Tag Archives: Manufacturing

Updates from Siemens

Smart Products, Smart Manufacturing
Siemens – Next-generation smart products are complex systems of systems that make current development processes inadequate.

Smart factories with smarter, faster and cheaper robots along with additive manufacturing processes are disrupting factories and transforming the manufacturing industry. This requires a new approach to development – a model-based design and manufacturing approach that creates a digital twin and then connects that detailed digital information with people throughout the organization through a digital thread.

This digital twin allows global teams across all disciplines the detailed information they need to evaluate opportunities and predict performance. more>

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Updates from Siemens

Using NX and Learning Advantage to enable students to develop the professional skills required by industry
Siemens – With 1,700 employees and 15,000 students, Luleå University of Technology in northern Sweden is a thriving center of teaching and research that collaborates with businesses, educational institutions and public bodies across the world.

The Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics is home to a range of engineering courses that encompass materials, mechanics, power and sustainable energy. For engineering students within this department, the study of computer-aided design (CAD) is a basic requirement. However, students from other departments can select CAD as an optional subject. These include electrical engineers and space engineers, plus those studying subjects such as business administration and computer science. According to Peter Jeppsson, senior lecturer at Luleå University, CAD is a very popular choice.

The department has well-equipped workshops with a range of tooling machinery. Jeppsson describes the ethos of the department: “At the university we teach CAD software and engineering theory at the same time, not as separate subjects. We give students the opportunity to solve real-world problems and make better products by considering overall function, performance, production and lifecycle. We use computer-aided design and simulation for every aspect of a product.” more>

Updates from GE

Can You Hear Me Now? New GE Voices Site Gives Employees, Partners A Place To Learn And Speak Up
By Maureen O’Hagan – When William “Mo” Cowan was named GE’s president of global government affairs and policy in August, he came with a unique perspective, forged through experience that few can claim: He had served for a time as a U.S. senator, filling John Kerry’s empty seat when Kerry became secretary of state.

Cowan now has at his disposal a powerful tool to amplify that engagement. The company just relaunched GE Voices, an online hub where employees, suppliers and others connected to GE can learn more about — and speak up about — some of the key policy issues affecting the company today. Subscribers — there are more than 75,000 of them — can access explainers to see how hot policy issues like tax reform and tariffs affect them personally.

Front and center on the site is an interactive map showing the company’s broad presence in the United States. The first thing you’ll notice is that the GE family is everywhere you look, with dots representing GE’s manufacturing and research facilities, suppliers, educational partners and venture companies stretching from Maine to Florida, New York to California, Alaska to Hawaii. There are dots in all 50 states. more>

Updates from Autodesk

PolyTrans|CAD+DCC+Animation Pro 3D Translation System
Okino – Now in its third decade of development, PolyTrans|CAD is used by tens of thousands of production studios and professional 3D users to cross convert crack-free and render-perfect BREP solids CAD models (in native formats, not reverse engineered secondary CAD formats), and all skinning + animation data, between 3ds Max, Maya, LightWave, CINEMA 4D and all major downstream file formats ranging from COLLADA to Wavefront OBJ and dozens more.

It is now commonplace, via the widespread use of PolyTrans|CAD, to use Autodesk 3ds Max and Maya to create product brochures, technical documentation and presentation materials of CAD data. PolyTrans|CAD allows all disparate departments of companies (such as engineering, design, marketing and support), and animation production companies alike, to easily exchange and re-use product data without the need to rebuild their 3D datasets. more>

Could China’s Raw Materials Strategy Leave US Automakers Behind?

By Charles Murray – China’s business relationships are so aggressive, said Jose Lazuen, an electric vehicle and supply chain analyst for Roskill, that it’s almost “too late” for automakers in other regions of the world to catch up now.

“The North American and European companies are not at the same level as the Chinese OEMs,” Lazuen stated. “They’ll face problems if raw material costs increase at some point.”

Chinese suppliers at the show said they view relationships with miners as a necessity, given the volatile and unpredictable nature of the market. “The only way you’re going to (get control) is to have a mindset to get ahead of the game by buying rights to those minerals to keep the prices down,” noted Robert Galyen, chief technology officer of CATL, a China-based company that is now the biggest battery manufacturer in the world.

The question of future metal costs is a growing concern, experts said this week, because lithium, cobalt, and nickel will continue to play key roles in future electric car batteries. One speaker at the show noted that the price of cobalt rose 130% last year, while lithium climbed by 50% and nickel was up 28%.

