Tag Archives: Change management

Updates from McKinsey

Managing and supporting employees through cultural change in mergers
By Becky Kaetzler, Kameron Kordestani, Emily O’Loughlin, and Mieke Van Oostende – Mergers create vast organizational anxiety about the future: in most cases, the operating model and culture will change dramatically for one or both merging companies. These changes go far beyond a new name and senior leadership; they challenge the core of an organization’s identity, purpose, and day-to-day work. Even small tactical changes, like new expense policies or cafeteria options, can rattle employees. Anticipating and addressing these “organizational emotions” can set the foundation for seamless, effective integration. Failing to anticipate and address them can lead to poor business performance, a loss of critical talent, and the leakage of synergies.

Merging companies must shift the day-to-day behavior and mind-sets of their employees to protect a deal’s sources of value, both financial and organizational, and to make changes sustainable.

One basic problem is management’s tendency to focus mostly on changes that would directly help to capture a deal’s value targets while largely ignoring those required to maintain and enhance the company’s health. Organizational design, for example, is always top of mind in the early stages of merger planning, but companies often sidestep cultural differences until difficult issues come to light. At that point, the base business will already have suffered, top talent may already have looked for external opportunities, and the capture of synergies may have become more difficult.

A holistic, effective integration program should proactively address the full scope of changes your employees will experience in an integration. Managing through this kind of effort involves two broad tasks: embedding cultural changes and managing operational ones. more>

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Updates from Chicago Booth

Why we should teach people how to lie
By Chana R. Schoenberger – Could you handle being honest—totally, brutally truthful, without even a well-intentioned falsehood to smooth over a social situation—for three days?

Most people don’t think they could, at least not without ruining their family, social, and work lives. Fibs, white lies, and half-truths (along with, perhaps, more egregious whoppers) are such an important part of our interpersonal tool kit that going without them seems next to impossible.

But Chicago Booth’s Emma Levine, along with Carnegie Mellon’s Taya R. Cohen, asked exactly that of a group of research subjects and came away with a surprising conclusion: it’s not as bad as it sounds.

The researchers asked some participants to be completely honest in every interaction, with every person in their lives, for three days, while other participants were asked simply to be kind or conscious of their words. The participants predicted that being forced into honesty would make them unhappier than if they had to be kind or just aware of what they were saying to others. They anticipated frayed relationships as a result of abandoning the lies they typically use to cover up awkward or uncomfortable situations.

But being honest didn’t torpedo subjects’ friendships, family connections, or jobs.

“The experience of being honest is far more pleasurable, leads to greater levels of social connection, and does less relational harm than individuals expect,” Levine and Cohen write. more>

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updates from GE

How I Remade GE
By Jeffrey R. Immelt – I led a team of 300,000 people for 6,000 days. I led through recessions, bubbles, and geopolitical risk. I saw at least three “black swan” events. New competitors emerged, business models changed, and we ushered in an entirely new way to invest. But we didn’t just persevere; we transformed the company. GE is well positioned to win in the future.

The changes that took in the world from 2001, when I assumed the company’s leadership, to 2017 are too numerous to mention. The task of the CEO has never been as difficult as it is today. In that vein, my story is one of progress versus perfection. The outcomes of my decisions will play out over decades, but we never feared taking big steps to create long-term value.

For the past 16 years GE has been undergoing the most consequential makeover in its history. We were a classic conglomerate. Now people are calling us a 125-year-old start-up—we’re a digital industrial company that’s defining the future of the internet of things. Change is in our DNA: We compete in today’s world to solve tomorrow’s challenges. We have endured because we have the determination to shape our own future. Although we’re still on the journey, we’ve made great strides in revamping our strategy, portfolio, global footprint, workforce, and culture. more> https://goo.gl/L9nX1b

3 Must-Do’s for Leading Through Change

By Scott Eblin – Keeping everyone engaged and productive during a big change is a very tough job for leaders at all levels.

The must-do’s fall in three big categories–yourself, your team and your peers:

  • If you’re a designated leader, there’s going to be a lot of people looking to you for direction and watching you for clues about what’s really going on
  • Engage. To be more specific, be visible. Talk with people
  • Stay connected with your peers. Problem solve together. Kibitz and vent

more> http://tinyurl.com/ptzfs2t

Why You Should Build Change Into The Fabric Of Your Business


By Mark Lukens – Creating that culture can be hard, but it’s worth it for the results.

From endlessly examining the systems in place for waste to engaging everyone in a cycle of diagnosis and improvement, Toyota built change into the very fabric of its business so that a change culture naturally arose from it.

The power of the Toyota approach was that it was not reliant on one single person. more> http://tinyurl.com/l4cyk26