Tag Archives: Manufacturing

Optimizing the Digital Transformation Process

By Stuart Carlaw – When looking at optimizing the digital transformation process in industrial and manufacturing verticals, the task is complex, fraught with risk and subject to increasing pressures in abundance. ABI Research has outlined a number of best practices that fall within a two-step process that will help in “de-risking” the transformation process.

Probably the most profound challenges for anyone looking to implement a technology-driven transformation process is clearly understanding where you are currently in terms of solution maturity and what the end vision should be. Once you know where you are, then you can realistically look to where to target for advancement.

The Industry 4.0 Maturity Model by ABI Research has been designed to provide companies with a quick snapshot of their maturity level and should be viewed as a tool to help align corporations objectively about not only where they stand in the spectrum of industrial development but also where their vision should be aligned regarding future projects.

Once an organization has a good perspective of where it sits on the maturity scale, the job of avoiding common mistakes becomes a far easier prospect. The chances of chasing unrealistic technology goals and making poor decisions based on stock price rather than operational viability become far less when leadership is honest and aligned around a clear understanding of state zero represented in today’s modus operandi.

However, any company is not out of the woods until it galvanizes around a few golden rules when it pivots towards making meaningful changes to your future fortunes. >more>

Updates from Siemens

Siemens – In an industry that demands new products at an unprecedented rate, electronics companies are increasingly relying on “smart manufacturing” to address the challenges of complexity, customization, compliance, globalization and customer expectations for near-perfect quality.

Smart manufacturing – employing computer control and high levels of adaptability – takes advantage of powerful information and manufacturing technologies that enable flexibility in physical processes for a dynamic and global market.

The foundation of smart manufacturing is an integrated platform that unites all of the domains required to engineer, manufacture and deliver today’s smart products. Smart manufacturing is a digitalized development strategy that encompasses the entire process, from PCB design and factory floor optimization to incorporating customer feedback in new designs.

This approach can reduce time-to-market by up to 50 percent, shrink development costs by as much as 25 percent and enable electronics companies to deliver near-perfect product quality.

A digitalization strategy is aimed at creating digital twins of products, production, and performance – detailed and accurate replicas that help accelerate the development, manufacturing, delivery, and service of their real-world counterparts. more>

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Updates from Siemens

Motorsports is speeding the way to safer urban mobility
A novel Siemens partnership will apply the advanced automated and connected vehicle technologies to boost safety – first in motorsports and eventually in urban environments. The partnership brings together Siemens, with its broad, chip-to-city transportation technology portfolio, and the Fédération Internationale de l’Automobile (FIA), the world leader in the most advanced forms of motorsports.
By Edward Bernardon – The World Rally Championship is a fast, exciting and spectacular event, but it can also be dangerous, even for spectators. Some people risk their lives for a perfect photo or the perfect view. Spectators often cross barriers or suddenly jump out of scrubs just to take the ultimate photo of a passing Rally car – risking their own life and potentially endangering fellow-spectators, drivers and co-drivers.

Last year more than four million spectators attended Rally events, which take place on stages that can stretch across more than 25 kilometers. This can make it difficult for race organizers to monitor an entire stage, which are often on relatively narrow dirt and gravel roads that cut through diverse terrain, further hampering efforts of marshals or spotters to watch for fans who may be in harm’s way.

Rally organizers want the ability to quickly detect people in these unsafe areas. They need a solution that provides complete situational awareness of spectator location and flow in order to ensure that all spectators can safely enjoy an event. more>

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Updates from Siemens

How Orlando’s Work With Digital Twins May Change How We Engineer Everything
By Michael Keller – This is the home of BRIDG, a public-private partnership established to bring advanced microelectronics research to market through the fabrication of silicon wafers. Printed on these wafers are the microchips that enable everything from smartphones to aircraft guidance systems. The BRIDG facility, the newest of its kind in the country, can produce a mix of single wafers for prototyping and support low-volume production. Each wafer is capable of holding thousands of microchips.

“Whether we’re talking about the automotive industry, healthcare, or aerospace and defense, these chips are integral to microelectronics in our modern world,” said Fran Korosec, BRIDG’s vice president of program management.

Building chips on these wafers is no small feat. A chip could have tens of millions of transistors on every square millimeter. To help with this complex work, BRIDG is among the first in the semiconductor industry to rely on complete digital replicas of physical chip components and the physical manufacturing process used to make them.

It’s an innovation called the digital twin, and both BRIDG and Orlando are at the forefront of bringing this technology to industry. more>

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Updates from Siemens

New technology in industry is creating a platform economy
By Frank_Fang – Twenty years ago, product-centric companies dominated a list of the most valuable companies in the world. The list was a Who’s Who of automotive, manufacturing, oil and gas, and brick-and-mortar retailers.

Today, platform-based businesses rule.

