world is a system, in which physical and social technologies co-evolve. How can we shape a process we don’t control?
By Doyne Farmer, Fotini Markopoulou, Eric Beinhocker and Steen Rasmussen – This is a disorienting time. Disagreements are deep, factions stubborn, the common reality crumbling. Technology is changing who we are and the society we live in at a blinding pace. How can we make sense out of these changes? How can we forge new tools to guide our future? What is our new identity in this changing world?

Social upheavals caused by new technologies have occurred throughout history.

Cultural institutions are also a kind of technology – a social technology. Just as physical technologies – agriculture, the wheel or computers – are tools for transforming matter, energy or information in pursuit of our goals, social technologies are tools for organizing people in pursuit of our goals. Laws, moral values and money are social technologies, as are ways of organizing an army, a religion, a government or a retail business.

While we are fascinated and sometimes frightened by the pace of evolution of physical technologies, we experience the evolution of social technologies differently. Our values, laws and political organizations define and shape our identities. We often regard those who use different social technologies – people from different cultures, regions, nations, religions or those with different values and beliefs – as ‘others’.

When social technologies change too quickly, we experience a loss of identity, a collective confusion about who we are and how we distinguish ourselves from others. But when social technologies change too slowly, this can create tensions too – for example, when political institutions fail to keep pace with wider changes in society.

Physical and social technologies co-evolve all the time, pushing and pulling on each other. The influence is in both directions. Physical and social technologies are so entangled that it can be hard to separate them.

What drives technological change? In many popular narratives, invention is an act performed by heroes such as Thomas Edison and Tim Berners-Lee. In reality, technological change comes about through an incremental process that involves a great deal of trial and error, and networks of people working in ecosystems of innovation. Technological change is an evolutionary process, very much like biological change is an evolutionary process. more>

Updates from Ciena

Uncovering the path to 5G connectivity
The race to deliver new, high-value 5G services is all about how quickly you can evolve your existing 4G infrastructure into a scalable, ultra-reliable, high-performance 5G network. This is the first post in a three-part series from Dave Parsons, Ethernet & IP Solutions and Enablement Director for EMEA at Ciena, where he covers key strategies to accelerate and de-risk the path towards 5G, deliver new services, and stay ahead of your competitors.
By Dave Parsons – We’ve all heard it. In the 5G era, the number of mobile devices are expected to significantly increase and support as high as 100x faster data rates, and 10x lower latency, when compared to today’s 4G LTE. This combination of capacity and latency improvements will unleash a lucrative new range of augmented/virtual reality, IoT, gaming, trading, and industrial applications (such as manufacturing applications and control and monitoring applications for utilities companies).

The race has already begun to migrate existing 4G networks to 5G-capable networks, initially based on the 5G Non-Standalone (NSA) infrastructure, where 5G New Radio (NR) will leverage existing 4G Evolved Packet Core (EPC) infrastructure until the 5G Core network is fully standardized and rolled out.

To keep pace with your competitors, and embrace emerging 5G services, you need to accelerate and de-risk your planned network evolution and bring profitable new services to market as fast as possible. The question is, how?

There are various strategies you can adopt for a successful 4G to 5G network migration. In this series, we’ll explore the paths you can choose from.

  1. Unlock bandwidth-on-demand with scalable cell-site infrastructure: Networks that backhaul 5G traffic must scale by an order of magnitude – typically from 1G to 10G – and even higher in some cases. Backhaul networks are expected to carry existing 4G traffic as well for improved economies of scale via a simpler, converged transport network where high capacity backhaul links can benefit from the very latest in coherent pluggable optics.
  2. Accelerate your 5G infrastructure rollout with Zero-Touch Provisioning (ZTP): Slow, manual, and error-prone installation and configuration of network infrastructure can significantly delay an operator’s 4G to 5G evolution, and increase costs. Solutions offering ZTP overcome these challenges by automating network equipment deployments in a rapid, reliable, and error-free manner, providing a faster 5G service rollouts for significant competitive advantage as the race to 5G intensifies.

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