Tag Archives: United States

Updates from Boeing

Analyzing the 2017 Orders & Deliveries Race
By Randy Tinseth – For the 6th year in a row, Boeing out-delivered the competition and set a new industry record by pushing 763 airplanes out the door.

At the start of 2017, we set a delivery target of 760 to 765 airplanes. To land in the middle of that target speaks to the dedication of our employees and supplier partners to deliver on the commitments to our customers. You’ve heard me say it before—deliveries matter. It’s the true measure of success, and we nailed it once again in 2017 at the same time we went up on 737 production rate and introduced the MAX.

Our net order total of 912 commercial airplanes was the 7th largest yearly order book in Boeing’s more than 100-year history. Not only was our order book big, it was deep and broad. Our sales team took in orders from 71 customers across the globe. The 737 MAX had another strong year, fueled in part by the MAX 10 launch. And anytime you can book almost 200 twin-aisle airplanes with products clearly preferred by the market, it’s a good year. The sales success we had in 2017 once again confirms our strategy to raise production rates on the 737 and 787 programs. more>

The danger in deregulation

By Samantha Gross – In the United States and around the world, energy production depends on support from local communities, what the industry calls “social license to operate.” Especially in a democracy, public opposition can make life very difficult for energy producers. Public support for energy resource development depends on trust—in the companies doing the development and in the regulatory structure that governs their activities.

When the Trump administration dismantles energy regulation, it runs the risk of undermining the trust that underpins domestic energy development. U.S. oil and gas production has grown dramatically in recent years, but we have also seen a public backlash.

The proposal to open nearly all U.S. offshore waters to drilling is an opening salvo in a battle likely to go on for some time. Many governors, even Republicans, are vehemently opposed to drilling in waters off their states.

But the hard push toward deregulation is likely to have consequences for public trust, not just in companies, but in government itself. If the public feels that the government is being run by and for the energy industry, accomplishing many important societal goals—like modernizing infrastructure and preventing the worst impacts of climate change—become much more difficult. more>

Updates from Siemens

2017 in Review: Best Teamcenter Topics on Enterprise PDM to PLM
By Katie_Dudek – If you’ve been watching the Teamcenter blog, you know we covered a range of topics from enterprise PDM (product data management) to PLM (product lifecycle management) in 2017, with a focus on showing how Teamcenter is easier to use and deploy than ever before … along with the breadth of our portfolio to reach new users!

Best Practices Implementing Workflow
By Susan Zimmerlee – Companies look to workflow on PLM as one of the tools to improve productivity, let’s discuss some best practices that will help ensure that you are focusing on this end goal, and not just making a manual process electronic. more>

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Donald Trump and the Rule of Law

By Jeffrey Toobin – Richard Nixon earned eternal disgrace for keeping a list of his political enemies, but he, at least, was ashamed enough of the practice to know that he had to keep it secret. Trump, in contrast, is openly calling for the Department of Justice, which he controls, to put his political opponents in jail.

This kind of behavior is a trademark of the authoritarians he admires, like Vladimir Putin and Recep Tayyip Erdoğan.

Trump’s contempt for the rule of law infects his entire Administration, as illustrated by Jeff Sessions’s newly announced guidance on marijuana policy.

Under the new policy, in much of the country federal marijuana enforcement will be run by officials who are only accountable to Sessions and Trump, not to the broader public.

Senators have a right to ask prospective U.S. Attorneys how they plan to enforce federal law on marijuana, and, of course, the legislators have the right to vote these officials down if they don’t like their answers. But Sessions has installed acting U.S. Attorneys in much of the country—including in such high-profile locations as Manhattan and Los Angeles—and senators can’t exert any oversight of them.

This gesture of contempt for the Senate’s role in confirmations is reflected well beyond the Justice Department. Throughout the government, Trump has nominated many fewer officials to Senate-confirmed positions than his predecessors; instead, Cabinet secretaries have filled these crucial positions with acting or temporary officials who avoid scrutiny from senators. more>

Intel flaws hint at tech “too big to fail” risk

By Liam Proud, Robert Cyran – Tech groups like Amazon, Facebook and Alphabet are attracting increasing political heat for their dominance of markets like e-commerce, social media and web search.

But a recently discovered security flaw in chips made by Intel, Advanced Micro Devices and ARM highlights another important concern: bugs potentially affecting hardware found in the majority of computing devices.

Scale helps justify the massive investment needed to develop improved semiconductor technology and produce chips. Intel last year said it would spend $7 billion on a U.S. factory, and it had already started building the facility years ago. The dominance of a few players also helps ensure compatibility between machines. The downside is that hardware flaws like the newly revealed Meltdown and Spectre affect a huge number of users and could become systemic.

It’s an analogous problem to vulnerabilities in the once-dominant Microsoft Windows operating system – or, in the agricultural world, to a disease affecting widely used crop variety, like the preponderant but under-threat Cavendish banana.a more>

We’re witnessing the wholesale looting of America

By Matthew Yglesias – Over the course of 2017, both in Congress and in the executive branch, we have watched the task of government devolve into the full-scale looting of America.

Politicians are making decisions to enrich their donors — and at times themselves personally — with a reckless disregard for any kind of objective policy analysis or consideration of public opinion.