If those increases continue, raw material costs could negate any economies of scale that might otherwise be gained through increases in production volume. more>

Updates from Siemens

Digital Enterprise Industry Solutions for Automotive OEMs
Siemens – Automotive OEMs are remaking themselves in an era of digital disruptions across the industry. Product complexity, technological change, and increasing competition places pressure on OEMs to innovate faster. Leading automakers are increasingly using systems engineering processes that span the domains of mechanical, electrical and software functions to realize the innovation needed for next-gen cars.

Siemens PLM Software solutions are built on open standards to allow for seamless integration across disciplines. This gives automakers the flexibility to digitalize product development, enabling everyone to access a car’s digital twin. more>

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Updates from Siemens

Swiss furniture maker produces innovative seating and tables following Industry 4.0 concepts
Girsberger – Since Girsberger AG’s development of an infinite height adjustment mechanism for stools patented in 1910, the company has been turning out novel and often groundbreaking seating solutions. Since it was established as a wood turning shop in Zurich, Switzerland, in 1889, the furniture manufacturer has been producing innovative seating and tables with outstanding ergonomics, resilience and durability for offices as well as dining rooms.

To remain internationally competitive with this portfolio in a country such as Switzerland with its high infrastructure and labor costs as well as an adverse exchange rate is in itself quite a challenge.

“Combining sophisticated, original design and functionality with maximum practical benefits, we create tomorrow’s classics,” says Michael Girsberger. He is heading the Switzerland-based group with subsidiaries in the European Union and Turkey in the family’s fourth generation. “This requires an uncompromisingly honest use of materials as well as precision in manufacturing with high craftsmanship.” more>

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Updates from Siemens

Solutions for Semiconductor Equipment Product Lifecycle Management
Siemens – To be successful in the marketplace, semiconductor equipment companies must provide innovative semiconductor process solutions to chip makers at low cost and with leading-edge features, superior quality and reliability. The architectural elements of these process solutions are mechanical functions, electrical controls and software-driven electronics.

To keep up with the increasing complexity of these elements, diverse customer needs, and strong competition amid rapid technological change, semiconductor equipment makers must consistently and successfully invest in product and process research and development (R&D), and maximize the R&D productivity.

To increase R&D productivity and avoid wasteful investments, equipment makers must effectively collaborate with semiconductor ecosystem partners, such as foundries and chip makers. The equipment makers must reduce cost through smart sourcing or outsourcing in a global electronics supply chain. To tackle the product complexities, they must implement a modularized product development strategy based upon a common platform with a well-defined technology roadmap and interfaces. more>

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Updates from Siemens

Product Realization for Aerospace and Defense
Siemens – Aerospace companies need to win business in an environment that is increasingly competitive, both locally and globally. This requires proving your ability to meet target dates and costs in production while delivering products that meet customer requirements. Increasing demand in some sectors, such as commercial aircraft, drives a requirement for higher levels of productivity. You have to take advantage of new materials and processes to build the most competitive products.

The Product Realization solution from Siemens PLM Software provides aerospace OEMs and suppliers a process-driven aerospace manufacturing solution to enable manufacturing decision-making earlier in the lifecycle and integrate manufacturing considerations throughout each phase of the lifecycle.

This closed-loop solution supports early manufacturing planning during the program pursuit and bid process to identify and mitigate risks that could impact overall program affordability. You can verify manufacturing processes, tooling and work instructions virtually, prior to committing hardware. more>

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Where Did Qualcomm Go Wrong?

By Bolaji Ojo – It’s a justifiable question. The Qualcomm–NXP trip was an expensive sortie: Qualcomm has paid $2 billion in mandatory break-off fees to NXP, but the bill for the hidden costs may be much higher. For nearly two years, the communications IC and IP supplier and its target endured prolonged uncertainties. Even now, the spasms from customer disruptions remain strong while many employees, though heaving a sigh of relief, must figure out where they truly belong in the enterprise.

Qualcomm is moving on resolutely from the NXP debacle. It must. However, the implications and lessons — if any — are industry-wide. One of the largest acquisitions in the history of the semiconductor industry foundered because of oppositions from various fronts, including customers who might have benefited from it. Simply dumping the blame on nebulous factors and faceless regulators will result in the industry learning nothing from the experience. Perhaps the transaction was destined to fail. Perhaps it could have been better managed and successfully, too. A thorough assessment of why this deal collapsed would offer lessons that can be applied to future deals.

There are no signs that Qualcomm will conduct a detailed analysis of why and how the bid unraveled. It is easier — again — to simply toss more money at stakeholders and move on. NXP’s management and shareholders who had tendered their equity could slake their thirst with $2 billion in Qualcomm’s money. more>