Tag Archives: Internet

Updates from McKinsey

We’re not going back to the ‘normal’ we had before coronavirus
Our global managing partner Kevin Sneader joined Andrew Ross Sorkin on CNBC’s “Squawk Box” Wednesday, March 25, to talk live about the business implications of the coronavirus pandemic. The full interview is available now at CNBC.com. You can read all of our material on the crisis at our coronavirus insights page.
By Kevin Sneader – One thing is clear from all the conversations I’ve had: nothing is going to be the same. This is a new normal, a different way of operating.

I think for our clients, they’re worried about their employees, their customers, and cash—in that order. And they are worried about cash. Even in the health care sector, there are providers who are not getting paid right now, and they’re worried about cash flow just as players in several other sectors are.

Another reality they’re all dealing with is that people keep sending them scenarios as to how this could play out. The message we’re hearing is that the scenarios are helpful, but leaders are wondering what’s going to be true across all these scenarios. Because if it’s not going back to the way it was before, what’s the next normal? What’s the way in which we’re going to have to operate?

The reality is that consumer behavior is changing fundamentally, and so much else is changing, and the question is, “will it go back?” I think the answer in many cases is “no.”

If you think about a lot of what’s happened in the last few years, some of it’s going to be reinforced. The shift [to working] online has now been given a boost, and it’s hard to see that being taken back to where it was before.

At the same time, I think one of the biggest shifts will be the way that products reach us. For many years, we and others have been focused on efficiency: how efficiently can I run my supply chain? I think now there’s going to be a lot of conversation about, how resilient is my supply chain? more>

Related>

Updates from ITU

How can we ensure safety and public trust​ in AI for automated and assisted driving?
ITU News – Cars are becoming increasingly automated. Drivers already benefit from a wide range of advanced driver-assistance systems (ADAS), such as lane keeping, adaptive cruise control, collision warning, and blind spot warning, which are gradually becoming standard features on most vehicles.

Today’s automated systems are taking over an increasing amount of responsibility for the driving task. It is expected that soon, sensors will take the place of human impulse, and artificial intelligence (AI) will substitute for human intelligence.

This process is defined through various level steps, from low levels of automation where the driver retains overall control of the vehicle in level 1, to a fully-autonomous system in level 5.

10 years ago, manufacturers predicted many cars on today’s roads would be fully automated, but it still remains a distant future for the automotive industry. At the recent Future Networked Car Symposium 2020 at ITU Headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland, top experts joined a panel entitled ‘AI for autonomous and assisted driving – how to ensure safety and public trust’ to discuss the progress and the prospects for vehicles that drive themselves – and how we might achieve this future. more>

Related>

Updates from Ciena

Single-wave 400G across 4,000km? Yes – with Ciena’s new Waveserver 5.
Ciena’s popular family of Waveserver products just got a new member – Waveserver 5. With tunable capacity up to 800G and support for 400GbE services at any distance, learn how Waveserver 5 is already setting new industry benchmarks – in live networks.

By Kent Jordan – Two mega-trends have been driving rapid innovation in optical networks. Advanced coherent technology brings the promise of greater network capacity, now reaching up to 800G across short links and 400G at distance. At the same time, new compact modular platforms promise greater density, reduced footprint and lower energy consumption.

What if you could combine this incredible performance and awesome density into one device? Sounds too good to be true, right?

Well not anymore. Ciena’s most advanced coherent technology, WaveLogicTM 5 Extreme, has arrived in the newest member of our Waveserver family of interconnect platforms: Waveserver 5. And, it’s bringing the performance you need, packaged in a compact and efficient footprint.

Combining the world’s most innovative coherent chipset with the simple, server-like operational model the Waveserver family is known for, Waveserver 5 provides network operators with industry-leading transport economics for high-capacity, high-growth applications.

Internet2 will be one of Ciena’s first customers to deploy Waveserver 5. They are building out their next-generation research and education (R&E) network across the U.S. and they have selected Ciena’s best, most flexible, open and highest-performance technologies to do the job. more>

Related>

Updates from Ciena

Building the Adaptive Network – starting with silicon
The journey to the Adaptive Network for network operators is not a linear path and involves managing the deployment of a range of new technologies. Key to this journey is the deployment of a programmable infrastructure. Patricia Bower explores coherent DSP design – one of the primary tools network equipment designers have in order to enable programmability and flexibility – and its significance for network transformations.
By Patricia Bower – New bandwidth-intensive content and applications, along with a massive proliferation of connected devices, will place heavy demands on communications networks going forward. To prepare for this, providers must transform their networks though the implementation of new hardware and software solutions. The Adaptive NetworkTM is the ultimate goal and consists of three main elements – a programmable packet and optical infrastructure to connect network elements; an analytics and intelligence layer to analyze and predict network behavior; and software control and automation to simplify end-to-end management across multi-vendor, multi-domain networks.

A programmable infrastructure is based on network systems which can support multiple operating modes, allow for optimization of network paths through tunability, provide for scalability and support intelligence through real-time link monitoring. These capabilities contribute to a network that can adapt and scale according to demand.

