Tag Archives: Digital Twin

The New Era of Sustainable Supply Chains

By Mary Page Bailey – To improve sustainability, materials manufacturers are welcoming new digital technologies and process innovations into their global supply chains

From palm oil to plastics, the global supply chains of many critical raw materials are evolving as consumers and manufacturers increasingly seek sustainable and renewable options. Digital technologies, including blockchain, Internet of Things (IoT) sensors and modeling tools, are facilitating these supply-chain transitions by enabling unprecedented data visibility and analyses. At the same time, chemical manufacturers are turning toward process and chemistry innovations to improve the sustainability of their raw materials.

Blockchain, in particular, provides many specific capabilities that are helping manufacturers realize more sustainable sourcing practices. In the plastics sector, for instance, DOMO Chemicals (Ghent-Zwijnaarde, Belgium; www.domochemicals.com) and Covestro AG (Leverkusen, Germany; www.covestro.com), along with the Circularise initiative (www.circularise.com/plastics), are partnering to implement blockchain technology to improve traceability and transparency in plastics manufacturing.

“Blockchain can be applied to many challenges in the plastics value chain, such as complex record keeping and tracking of products. Blockchain serves as a less corruptible and better automated alternative to centralized databases,” says Jordi de Vos, founder of Circularise. Blockchain provides encoded information storage on a network-to-network chain, which validates data to protect business dealings and prevents the theft or manipulation of documents – a unique combination of transparency and security.

The Circularise platform creates a digital twin of a material, component or product to build end-to-end traceability by integrating audit reports, certifications, material parameters and more. In addition to making materials traceable, Circularise aims to protect stakeholders’ privacy – the protocol is specifically developed to enable the disclosure of relevant supply-chain information without having to share sensitive data. more>

The Steps in Creating a Digital Twin

By Don Wilcher – Artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) are making major impacts in the healthcare, advanced manufacturing, agriculture, and consumer electronics vertical markets. The ability to predict behaviors and trends or classify objects based on physical traits is accomplished through AI and ML technologies. With the aid of an Internet of Things (IoT) infrastructure, a digital twin can be created.

Developing a digital twin requires the meshing of physical properties with an information communication technology (ICT) framework and software for data visualization. This data visualization represents real world events and characteristics of physical objects and processes.

In an industrial control process, the ability to monitor physical stimuli, such as temperature, pressure, vibration, and force, is important to the product manufacturer. Such physical stimuli affect the feel, function, and look of the manufactured product. To ensure the quality of the product meets the requirements of the customer, a specification is developed.

The traditional method of using specifications was based on building a physical prototype for testing and data collection. Continuous building of the target physical prototype to adjust the function of the product is costly and time consuming.

However, the digital twin can address functional concerns through a visual representation of the physical prototype. A digital twin is a virtual replica of the physical prototype. more>

Updates from GE

‘Digital Twin’ Technology Changed Formula 1 and Online Ads. Planes, Trains and Power Are Next
By Mark Egan – Winning a Formula 1 race is no longer just about building the fastest car, hiring the bravest driver and praying for luck.

These days, when a McLaren team races in Monaco or Singapore, it beams data from hundreds of sensors wired in the car to Woking, England. There, analysts study that data and use complex computer models to relay optimal race strategies back to the driver.

What’s the connection between racers and online shoppers? To GE Vice President of Software Research Colin Parris, it is clear. The McLaren race crew and the online retailers both harness data and use algorithms to make reasonable projections about the future, Parris explains. The concept is called digital twin.

“The opportunities of the digital twin are huge,” he says. more> http://tinyurl.com/nusklc3