Members of Congress who under other circumstances might be constrained by shame, custom, or the will of their constituents have learned from Trump’s election that you can get away with more than we used to think.

Norm erosion is real, and it matters. Economists Daron Acemoglu and Matthew Jackson of MIT and Stanford have written about how rules are only effective when they are backed up by social norms “because detection relies, at least in part, on whistle-blowing.” Their Spanish colleague Patricia Funk emphasizes that in a variety of contexts, “the strength of the social norm of ‘not committing a crime’ is shaped by social interactions.”

These scholars are all considering deep, long-lasting differences in cultural norms, but we also know from experience that norms can sometimes shift dramatically in unusual circumstances.

The country is left only to hope that it doesn’t last too long. more>

Brookings experts on Trump’s National Security Strategy

Brookings Institution – The United States was born of a desire for life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness—and a conviction that unaccountable political power is tyranny.

For these reasons, our Founders crafted and ratified the Constitution, establishing the republican form of government we enjoy today. The Constitution grants our national government not only specified powers necessary to protect our God-given rights and liberties but also safeguards them by limiting the government’s size and scope, separating Federal powers, and protecting the rights of individuals through the rule of law. All political power is ultimately delegated from, and accountable to, the people.

We protect American sovereignty by defending these institutions, traditions, and principles that have allowed us to live in freedom, to build the nation that we love. And we prize our national heritage, for the rare and fragile institutions of republican government can only endure if they are sustained by a culture that cherishes those institutions.

We are committed to protecting the rights and dignity of every citizen. And we are a nation of laws, because the rule of law is the shield that protects the individual from government corruption and abuse of power, allows families to live without fear, and permits markets to thrive.

Our founding principles have made the United States of America among the greatest forces for good in history.

The United States will respond to the growing political, economic, and military competitions we face around the world.

China and Russia challenge American power, influence, and interests, attempting to erode American security and prosperity. They are determined to make economies less free and less fair, to grow their militaries, and to control information and data to repress their societies and expand their influence.

These competitions require the United States to rethink the policies of the past two decades—policies based on the assumption that engagement with rivals and their inclusion in international institutions and global commerce would turn them into benign actors and trustworthy partners. For the most part, this premise turned out to be false. more>

Ignoring the Will of the People

By Susan Milligan – The $1.5 trillion tax bill, hailed with glee and relief by Republicans eager to appease donors and desperate for the year’s first major legislative win, is the most unpopular major piece of legislation to pass in decades.

“It has a lot to do with money,” says Lee Miringoff, director of the nonpartisan Marist Institute for Public Opinion in Poughkeepsie, New York, pointing to the “Citizens United” Supreme Court case which allowed corporations and interest groups to spend massive amounts of money to influence elections.

“We see the tremendous impact of the lobby community in the tax bill. Lobbying interests were very much dominant in drafting and creating this approach.” And that means public opinion, so painstakingly quantified by pollsters candidates themselves hire, is often disregarded.

On several major issues in the news, the views of the public at large appear to have no effect on Congress.

As for the tax bill, “the Republicans are betting that by the time people realize what a turkey this bill is, it will be somebody else’s problem,” Stan Collender says. And that problem may be dumped onto the tax bill-hating Democrats, should they succeed in wresting control of Congress. more>

The Internet of Things Is Going to Change Everything About Cybersecurity

By Yevgeny Dibrov – Despite increased spending and innovation in the cybersecurity market, there is every indication that the situation will only worsen. The number of unmanaged devices being introduced onto networks daily is increasing by orders of magnitude, with Gartner predicting there will be 20 billion in use by 2020.

Traditional security solutions will not be effective in addressing these devices or in protecting them from hackers, which should be a red flag, as attacks on IoT devices were up 280% in the first part of 2017.

In fact, Gartner anticipates a third of all attacks will target shadow IT and IoT by 2020.

This new threat landscape is changing the security game. Executives who are preparing to handle future cybersecurity challenges with the same mindset and tools that they’ve been using all along are setting themselves up for continued failure.

There is much debate over the effectiveness of security and awareness training, centered on competing beliefs that humans can either be the most effective or weakest links in security chains. It can’t be denied, however, that in the age of increased social-engineering attacks and unmanaged device usage, reliance on a human-based strategy is questionable at best.

It is time to relieve your people (employees, partners, customers, etc.) of the cybersecurity burden. more>

Is another debt crisis on the way?

By Kemal Derviş – Economic growth is accelerating across most of the world. Yet the world’s total gross debt-to-GDP ratio has reached nearly 250 percent, up from 210 percent before the global economic crisis nearly a decade ago, despite post-crisis efforts by regulators in many important economies to drive the banking sector to deleverage. This has raised doubts about the sustainability of the recovery, with some arguing that a rise in interest rates could trigger another global crisis. But how likely is that to happen?

To answer this question, one must recall that debt is both a liability and an asset. In a closed economy—and we don’t owe anything to non-Earthlings—overall debt and the corresponding assets necessarily cancel each other out. So what really matters is the composition of debts and liabilities—or, to put it simply, who owes what to whom.

As long as the geopolitical situation remains manageable, policymakers should have time to implement the needed structural reforms. But the window of opportunity will not stay open forever. If policymakers waste time on trickle-down sophistry, as is happening in the U.S., the world may be headed for severe economic distress. more>