Tag Archives: Manufacturing

Highly Integrated Led Driver Design for Automotive Displays

By Szukang Hsien – Displays are ubiquitous in modern cars, from instrument clusters to center stack touchscreens, head-up displays, rear-seat entertainment, and more. It is estimated that there are up to 12 displays per vehicle in today’s automobiles. The vast automotive display market is dominated by TFT-LCD technologies while OLEDs may play a significant role in the future. For TFT-LCD panels, a majority is still white LED edge-lit displays, which need precise, constant current sink to drive these LEDs.

The display receives power through multiple rails while the video signal receives power through the gigabit multimedia serial link (GMSL). It converts serial LVDS data to a parallel interface in RGB format. A high-voltage buck converter provides the main 5V or 3.3V rail, which feeds the rest of the low-voltage circuits while the high-voltage LDO provides the always-on power to the MCU. The LED driver is usually directly connected to a car battery, which is needed to support lower battery voltage for start-stop systems as well as cold-crank conditions. more>

The F-35 At 20: How Its Successes, And Failures, Shaped The Aerospace Industry

The takeaway from the last 20 years, according to aerospace analyst Richard Aboulafia, might well be, “You succeeded, but please don’t try that again.”
By Valerie Insinna – On Friday, Oct. 26, 2001, executives and employees from the nation’s two biggest defense primes gathered in boardrooms and sprawling production facilities to watch a Pentagon press conference. At stake: the Joint Strike Fighter competition, which would decide who would dominate the next 40 years of the defense aerospace industry — and rake in hundreds of billions in profits.

It was a moment five years in the making. The Pentagon wanted to buy a single stealth aircraft for the Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps capable of three distinct operational requirements: conventional landings on a runway, landing on aircraft carriers, and performing short takeoffs and vertical landings.

It awarded contracts to Lockheed Martin and Boeing in 1996 to build competing prototypes, known as the X-35 and X-32. By July 2001, Lockheed’s X-35 had proven it could execute a short, 500-foot takeoff, fly at supersonic speeds and then vertically land in a single flight. While Boeing’s X-32 also demonstrated supersonic flight and vertical landings, it did not accomplish them in the same flight.

For the engineers that had designed and developed the two planes, emotions were running high as a group of white-haired defense acquisition officials approached the podium of the Pentagon press briefing room.

And just like that, the competition was over. more>

Car Makers Reap What’s Sown During Chip Shortage

By George Leopold – Despite optimistic predictions that auto makers have seen the worst of ongoing semiconductor shortages, sources closer to the technology supply chain maintain things will get worse before they get any better.

Industry consultant Semiconductor Intelligence downplayed auto industry assertions about the second quarter representing the “trough” of IC supply chain disruptions. Citing a growing list of auto production cutbacks stemming from the chip shortage, the market tracker countered in recent weeks that “the shortage of semiconductors for automotive applications is getting worse.”

It cited production cuts at Ford, GM, Hyundai, Toyota, the merged Fiat-Chrysler-Peugeot group called Stellantis and Volkswagen. more>

Master Bond

militaryaerospace.com – With a product line of over 3,000 formulations, Master Bond has been supplying aerospace and defense manufacturers with custom formulated compounds for structural bonding and a variety of electronic applications. Master Bond’s mission is to develop cutting edge adhesives, sealants, coatings and potting/encapsulation systems utilizing advanced technology for challenging applications.

Our expansive line of epoxies, silicones, UV curable and LED curable systems feature superior performance properties even in extreme conditions including:

  • High/low temperature resistance
  • Electrical conductivity/insulation
  • Thermal conductivity
  • High/low viscosity
  • Flexibility and toughness
  • Chemical resistance
  • Optical clarity

Our products feature superior long-term durability. They are used in a variety of industries and are designed to meet stringent industry standards and are certified for:

  • NASA low outgassing
  • Federal Aviation Regulations 25.853(a) for flame retardancy
  • UL 94V-0 and UL94V-1
  • U.S. MIL-STD 883J (Section 3.5.3) for thermal stability
  • U.S. MIL-STD 810G (Method 508.7) for fungus resistance.
  • Airbus testing for flame retardancy, smoke emission and toxicity
  • Boeing standards for low smoke and toxicity

more>

How to Build a Better Chiplet Packaging to Extend Moore’s Law

Packaging approaches like chiplet tech can extend Moore’s Law. But what does that mean for chip design product developers and fabs?
By John Blyler – Moore’s Law may not be dead, but it certainly has been challenged significantly beyond the 28nm process node. Fortunately, there are ways to extend Moore’s Law’s cost, feature, and size benefits. One way is to use chiplets – or modular dies – that effectively bypass Moore’s Law by replacing single silicon die with multiple smaller dies that work together in a unified packaged solution.