High-speed global communications networks are based on the manipulation of photons (light), but over the last ten years semiconductor electronics has been the foundation for significant advances in the delivery of lower cost per bit and greater flexibility. Semiconductor integrated circuits (IC) have continued to increase in complexity, with each new generation of manufacturing process technology offering greater functionality, smaller area and lower power.

Fabricated primarily in silicon, IC processing technology – also referred to as CMOS – is based on large-scale integration of transistor gates as a primary building block. Each process node is notionally identified by a gate size expressed in micrometers or nanometers, although the names are typically no longer related directly. Volume manufacturing for the majority of semiconductor products is currently in “7nm” (or equivalent) from various CMOS foundries. Today’s Application Specific-ICs (ASICs) can integrate several hundred million transistors in a chip area of only few hundred mm2. more>

Related>

Updates from Siemens

Digitalization takes off in aerospace
By Indrakanti Chakravarthy – When you think about it, the basic mechanics behind aviation has remained the same throughout the decades.

Whether you’re talking about the B-52 Bomber from the mid-1950s. …The Concord SST that whisked folks across the Atlantic. …Or even the much-loved NASA Space Shuttle program. So many wonderful examples of how humans have taken flight over the years.

And here’s the thing – generations of engineers for the past 50 years or so have designed and built aircraft using pretty much the same methods and disciplines.

But all that’s about to change…

Today, with digitalization and the use of the digital twin for aircraft design, development and manufacturing – we are seeing a major shift on how modern aircraft are being designed and built. For the first time ever, the future of flight is boundless. There is no horizon on what we can or cannot do.

Take a look at our latest video below and you’ll see how Siemens is at the forefront of this new digital age. You’ll see how seamless integration of the latest tools and software up and down the value chain are freeing engineers to innovate with less risk. Whether you’re talking automation, simulation, integration of design and analysis tools, additive manufacturing or even artificial intelligence – Siemens has built a global reputation as the Aerospace and Defense partner you can trust. more>

Related>

Updates from ITU

Transforming the driver experience: The connected technology under the hood of intelligent cars
By Amit Sachdeva – There was a time when any talk of a new car among enthusiasts or potential buyers revolved around engine power, fuel efficiency and the sleek design and finish.

Today, that same conversation has expanded to include sustainability and a connected experience.

Consumers expect every aspect of their life to be connected to the internet, so why should one’s car be any different? Automakers are aware of this and are responding by partnering with technology and B2B companies to find innovative ways to satisfy the demands of customers, and avoid being disrupted.

As a result, newer models with embedded Internet of Things (IoT) connectivity and intelligent applications built-in are redefining the manufacturing landscape and the driving experience for consumers.

The surge in the global connected cars market not only impacts the auto industry, it also offers several opportunities for businesses – retailers, insurers, entertainment businesses and of course, the car makers themselves – to leverage the huge volumes of data generated and captured by connected cars to achieve new levels of customer loyalty and open up new revenue streams. more>

Related>

Updates from Ciena

The closed and proprietary mobile networks of the past aren’t welcome any longer. Find out how Ciena is helping customers benefit from a more open, automated, and adaptable 5G wireline network.
By Joe Marsella – After years of hype, I think it’s fair to say that 5G is here. Initial deployments are underway around the world. There’s genuine excitement for a new generation of applications that exploit the massive end-to-end performance gains that 5G will provide across the mobile network. From AR/VR to IoT to gaming to streaming, our industry will push 5G technology to its limits to give consumers and businesses rich and rewarding digital experiences.

But here’s the problem. I’ve traveled the world and spoken to network operators of every size, mobile and wholesale operators alike. They all say the same thing. If the full promise of 5G is to be commercially realized, this time it must be different. We’ll need to challenge the traditional, closed way of building end-to-end mobile networks.

The world is changing. Digital disruption, virtualization, and openness are all driving a change in how networks are built. Look, we don’t shop the way we used to 30 years ago. We order transportation services with the push of a button, and many kids don’t know what it feels like to wait until 8:00 pm for their favorite show to be on (or even worse, wait through commercials!) – because of digital disruption.

It’s time for that change to come to wireless networks. For the past 30 years, successive generations of wireless networks were built a certain way: closed. Mobile Network Operators (MNOs) and wholesale operators alike had to rely on very few vendors and their proprietary architectures, interfaces, and protocols. What if your locked-in vendor wasn’t innovating at the pace you needed to successfully compete? Well – you were stuck until the next generation network was upon us and hoped this time for open, standards-based solutions. more>

Related>

3 Reasons Embedded Security Is Being Ignored

By Jacob Beningo – The IoT has grown to the point that everyone and their brother is in the process of connecting their products to the Internet. This is great because it opens new revenue generating opportunities for businesses and in some cases completely new business models that can generate rapid growth. The problem that I am seeing though is that in several cases there seems to be little to no interest in securing these devices.

(I draw this conclusion from the fact that embedded conferences, webinars, articles and even social media conversations seem to draw far less interest then nearly any other topic).

