Tag Archives: Extra-vehicular activity

NASA technology (80)

Astronauts Complete First in Series of Spacewalks
NASA – On Sunday, Dec. 22, NASA astronaut Mike Hopkins tweeted this photo of Saturday’s spacewalk, saying, “Wow… can’t believe that is me yesterday. Wish I could find the words to describe the experience, truly amazing.”

Expedition 38 Flight Engineers Rick Mastracchio and Mike Hopkins wrapped up a 5-hour, 28-minute spacewalk outside the International Space Station at 12:29 p.m. EST Saturday, completing the first in a series of excursions aimed at replacing a degraded ammonia pump module associated with one of the station’s two external cooling loops that keeps both internal and external equipment cool. A second spacewalk to install a replacement pump module is scheduled for Tuesday, Dec. 24 at 7:10 a.m. EST, with NASA TV coverage beginning at 6:15 a.m. EST.

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> @AstroIllini (Mike Hopkins) on Twitter

> @AstroRM (Rick Mastracchio) on Twitter

Views from the Solar System (147)

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Astronaut Chris Cassidy Takes a Photo

NASANASA astronaut Chris Cassidy, Expedition 36 flight engineer, uses a digital still camera during a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as work continues on the International Space Station. A little more than one hour into the spacewalk on July 16, 2013, European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano (out of frame) reported water floating behind his head inside his helmet. The water was not an immediate health hazard for Parmitano, but Mission Control decided to end the spacewalk early.

Views from the Solar System (66)

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Sunita Williams on Spacewalk
NASA – NASA astronaut Sunita Williams, Expedition 32 flight engineer, appears to touch the bright sun during the mission’s third session of extravehicular activity (EVA) on Sept. 5, 2012.

During the six-hour, 28-minute spacewalk, Williams and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Aki Hoshide (visible in the reflections of Williams’ helmet visor), flight engineer, completed the installation of a Main Bus Switching Unit (MBSU) that was hampered by a possible misalignment and damaged threads where a bolt must be placed. They also installed a camera on the International Space Station‘s robotic arm, Canadarm2.

Views from the Solar System (9)

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SPACE WATCH

NASA and Navy Veteran John Young
NASA – NASA salutes our country’s veterans this Veteran’s Day 2011.

In today’s image, John Young, astronaut and Navy veteran, salutes the U.S. flag at the Descartes landing site during the first Apollo 16 extravehicular activity (EVA-1). Young, commander of the Apollo 16 lunar landing mission, jumps up from the lunar surface as astronaut and Air Force veteran, Charles M. Duke Jr., lunar module pilot, took this picture.

The Lunar Module (LM) “Orion” is on the left. The Lunar Roving Vehicle is parked beside the LM. The object behind Young in the shade of the LM is the Far Ultraviolet Camera/Spectrograph. Stone Mountain dominates the background in this lunar scene. Image Credit: NASA, Charles M. Duke Jr.