This approach provides much more silicon to add transistors compared to a monolithic microchip. As a result, chiplets are expected to return to the two-year doubling cycle that has been the cornerstone economics of the semiconductor business since 1965.

The global market for processor microchips that utilize chiplets in their manufacturing process is set to expand to $5.8 billion in 2024, rising by a factor of nine from $645 million in 2018, according to Omdia(Image Source: IEDM 2017, AMD Dr. Lisa Su keynote) more>

Manufacturing Predictions for the Next Decade

By Rob Spiegel – Digitalization in automation has been getting a lot of attention in the manufacturing industry over the past year. The popularity of emerging technology is partly due to the pandemic. COVID-19 unexpectedly accelerated the progress of digitalization in automation as factories worked to catch up on the production of essential supplies and run their operations with fewer workers.

2020 was just a peek into the coming technology deployment for manufacturers. Over the next 10 years, new technology will become common in plants. “The form of automation that will be coming in the next 10 years will be a transfer from looking at robotics as automation to looking at true collaborative learning systems,” Matthew Putman, CEO and co-founder of Nanotronics, told Design News. “This will involve robotics improving through artificial intelligence, and that artificial intelligence will improve through collaboration with people.”

Putman predicts that we’ll see the robot market produce equipment this is increasingly intelligent and connected across the network. “There will be more robotics, but more importantly, the robots will be working differently and intelligently. Rather than following human strategies and tactics, robotics will follow artificial intelligence (AI) tactics.” more>

Updates from Siemens

Designing large scale automation and robotic systems using Solid Edge
By David Chadwick – Precision Robotics and Automation Ltd (PARI) is a leading developer of automation and robotic systems globally. Their customers in the automotive sector include established giants like Ford, Chrysler, PSA, Daimler-Benz, Tata Motors, Mahindra, and new significant players like VinFast. PARI designs, manufactures and installs complete, automated systems including multi-station lines for machining and assembly of powertrain components and assemblies.

PARI has been a major user of Solid Edge for 15 years with 160 licenses deployed at their headquarters near Pune in India. Typical automation solutions deployed by PARI incorporate a wide variety of robots, actuators and sensors and other mechatronic items. These systems can comprise over 25,000 unique components.

Mangesh Kale, Managing Director of PARI describes their design process. “If a six-axis robot is required for a specific application then we use robots from major suppliers like FANUC, ABB and Kuka, or other makes specified by the customer. We typically receive 3D models from these manufacturers and we integrate these into our automation system designs. However, many applications demand gantry type robots that we design and manufacture ourselves. In a typical solution, about 60% of the design is using standardized commodities of PARI. However, custom parts are typically 40% of the design. For example, the gripper sub-assembly for any material handling solution is typically a custom design. This design meets specific application needs to handle components at different stages in the machining or assembly process. The customization required for assembly processes is even higher. We find that Solid Edge is a very powerful and flexible solution for designing these sub-systems.” more>

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Updates from McKinsey

Global emergence of electrified small-format mobility
Electric two- and three-wheel vehicles are gaining in popularity. What does the future hold for the market?
By Patrick Hertzke, Jitesh Khanna, Bhavesh Mittal, and Felix Richter – Inventors patented the first electric bikes back in the 1890s, but their innovations never garnered the same attention as other early-transportation milestones, including the first subways and the Model T Ford. Today, however, several trends have converged to bring e-bikes out of obscurity. Sales of electric vehicles (EVs) are increasing as governments crack down on emissions. Meanwhile, innovators have introduced new technologies and business models that are breathing life into the market for small-format EVs (those with two or three wheels). Improbable as it may seem, e-bikes could finally be having their day.

To gain more insight into the burgeoning market, we examined worldwide trends for small-format EVs, looking at both geographic growth patterns and the forces shaping the industry. Our analysis shed some light on strategies that can help OEMs and other players succeed as small-format EVs gain traction.

