Tag Archives: ITU

Updates from ITU

How can AI help make our roads safer?
ITU News – What does a fully autonomous, electric, high-performance race car have to do with the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)?

For starters, the vehicle, developed by Roborace, is providing a testing ground for new efforts to build public trust in how next-generation vehicles could improve road safety and reduce the 1.35 million annual road deaths worldwide (SDG 3.6). Increased use of autonomous, electric, connected vehicles could also reduce emissions, improve traffic flows — and provide affordable, safe and sustainable transport systems to underdeveloped nations (SDG 11.2).

But how do we go from race track to the road?

A panel of experts – Bryn Balcombe, CSO at Roborace and Founder of the Autonomous Drivers Alliance; Lucas di Grassi, Formula-E World Champion and CEO at Roborace; and Fred Werner, Head of Strategic Engagement at ITU’s Standardization Bureau – met at Web Summit 2019 to discuss how AI will make our roads safer, and how ITU is helping lead the charge. more>

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Updates from ITU

Why ITU strives to be the world’s most inclusive standardization platform
By Bilel Jamoussi – The global ICT ecosystem is a remarkable feat of engineering and a similarly remarkable feat of international collaboration.

The ICT industry relies on technical standards to an extent rivalled by few other industry sectors.

Our networks and devices interconnect and interoperate thanks to the tireless efforts of thousands of experts worldwide who come together to develop international standards.

International standards provide the technical foundations of the global ICT ecosystem – today’s advanced optical, radio and satellite networks are all based on ITU standards.

95 per cent of international traffic runs over optical infrastructure built in conformance with ITU standards. Video will account for over 80 per cent of all Internet traffic by 2020, and this traffic will rely on ITU’s Primetime Emmy winning video-compression standards.

Standards create efficiencies enjoyed by all market players, efficiencies and economies of scale that ultimately result in lower costs to producers and lower prices to consumers. more>

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Updates from ITU

ITU Green Standards Week adopts Call to Action to accelerate transition to Smart Sustainable Cities
ITU News – ITU Green Standards Week has brought together governments, city leaders, businesses and citizens to share their experiences in driving the behavioral change required to achieve smart city objectives.

These participants have adopted a ‘Call to Action’ urging city stakeholders to accelerate the transition to Smart Sustainable Cities.

These participants have adopted a ‘Call to Action’ urging city stakeholders to accelerate the transition to Smart Sustainable Cities.

The Call to Action highlights that our cities – as powerful hubs of innovation, and a central force behind humanity’s impact on our environment – must make a defining contribution to the achievement of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). more>

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Updates from ITU

The network operator of 2025: can telcos retain a leading role in the digital era?
ITU News – After building much of the infrastructure for the digital transformation we see across industries and society, traditional telecommunications network operators continue to be confronted by extensive changes in markets, technologies, consumer demands and value chains.

“We’re talking about the industry that 20 years ago was the sexiest industry in the world,” said Tomas Lamanauskas, founder and Managing Partner at Envision Associates, Ltd. “We’re at a little bit of a different stage now.”

That could be the understatement of the decade.

With new market players, multi-billion dollar mergers, massive infrastructure investment requirements and shrinking traditional revenue bases, the question arises: Can telecommunications companies (telcos) retain a leading role in the digital era? And what role will regulators have in this increasingly dynamic space?

The answers to these questions have great implications for people worldwide whose lives could be greatly benefited by a range of services from mobile banking and smart farming to intelligent transport systems and customized, precision healthcare solutions. And they have great implications for ITU, which counts telcos as some of its most active, most influential traditional private-sector members. more>

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Updates from ITU

Why radiocommunications are so crucial for natural disaster management
By Mario Maniewicz – As the Director of ITU’s Radiocommunications Bureau, I could not highlight enough the relevance of radiocommunications, and more specifically the relevance of satellite communications in the management and mitigation of eventual crises.

Radiocommunication services have driven substantial transformation in many development-related sectors including environment, health and education – making them a key accelerator towards the achievement of the SDGs.

If we look into the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) No. 13 on Climate Action, its first target is to strengthen resilience and adaptive capacity to climate-related hazards and natural disasters in all countries.

Allow me to illustrate the key role satellite communications play towards achieving this SDG target by providing vital connectivity before, during and after a disaster occurs.

  • In order to be well-prepared for an event, accurate climate prediction and the detection of climate-related hazards are key. And both rely heavily on data obtained from space sensing and earth observation satellite systems.
  • In the unlikely detection of a natural disturbance in the state of the atmosphere, timely awareness and early warning of the population allows them to be better prepared and less impacted by a natural or environmental adversity.
  • Moreover, satellite communications are often used for rescue and relief operations as well as in vital life-saving responses, since they remain as a resilient solution even when terrestrial communications have been severely damaged.
  • Finally, satellite communications continue to provide valuable services until other telecommunication and basic services have been restored.

Taking into account the relevance of connectivity, especially for regions and countries affected by disasters, the ITU is striving to ensure that all the world’s people have access to affordable communications. more>

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Updates from ITU

Here’s how we can build public trust in self-driving vehicles
By Chaesub Lee – The automotive industry is undergoing extraordinary transformation.

The future of transport looks to be electric; highly automated; and – increasingly – shared.

This transformation is ambitious, and this ambition is very welcome.

