Tag Archives: Program Lifecycle Management

Updates from Siemens

Redefine the Line: How automotive trends are changing the ways we move from point A to B
By Tarun Tejpal – The automotive industry has been one of the most dynamic and exciting incubators of technological and product innovation in the modern world. A unique mix of investment, consumer interest, and industry competition has driven this dynamism with a constant search for the next feature, style, or capability to capture the public imagination. At the 1964 New York World’s Fair, General Motors (GM) hoped to capture such interest with the Firebird IV concept car. GM explained, then, that the Firebird IV “anticipates the day when the family will drive to the super-highway, turn over the car’s controls to an automatic, programmed guidance system and travel in comfort and absolute safety at more than twice the speed possible on today’s expressways.” (Gao, Hensley, & Zielke, 2014).

GM’s vision of the future was striking and exciting, but the technology did not yet exist to make it a reality. Ford took a different approach to generating buzz in the market, focusing on the present. Instead of forecasting a future of self-driving cars and super highways, Ford launched a car for “young America out to have a good time”: the Mustang (Gao et al., 2014). It engaged the new generation by providing both transportation and personal expression in a stylish, highly configurable, and inexpensive package. Ford estimated it would sell 100,000 Mustangs, but one year after the launch it had sold over 400,000 (Gao et al., 2014).

Vehicles are now a central feature of everyday life. Since 1964, global vehicle sales have grown by nearly 3 percent on average each year, nearly double the rate of population growth, resulting in one billion vehicles on the road today (Gao et al., 2014).

However, large-scale trends, such as a surging Chinese automotive market, electrification, and urbanization, are beginning to affect the form and function of vehicles and personal mobility systems. more>

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Updates from Siemens

Digitalization takes off in aerospace
By Indrakanti Chakravarthy – When you think about it, the basic mechanics behind aviation has remained the same throughout the decades.

Whether you’re talking about the B-52 Bomber from the mid-1950s. …The Concord SST that whisked folks across the Atlantic. …Or even the much-loved NASA Space Shuttle program. So many wonderful examples of how humans have taken flight over the years.

And here’s the thing – generations of engineers for the past 50 years or so have designed and built aircraft using pretty much the same methods and disciplines.

But all that’s about to change…

Today, with digitalization and the use of the digital twin for aircraft design, development and manufacturing – we are seeing a major shift on how modern aircraft are being designed and built. For the first time ever, the future of flight is boundless. There is no horizon on what we can or cannot do. [VIDEO] more>

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Updates from Siemens

The Changing Face of Simulation
By Joy LePree – Simulation software and its capabilities have come a long way in recent years. The latest versions include easier-to-use and more advanced features, increased computing speeds and simplified integration with other simulation programs, as well as data analytics and Industry 4.0 technologies. These modern features allow today’s simulation tools to be employed in a variety of applications throughout the lifecycle of a plant.

As a result, chemical processors are using simulation not only for design and optimization tasks, but also for other challenges, such as increasing safety and avoiding operational risk, achieving sustainability goals and training employees.

While simulation has become the de facto method for designing and optimizing processes in the chemical process industries (CPI), for many years, users didn’t apply the technology to other types of analysis, such as overall profitability, safety issues or smaller engineering problems, because it took too long to get an answer or because the simulators were too difficult to set up and use. As a result, some software providers have built solutions with lower-fidelity models that are easier to build and use. Meanwhile, other providers have taken steps to increase speed of calculations and simplify the use of rigorous process simulators.

Another change Chemstations has made is to increase the computing speed of its rigorous process simulator by taking advantage of parallel processing, which uses all available computing cores. “This means that instead of using just one core of the user’s computer, we can spread the workload across as many cores as are available, which will speed the process considerably,” explains Brown. While the initial intent of the improved calculation time was to allow faster execution of large optimization projects, the increased speed opens the door for simulation of smaller-scale projects and “what-if” studies. more>

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Updates from Siemens

Program Lifecycle Management for Consumer Products & Retail

Siemens – The pace of innovation in the consumer products industry is constantly rising and driving a need for more flexible and collaborative tools based on best practices for project, program and lifecycle management. Companies expect solutions to connect processes, automate tasks and be intuitive for the broad audience of roles involved in their processes.

Taking an integrated approach is mandatory in today’s complicated and competitive market. Only by combining product lifecycle information with program and project management methodologies can the true operational potential of a company be unlocked.

Program lifecycle management is a methodology that provides a solution based on a collaboration platform. It addresses essential needs of the consumer product and retail industry, both in terms of offered functionality and flexibility. more>