The sales figures for small-format EVs may initially seem modest. The market for two-wheel EVs (E2Ws) and three-wheel EVs (E3Ws) was valued at around $97 billion, or 4 percent of global auto sales. The sector has momentum, however, and global sales of E2Ws and E3Ws are increasing by more than 14 percent annually. (That figure excludes sales in China, which was an early adopter of small-format EVs and is thus experiencing slower growth.) By 2022, global sales of E2Ws and E3Ws could reach $150 billion.

It’s impossible to generalize about global sales trends, since transportation patterns and preferences vary widely by location, but some country-specific developments are striking. Take China: the country now accounts for around 30 percent of the global market for small-format EVs. What’s more, more than 80 percent of 2Ws in China are electrified, making it the dominant market by far in that category. The story may soon change, however, since growth of E2Ws is plateauing in China and surging in the European Union, Latin America, the Middle East and North Africa, and Southeast Asia.

India sells the largest number of E3Ws by far, and they now account for about half of all rickshaws in the country. By 2026, around 80 percent of 3Ws in India will be electric. One caveat: if more light commercial vehicles become electrified, they could become the default option for cargo transport, provided that their performance and economics improve.

Globally, we expect electrification to accelerate most quickly in the scooter and light-motorcycle segments. Electrification of heavy motorcycles will follow, but it won’t reach the levels seen with smaller vehicles. more>

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Updates from Siemens

Solid Edge 2021 Feature Highlights: Free CAD Models for Solid Edge Users
By Shannon Kruse -Solid Edge 2021 has been launched and with it comes a vast array of new capabilities and features for users! In this blog series, we will be highlighting a new capability every other week, allowing you to become familiar with the software and learn what Solid Edge 2021 has to offer.

This week’s blog post will be covering 3Dfindit.com, powered by CADENAS. 3Dfindit.com, an online visual search engine, streamlines the process of finding 3D models using advanced search functions such as classifications, geometry, filters, sketches and much more to allow you to significantly reduce technical search times and increase design efficiency.

3Dfindit.com for Solid Edge gives engineers like you a wide variety of intuitive search methods, making it easy to find the exact part you are looking for. You can create a rough model in Solid Edge and initiate a geometric search in 3Dfindit.com to find parts that are similar to that specific model. With millions of 2D and 3D CAD files verified by component manufacturers to choose from, you can easily select and configure the components that match your needs. Once the proper part is located, a single click places it directly into your active Solid Edge assembly.

CAD files of requested parts are automatically generated on the fly, ready to use in Solid Edge. Depending on the catalog, the digital parts are enriched with extensive metadata such as kinematics information to test motion sequences, centers of mass, material, environmental protection standards, order numbers, etc. This saves time by enabling engineers to find and deploy approved parts instead of manually creating them. more>

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Industry 4.0: the transformation of work?

‘Industry 4.0’ may be neither so extensive nor advanced as those in whom it arouses hopes and fears.
By Hartmut Hirsch-Kreinsen – It is widely believed that the new digital technologies are opening up completely new potential applications, with social and economic consequences no less than disruptive. In the public debate, this is linked on the one hand to fears of massive job losses, the discounting of qualifications and far-reaching control over workers. On the other hand, digitization is envisaged as facilitating innovative work design and decent working conditions, or ‘new work’.

This thesis cannot be fundamentally refuted. In a range of sectors—information technology, software and various service fields—digitization has been associated with sustained, far-reaching, structural change for many years. But this is by no means true of most sectors and work processes.

Contrary to expectations, as expressed especially in the German-initiated ‘Industry 4.0’ discourse, evidence shows that industrial production in particular has in recent years seen only moderate innovation patterns and transformative tendencies. Available empirical findings show this especially for the large German manufacturing sector and the same can be observed in many other European countries: the reality in most companies remains technically and organizationally very conservative.

Indeed, digitalization in industrial production has up to now been a path-dependent transformation of work processes. In the vast majority of companies there is no lasting change in work, nor are the much-discussed design options for ‘good work’ really being used.

Digitally-based process innovations in most companies proceed mainly incrementally, closely bound to given technological, functional, organizational and economic exigencies. While debate tends to focus on large, technologically ‘high-end’ companies, in most average-size and especially smaller firms digitalization takes place only step-wise and within limits. This is evident from statistical data on the spread of digital technologies in German industry, as well from case studies. more>