Tag Archives: Net evolution

Updates from ITU

The basis for safer digital finance
By Bilel Jamoussi – The transformations we are seeing in numerous fields – from energy and mobility to health care, agriculture, and financial services – all hinge on digital technologies, along with an array of associated business ecosystems. All these technologies and systems must be reliable, secure and deserving of our trust.

The Financial Inclusion Global Initiative (FIGI) is an open framework for collaboration led by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), the World Bank Group, and the Committee on Payments and Market Infrastructures (CPMI).

Our partnership brings together the expertise to accelerate digital financial inclusion. With the support of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, we have brought together the full range of stakeholders set to benefit from this expertise.

The World Bank Group and CPMI have helped to build a strong understanding of the policy considerations surrounding digital identity and incentivizing the use of electronic of payments.

ITU’s work has focused on security, infrastructure and trust – secure financial applications and services, reliable digital infrastructure, and the resulting consumer trust that our money and digital identities are safe. more>

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Updates from Ciena

Simplifying Open Submarine Cable Link Engineering
How can a new and better way to perform submarine cable link budgeting address challenges associated with the open submarine cable model? Brian Lavallée explains why the submarine network industry is moving towards these new metrics and how you can learn more in our new handbook.
By Brian Lavallée – Terrestrial networks leverage many optical line amplifiers and Reconfigurable Optical Add-Drop Multiplexer (ROADM) nodes to construct end-to-end networks. Fortunately, terrestrial amplifier and ROADM nodes are relatively simple to monitor to determine how each section contributes to end-to-end service performance, as each of these network elements provides a rich set of measured data.

Submarine cable systems are far more challenging because submerged repeaters (historical misnomer referring to optical amplifiers) and branching units provide only basic health status information. This design philosophy reduces the component count of undersea optoelectronics providing a higher overall reliability, which is a fundamental design goal of wet plants, because once deployed, they’re extremely expensive and time-consuming to repair. Given the limited information provided by most wet plants, end-to-end service performance must be determined from information provided by Submarine Line Terminal Equipment (SLTE) coherent optical modems connected at each end of a submarine cable.

The Open Submarine Cable business model

The industry is operating in a “quasi-open” submarine cable environment in that operators can and typically do select their wet plant from one vendor and their SLTE from another vendor, often much later, as wet plants take years to go from the designed to deployed stage. This quasi-open model allows operators to choose the latest and greatest SLTE, when and where needed, over the entire lifecycle of their wet plant allowing them to design and deploy a best-in-breed network tailored to their unique business requirements. more>

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Updates from Ciena

Navigating vendor equipment swaps: Minimizing risk while maximizing outcomes leveraging data-informed tools and automation
Vendor equipment swaps are typically complex from a technical as well as an operational standpoint due to the need to ensure network service continuity and stability during the transition process. Chris Antlitz details a real-world use case that involved multiple vendors and an aggressive timetable.
By Chris Antlitz – The increased focus on protecting critical infrastructure has prompted situations where communication service providers (CSPs) have had to adjust their networks, specifically to replace equipment provided by certain vendors that are deemed by governments in some countries to pose network security and/or customer privacy risks. These network adjustments typically involve swapping out gear from an unapproved vendor with gear from an approved vendor. Also referred to as vendor swaps, these situations are typically complex from a technical as well as an operational standpoint because the CSP needs to ensure network service continuity and performance is stable during the transition process.

Fortunately, there are approved vendors that have a proven track record of providing the replacement equipment and/or the services required to perform equipment swaps. There are also situations where multiple vendors participate in the swap, in some cases with one or more vendors providing equipment and one or more vendors providing the services as third parties.

In one such case, a large CSP with global operations had a DWDM network that required the replacement of thousands of circuits from one untrusted vendor with circuits from an approved vendor. To align with government mandates, the swap had an aggressive timetable of two years. The scope of the project also implicated network management systems (NMS), IP multimedia subsystems (IMS) and operational support systems (OSS) that were tied to the untrusted vendor’s equipment. more>

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Updates from Ciena

The future of 5G: How services will evolve
How enterprises understand, interact with, and derive value from their networks is being redefined. 5G, IoT, and the edge are working together to position CSPs, enterprises, and consumers to benefit, says Blue Planet’s Kailem Anderson.
By Kailem Anderson – Telcos should be both excited and cautious about the future of 5G networks. The technology has unprecedented game-changing potential for mobile network operators (MNOs) and communication service providers (CSPs), but it will require new business models and an agile, automated infrastructure to monetize it effectively. The question is, what kinds of services will recoup infrastructure investment? And how can that new infrastructure be used to build powerful revenue streams that will propel future business?

