Tag Archives: Net evolution

Reinventing the Internet for a society of change

By Francisco Jaime Quesado – The COVID-19 pandemic has led to the world to an unexpected opportunity wherein it can redesign the context and concept of the Internet for society.

The world is facing new and unprecedented strategic challenges as a result of the coronavirus outbreak, and the reinvention of the Internet is one strategic tool that could facilitate a new agenda for the future. This strategic process demands an effective push towards a more cooperative agenda, one that focuses on a prosperous and competitive economy, sustainable environment, and a more democratic, open, healthy society.

This reinvention process should be seen as a key and positive element that empowers both citizens and growing businesses to help build an innovative, secure and sustainable post-pandemic world.

More than ever, the society of change that we need demands a clear and balanced repositioning of the Internet, one that is fundamentally based on a full understanding of policy issues and the context to which they belong. Furthermore, a pragmatic strategy is needed for sustainable growth and prosperity so that the majority of society can respond to the following challenges that the world is now facing:

  • Transforming society into a high skill/high employment economy for a globalized environment;
  • Tackling the effects of an ageing population, while improving major public services;
  • This must be done in a way that takes into account foreseeable expenditures and environmental constraints;

It is absolutely critical that the world’s different social actors come to understand the extreme importance of these issues when it comes to promoting a real and effective process of reinventing the internet, particularly by the private citizens and various institutions who are decisive enablers of change. more>

Updates from Ciena

Rethinking NaaS as a journey to openness and automation
NaaS can feel like an abstract concept, and various misconceptions abound on what it is and what is possible. But as Blue Planet’s Kailem Anderson explains, NaaS has measurable and quantifiable benefits that are achievable today.
By Kailem Anderson – What is Network as a Service (NaaS)? It’s a simple enough question, but there is a lot of confusion in the marketplace about the answer.

Some common misconceptions or myths about NaaS are that it is just a new way for Communications Service Providers (CSPs) to sell virtualized services to enterprises, that its only about operations support system transformation through open and programmable APIs, or that it means the same thing as software-defined networking (SDN).

Perhaps the biggest misconception, however, is that NaaS isn’t real – that it is a futuristic goal. While NaaS is, indeed, a ‘future state’ vision for CSPs, they can and are using it in production environments today.

I like to think of NaaS as an evolutionary journey toward a network, operations and business architecture that is open, agile and automated. Successful completion of this journey will result in digital transformation that allows CSPs to take back control of their networks, save on operational costs, increase innovation, accelerate time to market, and improve customer experience. more>

Assess Your Supply Chain Security Now!

How would your supply chain hold up during a cyberattack? Now is the time to find out.
By John Blyler – Misery loves company and pandemics are no exception. Since the beginning of the COVID-19 chaos, global organizations have been reporting an increase in cyberattacks against their supply chains. Other reports predicted that supply chain security for 2020 was already going to be a weak spot. Recent security breaches, such as Ripple20, magnify the challenging circumstances companies can face should their organizations lack security in their supply chain infrastructure.

How should companies prepare for supply chain cyberattacks during COVID-19, for example, a breach among one of their suppliers or the financial repercussions they would face. To answer these questions and others, Design News sought out the answers from Gonda Lamberink, Global Senior Business Development Manager at UL. The company provides an assessment tool that helps manufacturers and integrators obtain a holistic view of their suppliers’ security postures through a fair and consistent evaluation method.

What are some of the difficulties in restarting a business with the easing of COVID-19 restrictions?

Due to the pandemic, UL perceives more of a shift, rather than new cybersecurity issues, including within supply chains. These cybersecurity issues are related to certain types of attacks with a larger number of people working from home and evolving supply chain sourcing strategies. more>

Updates from Ciena

Planning for 5G Success: A Tale of Two Operators
The industry is moving forward with 5G deployments, motivated by differentiated service offerings. Blue Planet’s Soumen Chatterjee describes how 5G Automation is helping two mobile network operators plan their own path to 5G success.
By Soumen Chatterjee – In my earlier blog, I wrote about the promise of 5G network slicing, which opens the door to a variety of service offerings, to support differentiated requirements across industry sectors. In the interim, the current challenging economic time of the coronavirus pandemic has given mobile network operators (MNOs) a chance to re-assess their 5G strategies and double-down on pursuing new service opportunities.