This new economy forces product-centric manufacturing companies to rethink how they transform digitally to survive and thrive in a data-rich market. It’s no secret that new technology and new approaches eventually supersede the old.

We’re witnessing one of these periods now. As manufacturers look for ways to radically redefine processes through the hype of the sharing economy, online platforms, the end of money and all the other buzzwords people use today, digital twin evolution will lead to platform economy, a state Viktor Mayer-Schönberger foresees in his book Reinventing Capitalism in the Age of Big Data.

Digital twins, which evolve from decades of simulation and analysis in engineering, are high fidelity models for actual physical objects such as a product or production process. Using computer aided-design, model-based system engineering and multiphysics simulation tools, a designer or engineer creates a digital representation for a physical object or process.

The digital twin is no longer science fiction. For example, NASA used this approach to design, engineer and produce two Mars rovers: Curiosity and InSight.

Since you can’t build a Mars environment on earth, you simply bring Mars to the computer and digitally test your Mars rover. more>

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Updates from Siemens

Manufacturing Operations Center
Siemens – Siemens Manufacturing Operations Management (MOM) software is a holistic solution that enables you to implement your strategy for the complete digitalization of manufacturing operations. Our portfolio provides end-to-end visibility into production allowing decision makers to readily identify areas to be improved within both the product design and associated manufacturing processes, and make the necessary operational adjustments for smoother and more efficient production.

The technologies and architecture of the our portfolio adapt to the specific requirements of different industrial processes. It provides comprehensive MOM applications with a rich ecosystem of industry-specific functionalities developed from deep expertise in manufacturing. The highly scalable platform delivers multiple capabilities and enables customers to combine production efficiency with quality and visibility to reduce time to production.

Our products provide solutions for:
• Advanced Planning and Scheduling
• Manufacturing Execution
• Quality Management
• Manufacturing Intelligence
• R&D and Quality management for process industries
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Updates from Siemens

Why fulfilling airworthiness requirements means going digital
By Dave Chan and John Cunneen – Any organization that must consistently prove airworthiness requirements can relate to the frustrating tasks of locating and providing proof their products will perform in accordance with standards, rules and laws in a myriad of countries.

No more so is this appropriate than in the aerospace industry where everything is built on safety. Every rule, every design requirement has blood on it. These rules exist because someone was or can be hurt, a plane could crash, or any number of catastrophic incidents can occur.

This is why there are rigorous standards in place to ensure anything that can take off and land, from the smallest glider and helicopter to the largest commercial airliner and military jet, must receive and maintain an airworthiness certificate. The process of aircraft certification can be daunting simply because many organizations don’t take proactive approaches in the development phase through delivery to make it so. more>

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Updates from Siemens

Plant Module Design
Siemens – Deliver greater innovation at higher quality and lower cost with our comprehensive 3D plant module and equipment design solutions for the Energy & Utilities industry. Our 3D CAD solutions provide a fully integrated and intuitive suite of broad and deep, best in class capabilities. They combine a data-centric approach to modular plant design with full configuration management to dramatically improve efficiencies at the fabrication facility.

Global megatrends such as the rise of international competition and prolonged low commodity prices are disrupting the entire Energy & Utilities industry. Leading Equipment OEM’s and EPCs are adopting a more modular approach to plant and module design and fabrication. more>

Updates from Siemens

Product Data Management for Consumer Packaged Goods
Siemens – With today’s packaged consumer goods industry more cost-competitive than ever, manufacturers must increase efficiency wherever possible. A lifecycle approach to process and data management is critical for this.

Our solution centralizes technical information and keeps it up-to-date and accessible. This creates efficiency gains that will improve how you manage change, execute work processes, drive quality, and connect to external suppliers and customers.

The consumer product business has never been more competitive making the need for agility and resilience at the enterprise level essential. That’s hard to achieve when information your company relies on is stored in many uncontrolled locations, and often in incompatible formats.

Whether you produce home or office goods, or make sporting goods and toys products, a lifecycle approach to managing technical information will improve the way your people work. Our lifecycle management solution enables you to consolidate and connect the output of existing systems so that people spend less time looking for what they need. Their ability to execute more efficiently results in faster, better-informed decisions across your entire enterprise. more>

Updates from Siemens

Digital Enterprise Industry Solutions for Automotive Suppliers
Siemens – Mechanical, electrical and software systems of modern cars are often developed by suppliers and bring increasing integration challenges.

For suppliers, greater program complexity also increases the risk of quality issues and penalty costs associated with product failures are huge. Today’s automotive suppliers must deliver innovative technologies and solutions across a global delivery footprint without compromising any of the quality, cost and timing requirements of their customers.

Program success depends on collaboration between automakers and suppliers. Our solutions help suppliers digitalize planning, design, testing and manufacturing by breaking down barriers between engineering functions and providing real-time access to information through an open PLM platform. more>

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