One thing is certain: Innovation can’t stop at the network layer. Even with 5G, connectivity will become a commodity when broadly deployed worldwide, just as 4G/LTE is today. Instead, CSPs must integrate services that use communication as a platform for connected experiences rather than simply offering the communication capability alone. They must not let themselves be relegated to mere connectivity partners, shouldering the infrastructure investment while over-the-top (OTT) providers use it to scoop up higher-margin revenues.

Network Slicing Is Key to Monetizing 5G

Network slicing is key to this transformation. This 5G technology enables operators to logically partition network resources for different applications, use-cases, or customers. In doing so, it creates opportunities to cut bottom-line costs and increase top-line revenues through new services. more>

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Updates from Ciena

No network left behind: How network as a sensor delivers full network visibility
The mission must continue – and that means networks must be up and secure, no matter what. Now more than ever before, networks can provide visibility at every layer, so agencies can identify and respond to service interruptions immediately. Network-as-a-sensor capabilities enable this deep awareness.
By Steve Alexander and George Holland – When we talk about network as a sensor, it’s really about using the network as a mechanism to pull information about the customer experience. It’s a way to provide deep insights about the current and future performance of the network without needing a set of external devices to gather that data. In the past, this would have required bolting lots of sensors and firewalls and other products onto the network. Now agencies can gain insights with the network elements themselves.

Networks continue to rapidly grow in capacity, complexity, and flexibility, and the historical approach of bolting sensors on doesn’t really scale in terms of cost or manpower to operate the network. And it’s hard for bolted-on equipment to evolve with the network. Having sensor capabilities built-in means, the network itself can grow and provide the visibility necessary to support future mission capabilities in government.

Network as a sensor helps agencies address several priorities. First, they want to converge the layers of the network for better visibility, all the way down to the fiber.

Second, agencies are taking cybersecurity much, much more seriously. To Steve’s point, they’re just not looking to strap on some firewalls or intrusion detection prevention systems. They want the network to actually become a sensor and eventually an enforcer that is capable of protecting itself. more>

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Reinventing the Internet for a society of change

By Francisco Jaime Quesado – The COVID-19 pandemic has led to the world to an unexpected opportunity wherein it can redesign the context and concept of the Internet for society.

The world is facing new and unprecedented strategic challenges as a result of the coronavirus outbreak, and the reinvention of the Internet is one strategic tool that could facilitate a new agenda for the future. This strategic process demands an effective push towards a more cooperative agenda, one that focuses on a prosperous and competitive economy, sustainable environment, and a more democratic, open, healthy society.

This reinvention process should be seen as a key and positive element that empowers both citizens and growing businesses to help build an innovative, secure and sustainable post-pandemic world.

More than ever, the society of change that we need demands a clear and balanced repositioning of the Internet, one that is fundamentally based on a full understanding of policy issues and the context to which they belong. Furthermore, a pragmatic strategy is needed for sustainable growth and prosperity so that the majority of society can respond to the following challenges that the world is now facing:

  • Transforming society into a high skill/high employment economy for a globalized environment;
  • Tackling the effects of an ageing population, while improving major public services;
  • This must be done in a way that takes into account foreseeable expenditures and environmental constraints;

It is absolutely critical that the world’s different social actors come to understand the extreme importance of these issues when it comes to promoting a real and effective process of reinventing the internet, particularly by the private citizens and various institutions who are decisive enablers of change. more>

Updates from Ciena

Rethinking NaaS as a journey to openness and automation
NaaS can feel like an abstract concept, and various misconceptions abound on what it is and what is possible. But as Blue Planet’s Kailem Anderson explains, NaaS has measurable and quantifiable benefits that are achievable today.
By Kailem Anderson – What is Network as a Service (NaaS)? It’s a simple enough question, but there is a lot of confusion in the marketplace about the answer.

Some common misconceptions or myths about NaaS are that it is just a new way for Communications Service Providers (CSPs) to sell virtualized services to enterprises, that its only about operations support system transformation through open and programmable APIs, or that it means the same thing as software-defined networking (SDN).

Perhaps the biggest misconception, however, is that NaaS isn’t real – that it is a futuristic goal. While NaaS is, indeed, a ‘future state’ vision for CSPs, they can and are using it in production environments today.

I like to think of NaaS as an evolutionary journey toward a network, operations and business architecture that is open, agile and automated. Successful completion of this journey will result in digital transformation that allows CSPs to take back control of their networks, save on operational costs, increase innovation, accelerate time to market, and improve customer experience. more>

Assess Your Supply Chain Security Now!

How would your supply chain hold up during a cyberattack? Now is the time to find out.
By John Blyler – Misery loves company and pandemics are no exception. Since the beginning of the COVID-19 chaos, global organizations have been reporting an increase in cyberattacks against their supply chains. Other reports predicted that supply chain security for 2020 was already going to be a weak spot. Recent security breaches, such as Ripple20, magnify the challenging circumstances companies can face should their organizations lack security in their supply chain infrastructure.