The shift in consumer lifestyle patterns may have impacted the timing of some 5G use cases – industrial automation demand may slow, but interest for multi-media remote sporting experiences is anticipated. 5G brings unprecedented opportunities to provide customers with new services and an exceptional user experience, given performance of up to 100 Gbps and latency in the order of 1 millisecond. But 5G also brings additional operational complexity with network slicing technology, new radios, rearchitected transport, and a virtualized 5G core. 5G needs automation in the backend to manage this increased complexity and to contain associated operational costs. For MNOs, automation is a must, not an option.

In my discussions with MNOs, it is apparent that planning for 5G deployments is heavily influenced by an operator’s legacy infrastructure – infrastructure that exists in the field and systems that exist in the network operations center (NOC). However, no matter the starting point, it is essential to have dynamic planning capabilities that simplify and accelerate each phase of the process.

At one incumbent mobile operator, they are planning to roll-out small cell 5G radios alongside their 4G radios, in non-standalone (NSA) mode. However, they first need to get visibility of their current network assets. Their legacy inventory and operational support systems (OSS) are disjointed, so it is difficult to obtain an accurate and comprehensive view.

Furthermore, those OSS are not up to the task of modelling new 5G constructs. It would be an extremely heavy lift to shoehorn 5G data in, with very limited scope for extensibility. On the other hand, introduction of a new system could further fragment or duplicate operational data.

This is when Blue Planet’s federation capabilities prove to be a crucial step for 5G planning. With Blue Planet’s 5G Automation solution, data from existing systems is federated, reconciled, and synchronized into a new unified data model built on state-of-the-art graph database technology which can accommodate complex 5G relationships. There are also existing business processes – mostly manual – that rely on OSS, which need to be modernized to support automated 5G workflows.

Another MNO customer is a new entrant who is not encumbered by pre-existing infrastructure and OSS, has more flexibility in designing new systems and processes to support their 5G strategy, and can implement them more quickly. This MNO is planning to deploy tens of thousands of 5G cell sites in standalone mode (SA) within a few years. To scale expediently, they need to design-in automation of their business processes from the outset. Blue Planet’s 5G Automation solution is a natural fit, as it provides multi-vendor service orchestration and assurance founded on a unified inventory of hybrid physical and virtual infrastructure

Beyond the radio infrastructure, both MNOs are looking ahead to architecting customizable network slices end-to-end across the radio access network (RAN), transport and cloud domains, to satisfy their customers’ requirements. To this end, Blue Planet provides the holistic operational system to help determine the placement of 5G Core (5GC) virtualized network functions (VNFs) at the edge or in the core, with necessary compute capacity, to best support a variety of latency and bandwidth needs. more>

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Updates from Ciena

Dealing with packet networking complexity? It’s time to evolutionize.
By Scott McFeely – As I travel around the world meeting with our customers, I hear time and time again about their continued struggles building and maintaining packet networks.

Today’s TDM and Packet (Ethernet/IP/MPLS) networks are too operationally complex, making them costly to operate, which results in a slower time-to-market and growing inflexibility to successfully address changing customer demands. Networks still lack the automation and agility to rapidly deploy new services.

If operators are to succeed, they need to make changes – now. The traditional approach to building packet networks, from access to metro, just isn’t up to the task.

At Ciena, we believe that the future belongs to the adaptive – those who do more than just recognize the need to modernize, but who see the need to actively “evolutionize” their packet networks toward a more virtual, modular, and automated design. more>

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Updates from Ciena

The Adaptive Network: Why automation alone isn’t enough
By Keri Gilder – Just imagine, instead of 70, your heart rate was at 100 beats per minute. This could be a warning sign that you are on the verge of having a heart attack.

If your doctor were to get this information in real time, they could check the readings against your medical records and see that this is completely out of the norm and then warn you to seek medical assistance immediately.

However, if your personal trainer received that same information, would they reach the same conclusion as your doctor? Your trainer has access to a different database, which might show your resting heart rate as well as the rate during high-intensity training. Knowing that you are likely exercising, they would instead conclude that there is no need to go to the hospital after all.