In mobility, we can impact billions of people’s lives for the better.

We can save countless numbers of lives. We can improve environmental sustainability. And we can expand access to the many opportunities that mobility brings.

New technologies are at the heart of this transformation, and international standardization will be essential to ensure that these technologies are deployed efficiently and at scale.

That is why the ITU membership includes Volkswagen Group and Hyundai – and a diverse range of other automotive industry players such as China’s Telematics Industry Application Alliance, Continental, Bosch, BlackBerry, Tata Communications and Mitsubishi Electric.

By joining the United Nations specialized agency for information and communication technologies, ICTs, they are helping to shape international standards that protect and encourage key investments, improve road safety and help build intelligent transport systems. more>

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Updates from ITU

Prioritize digital skills to drive global development
By Doreen Bogdan-Martin – By 2030 there will be an estimated two billion young people seeking opportunities for a bright future. If we give these young people the right skills, they will each have the chance to reach their full potential – and their personal success can begin to translate into sustained economic success for their local economies.

Education is the tool that empowers us all. Building digital skills and leveraging young people’s natural affinity with technology is a powerful way to help nations around the world grow and strengthen their economic base and become more competitive in today’s globalized markets.

Right now, however, we know that investments in building digital skills are falling far short of needs. Even in the world’s wealthy nations, millions of students still aren’t getting access to technology in the classroom and at home.

In the developing world, access is even more limited. Without digital skills, these young people are being left behind in a world that grows ever more digital by the day.

Empowering populations with digital skills and literacy is also vitally important to connecting the remaining half the world’s population that is still offline. Digital skills generate demand for the Internet, and drive deployment of broadband. And new ITU research confirms that higher broadband penetration translates into a boost for GDP, particularly in developing countries.

In ITU’s new edition of Digital Skills Insights (formerly Capacity Building in a Changing ICT Environment), we bring together the latest information and perspectives in the fast-growing field of digital learning and skills development. more>

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Updates from ITU

Meet your virtual avatar: the future of personalized healthcare
ITU News – Tingly? Sharp? Electric? Dull? Pulsing?

Trying to describe a pain you feel to your doctor can be a difficult task. But soon, you won’t have to: a computer avatar is expected to tell your doctor everything they need to know.

The CompBioMed Centre of Excellence, an international consortium of universities and industries, is developing a program that creates a hyper-personalized avatar or ‘virtual human’ using a supercomputer-generated simulation of an individual’s physical and biomedical information for clinical diagnostics.

There is a rapid and growing need for this kind of technology-enabled healthcare. 12 million people who seek outpatient medical care in the U.S. experience some form of diagnostic error. Additionally, the World Health Organization estimates that there will be a global shortage of 12.9 million healthcare workers by 2035.

Greater access to technology-enabled healthcare will allow doctors to make better and faster diagnoses – and provide the tools to collect the necessary data.

The Virtual Human project combines different kinds of patient data that are routinely generated as part of the current healthcare system, such as x-rays, CAT scans or MRIs to create a personalized virtual avatar. more>

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Updates from ITU

New ITU standard to introduce Machine Learning into 5G networks
ITU News – A new ITU standard has established a basis for the cost-effective integration of Machine Learning into 5G and future networks.

The standard – ITU Y.3172 –  describes an architectural framework for networks to accommodate current as well as future use cases of Machine Learning.

“Machine Learning will change the way we operate and optimize networks,” says Slawomir Stanczak, Chairman of the ITU-T Focus Group on ‘Machine Learning for Future Networks including 5G’.

“Every company in the networking business is investigating the introduction of Machine Learning, with a view to optimizing network operations, increasing energy efficiency and curtailing the costs of operating a network,” says Stanczak. “This ITU Y.3172 architectural framework provides a common point of reference to improve industry’s orientation when it comes to the introduction of Machine Learning into mobile networks.”

Machine Learning holds great promise to enhance network management and orchestration.

Drawing insight from network-generated data, Machine Learning can yield predictions to support the optimization of network operations and maintenance. more>

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Updates from ITU

Dark skies, bright future: overcoming Nigeria’s e-waste epidemic
By Eloise Touni – Nigerian law prohibits burning plastic cables, as well as acid leaching and other common methods used by John and his fellow pickers to reclaim valuable metals from discarded electronics. But minimal enforcement and a low awareness of the risks they are running means most pickers continue to regularly expose themselves to toxins that cause respiratory and dermatological problems, eye infections, neurodevelopmental issues, and, ultimately, shorter lives.

While international agreements like the Basel Convention prohibit the import of hazardous waste, unscrupulous importers and a porous customs system mean Nigeria now ranks alongside Ghana as one of the world’s leading destinations for electronic waste. The country receives 71,000 tonnes of used consumer goods through the two main ports in Lagos from the European Union and other more industrialized economies every year.

“Some of the e-waste from abroad is comprised of cathode-ray TVs, which contain lead, as well as refrigerators and air conditioners containing hydrochlorofluorocarbons, making it a threat to those who are dismantling and dealing with the products,” the UN Environment Program’s Eloise Touni says.

Plastic components, including hard casings and cables, also contain persistent organic pollutants used as flame retardants, such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE).

These were banned by the Stockholm Convention due to their long-lasting global impacts and are regularly detected in ecosystems and people all over the world, including in Arctic wildernesses and their traditional inhabitants. more>

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