How should companies prepare for supply chain cyberattacks during COVID-19, for example, a breach among one of their suppliers or the financial repercussions they would face. To answer these questions and others, Design News sought out the answers from Gonda Lamberink, Global Senior Business Development Manager at UL. The company provides an assessment tool that helps manufacturers and integrators obtain a holistic view of their suppliers’ security postures through a fair and consistent evaluation method.

What are some of the difficulties in restarting a business with the easing of COVID-19 restrictions?

Due to the pandemic, UL perceives more of a shift, rather than new cybersecurity issues, including within supply chains. These cybersecurity issues are related to certain types of attacks with a larger number of people working from home and evolving supply chain sourcing strategies. more>

Updates from Ciena

Planning for 5G Success: A Tale of Two Operators
The industry is moving forward with 5G deployments, motivated by differentiated service offerings. Blue Planet’s Soumen Chatterjee describes how 5G Automation is helping two mobile network operators plan their own path to 5G success.
By Soumen Chatterjee – In my earlier blog, I wrote about the promise of 5G network slicing, which opens the door to a variety of service offerings, to support differentiated requirements across industry sectors. In the interim, the current challenging economic time of the coronavirus pandemic has given mobile network operators (MNOs) a chance to re-assess their 5G strategies and double-down on pursuing new service opportunities.

The shift in consumer lifestyle patterns may have impacted the timing of some 5G use cases – industrial automation demand may slow, but interest for multi-media remote sporting experiences is anticipated. 5G brings unprecedented opportunities to provide customers with new services and an exceptional user experience, given performance of up to 100 Gbps and latency in the order of 1 millisecond. But 5G also brings additional operational complexity with network slicing technology, new radios, rearchitected transport, and a virtualized 5G core. 5G needs automation in the backend to manage this increased complexity and to contain associated operational costs. For MNOs, automation is a must, not an option.

In my discussions with MNOs, it is apparent that planning for 5G deployments is heavily influenced by an operator’s legacy infrastructure – infrastructure that exists in the field and systems that exist in the network operations center (NOC). However, no matter the starting point, it is essential to have dynamic planning capabilities that simplify and accelerate each phase of the process.

At one incumbent mobile operator, they are planning to roll-out small cell 5G radios alongside their 4G radios, in non-standalone (NSA) mode. However, they first need to get visibility of their current network assets. Their legacy inventory and operational support systems (OSS) are disjointed, so it is difficult to obtain an accurate and comprehensive view.

Furthermore, those OSS are not up to the task of modelling new 5G constructs. It would be an extremely heavy lift to shoehorn 5G data in, with very limited scope for extensibility. On the other hand, introduction of a new system could further fragment or duplicate operational data.

This is when Blue Planet’s federation capabilities prove to be a crucial step for 5G planning. With Blue Planet’s 5G Automation solution, data from existing systems is federated, reconciled, and synchronized into a new unified data model built on state-of-the-art graph database technology which can accommodate complex 5G relationships. There are also existing business processes – mostly manual – that rely on OSS, which need to be modernized to support automated 5G workflows.

Another MNO customer is a new entrant who is not encumbered by pre-existing infrastructure and OSS, has more flexibility in designing new systems and processes to support their 5G strategy, and can implement them more quickly. This MNO is planning to deploy tens of thousands of 5G cell sites in standalone mode (SA) within a few years. To scale expediently, they need to design-in automation of their business processes from the outset. Blue Planet’s 5G Automation solution is a natural fit, as it provides multi-vendor service orchestration and assurance founded on a unified inventory of hybrid physical and virtual infrastructure

Beyond the radio infrastructure, both MNOs are looking ahead to architecting customizable network slices end-to-end across the radio access network (RAN), transport and cloud domains, to satisfy their customers’ requirements. To this end, Blue Planet provides the holistic operational system to help determine the placement of 5G Core (5GC) virtualized network functions (VNFs) at the edge or in the core, with necessary compute capacity, to best support a variety of latency and bandwidth needs. more>

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Updates from Ciena

Dealing with packet networking complexity? It’s time to evolutionize.
By Scott McFeely – As I travel around the world meeting with our customers, I hear time and time again about their continued struggles building and maintaining packet networks.

Today’s TDM and Packet (Ethernet/IP/MPLS) networks are too operationally complex, making them costly to operate, which results in a slower time-to-market and growing inflexibility to successfully address changing customer demands. Networks still lack the automation and agility to rapidly deploy new services.

If operators are to succeed, they need to make changes – now. The traditional approach to building packet networks, from access to metro, just isn’t up to the task.

At Ciena, we believe that the future belongs to the adaptive – those who do more than just recognize the need to modernize, but who see the need to actively “evolutionize” their packet networks toward a more virtual, modular, and automated design. more>

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