This clearly demonstrates that just accepting raw data without filtering and proper analysis is no longer good enough and can potentially have serious repercussions. Instead, it is critical that we have diversity of thought when it comes to how we interpret data.

This is not just true for our health or other day-to-day scenarios, but can also be applied to the communication networks that carry and house our information. more>

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Guidelines to Achieve Digital Transformation

GSR-18 BEST PRACTICE GUIDELINES ON NEW REGULATORY FRONTIERS TO ACHIEVE DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION
itu.int – Digitization is increasingly and fundamentally changing societies and economies and disrupting many sectors in what has been termed the 4th Industrial Revolution. Meanwhile, ICT regulation has evolved globally over the past ten years and has experienced steady transformation.

As regulators, we need to keep pace with advances in technology, address the new regulatory frontiers and create the foundation upon which digital transformation can achieve its full potential. Being prepared for digital transformation and emerging technologies such as Artificial Intelligence (AI), the Internet of Things (IoT), Machine to Machine communications (M2M) and 5G is fundamental.

Advances in technology are creating new social phenomena and business models that impact every aspect of our personal and professional lives – and which challenge regulatory paradigms. M2M, cloud computing, 5G, AI and IoT are all bringing further profound change. Recognizing the potential of emerging technologies and the impact that policy and regulatory frameworks can have on their success, regulators should encourage a regulatory paradigm pushing frontiers and enabling the digital transformation. more> draft doc (pdf)

Updates from Ciena

Why the Secret Behind Strong Early Adoption of 400G Technology is … 200G

By Helen Xenos – This month, we shipped our 5,000th 400G-capable coherent optical transponder, confirming our prediction that the use of 400G technology is ramping 3 times faster than 100G.  What may come as a surprise, however, is that the dominant application driving 400G deployments is not 400G, but 200G (long haul-datacenter interconnect to be precise).

Why? The technology that enables 400G wavelengths has a lot to do with expanding the application space for 200G as well.

To fully understand the demand drivers for 400G, it’s important to clarify the various ways 400G is defined. The term “400G” is quite popular in today’s optical networking conversations, but can also have different meanings depending on the context in which it is being used.

So, which applications are driving 400G deployments? We hear so much about the fast-growing metro WDM market, 400ZR and the need to maximize capacity for short reach DCI applications, that intuitively you would think this is the “sweet spot” application.

In fact, the most popular use case we see for early 400G adoption is to support the rise of 200G long-haul for aggressive DCI network builds. more>

Updates from Ciena

4 Data Center Interconnect Developments You Need to Know
By Kent Jordan – The Data Center Interconnect (DCI) market is evolving rapidly and new compact, modular devices have been introduced to help network operators quickly and easily deploy new capacity to keep up with demand. But, as the adage says, “the more things change, the more they stay the same”. So, what’s new with DCI and what hasn’t changed in the last year?

One thing that hasn’t changed is the need for more interconnect capacity. Interconnect bandwidth growth is still on the rise, and it’s growing rapidly. By 2020, interconnect bandwidth has been forecasted to grow up to 5,000 Tbps, with double-digit growth rates across a variety of industry segments from Cloud and IT to Healthcare and Energy. All are poised to experience large capacity growth in the coming years, which means many of the same challenges from the past year still exist.

Network operators are challenged with keeping up with growing demand and offering content and/or services globally. They also have a need for automation to speed bandwidth activation and improve their customers’ quality of experience. On-going operational costs remain a challenge as well, with a need to reduce footprint and power consumption. more>

Updates from Adobe

Variable Fonts Are the Future of Web Type
By Mandy Michael – A variable font is a single file that acts like multiple fonts. Variable fonts can improve page-load times, but their appeal goes way beyond that: Site visitors get an improved reading experience, and designers get greater creative freedom.

While it’s still early days, some software applications—including the latest Illustrator and Photoshop—and many web browsers do support the technology, and more will follow. It’s a good time to understand how variable fonts work and how to use them in your web designs.

Inventive type designers aren’t restricting themselves to expected variations, such as weight, width, or italic. They’re creating variations that address effect, readability, and style. more>

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