I’m going to explore the primary reasons why I believe development teams are neglecting security in their embedded products and explain why security doesn’t have to be a necessary evil.

Reason #1 – The Perception That Adding Security Is Expensive

I believe that there is still a perception in the embedded space that security is expensive. Right now, if you were to survey the availability of security experts, you will find that there is a severe shortage at the moment.

Reason #2 – We Will “Add It Later”

Nobody wants to be on the front page due to a security breach. I believe in many cases, companies want to include security, but in the early stages of product development, when funds are short, security is often the lowest priority. With many good intentions, the teams often think they’ll add it later after we get through this sprint or this development cycle. The problem that is encountered here is that you can’t add security on at the end of the development cycle.

Reason #3 – Teams Are In Too Big A Hurry

Nearly every development team that I encounter is behind schedule and in a hurry. New start-ups, seasoned successful teams, there is always way too much to do and never enough time (or budget). In many cases, teams may be developing a new product and need to get to market fast in order to start generating revenue so that they can pay the bills.

Security is a foundational element to any connected device. Security cannot be added on at the end of a product and must be carefully thought through from the very beginning. Without thinking about it up front, the development team can’t ensure they have the right hardware components in place to properly isolate their software components or expect to have the right software frameworks in their application to properly manage and secure their product. more>

Updates from Adobe

On the Edge of Failure
By Alejandro Chavetta – I’m in Hollywood to meet photographer Joe Pugliese. I walk past star-studded sidewalks and restaurants you’ve seen a million times on movies and TV, but there are no celebrity sightings, just regular Angelenos going about their business. It’s a fitting match for Joe’s photographs, which bridge the gap between stars and civilians by normalizing the celebrity and elevating the rest of us to a hero expression of ourselves.

Today, Joe is known for celebrity portraits of Jennifer Lopez, President Obama, Jamie Lee Curtis, and many others that appear in such publications as Wired, Variety, and Texas Monthly, but what most folks don’t know is that Joe got his start putting out a BMX zine using his mom’s Xerox machine, a starting point rooted in graphic design that continues to inform his practice even now.

In high school, I made a Xerox zine of me and my BMX friends. I was having a lot of fun with the graphic design and realized that I needed to take some photos for it, so I picked up a yard-sale camera.

I was still more interested in graphic design as I started shooting. And it was a little clumsy because I would shoot and then I would take it to the processing lab, wait a day or two, get back a print that would get messed up, or I wanted it to be bigger or smaller. Photography didn’t click for me until I set up a darkroom. My parents let me black out the window in my bedroom, and I had another yard sale find of an enlarger and trays and caustic chemicals. It was the most rudimentary set-up.

I had a book that showed me how to develop in a dark room. The first time I put that print into the developer and nothing happened, I thought, “Total failure. Why did I bother with this?” And as I’m thinking about the failure, the print comes up, the image appears, and it was absolute magic. I wasn’t a failure. I could shoot and be in control of the output from start to finish. more>

Related>

Updates from McKinsey

Nudge, don’t nag
With such a fine line between a nudge and a nag, it’s important to acknowledge and understand the subtle differences between the two.
By Bill Schaninger, Alexander DiLeonardo and Stephanie Smallets – In recent years, nudging has been hailed as the latest trend in HR and a novel, new scientific management approach. And for good reason: using nudges has improved everything from customer retention and employee safety to organizational commitment and innovation.

When nudges are executed with care, they have remarkable results. However, in many cases there is a misconception about what a nudge actually is – organizations often launch initiatives that either miss the mark or are just reminders in disguise. When that happens, the nudge is actually a nag, and it risks losing its impact and becoming downright annoying. What can you do to ensure you’re using nudges and not nags?

If your nudges check the three boxes below, you’re well on your way.

Before we dive into what makes a good nudge, it’s important to note what a nudge is. According to Harvard professor Cass Sunstein and Nobel prize winner Richard Thaler, a nudge guides choice without removing options or changing incentives. It’s like leading a horse to the water and framing its options such that the horse is empowered to and actively chooses to drink it – rather than eat the grass or lay in the sunshine.

It’s also just as important to highlight what a nudge is not. A nudge is not a reminder to do something, nor is it a call to action. Nudges aren’t mandatory and they don’t have consequences. If you’re constantly reminding or commanding the horse to drink, it’s not a nudge. It’s also not a nudge if the horse isn’t brought to the water the next day for forgoing the water the day before.

A good nudge is all about choice. At its core, nudging is all about choice. The reason why nudging is so impactful is that it gives people control over their destiny: They can choose whether or not they proceed with the “desirable” option.

A good nudge is easy to follow. Good nudges are easy to understand and empower people to be well-informed. Providing irrelevant, complex or confusing information is difficult to process and can make people feel like they were hoodwinked into making the choice.

A good nudge is personal. By far, the best nudges are those that use technology and analytics to tailor them to the audience. Nudges that take into account individuals’ mindsets, preferences and behaviors ensure that the most desirable option overall is also the most desirable option for that specific individual – a true win-win. more>

Related>