DHS is Collecting Biometrics on Thousands of Refugees Who Will Never Enter the U.S. | Nextgov


The Homeland Security Department months ago started collecting biometric information on every refugee who is referred for resettlement in the U.S., and it retains the data even if those people never set foot in the country.

Every year, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees sends profiles on tens of thousands of refugees to federal agencies, which uses that information to determine if the person can enter the country. Those profiles contain biographic information like name, birthday and country of origin, and as of late, they also include biometric data.

Source: DHS is Collecting Biometrics on Thousands of Refugees Who Will Never Enter the U.S. – Nextgov

Traveling to This Airport? Bring Your Own Water Bottle. | Route Fifty


Travelers passing through San Francisco can add a new item to their packing lists: a reusable water bottle.

As of Tuesday, San Francisco International Airport became the first airport in the country to ban the sale of single-use plastic water bottles, the latest step in the facility’s larger goal to generate zero waste by 2021.

Source: Traveling to This Airport? Bring Your Own Water Bottle. – Route Fifty

Agencies With Acting Leaders Can Now Fill Top Career Ranks, OPM Says | Government Executive


The Trump administration announced last week it will start processing new top-ranking senior executives even when their agencies are without a top leader, breaking from previous policy.

The move will hasten the process for onboarding members of the Senior Executive Service and enable agencies to respond to their most critical needs, acting Office of Personnel Management Margaret Weichert said in a recent memorandum.

The move comes as the administration faces historic levels of vacancies filled by non-Senate-confirmed agency leaders and President Trump continues to boast he prefers “acting” leaders to avoid the confirmation process.

Source: Agencies With Acting Leaders Can Now Fill Top Career Ranks, OPM Says – Government Executive

Italian PM Conte resigns | POLITICO


Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte announced his resignation Tuesday, setting the country on an uncertain political course that could lead to a snap election or a new governing alliance.

Conte’s move preempted a confidence vote that had been expected to take place 12 days after Matteo Salvini, leader of the far-right League party and Italy’s interior minister, called for such a motion.

Source: Italian PM Conte resigns – POLITICO

How petabytes are crushing the security classification system | FCW

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The official in charge of overseeing the federal government’s information classification policy is warning that the current system is beginning to break – and he wants help and money to fix it.

Mark Bradley, the director of the Information Security Oversight Office, wrote in his report to the president covering classified national security information and controlled unclassified information for fiscal year 2018 that the current system “creates electronic petabytes of classified and controlled unclassified data each month, a deluge that we expect will continue to grow unabated.” That report was publicly released today.

Source: How petabytes are crushing the security classification system — FCW

At Least 2,300 People Detained During Lockdown in Kashmir | Time


Those arrested include anti-India protesters as well as pro-India Kashmiri leaders who have been held in jails and other makeshift facilities, according to three police officials.

The officials have access to all police records but spoke on the condition of anonymity because they weren’t authorized to talk to reporters and feared reprisals from superiors.

Source: At Least 2,300 People Detained During Lockdown in Kashmir | Time

The US Army Is Struggling to Staff Its Cyber Units: GAO | Defense One

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The U.S. Army is struggling to staff, train, and equip its new cyber and electronic warfare units, and officials haven’t assessed how those challenges will affect the Pentagon’s digital capabilities, according to a congressional watchdog.

In recent years, the Army has been rapidly expanding its cyber capabilities to stay ahead of the growing digital threats posed by adversaries like Russia and China, but the Government Accountability Office found the service is having a tough time keeping up with its ambitious plans.

The Army activated two digital warfare units last year despite personnel shortages, auditors said, and officials are struggling to update the equipment and doctrine used to train soldiers.

Source: The US Army Is Struggling to Staff Its Cyber Units: GAO – Defense One

Twitter, Facebook Turn Off Hundreds of Accounts Linked to Chinese Disinformation about Hong Kong Protests | Defense One


The Hong Kong protests represent a first major test for the Chinese government’s nascent social media operation. It’s not known how many people are involved, but at least one estimate cited by cybersecurity and intelligence company Recorded Future in March said that a half million people in China could be working for the government to influence Chinese speakers around the world. The report estimated that 18 percent of the social media posts in China came from government sources.

Despite the size of the Chinese social media manipulation operation, evidence from Twitter and Facebook suggests it’s not yet very sophisticated.

Source: Twitter, Facebook Turn Off Hundreds of Accounts Linked to Chinese Disinformation about Hong Kong Protests – Defense One

The US Just Launched a Long-Outlawed Missile. Welcome to the Post-INF World | Defense One


With the test-launch of a ground-based missile that flew more than 500 kilometers, the United States strode boldly into a future that past leaders had tried to avoid.

The missile was a “variant of the Tomahawk Land Attack Cruise Missile,” Air Force Lt. Col. Robert Carver, a DoD spokesman, told Military.com, launched by the U.S. Navy and DoD’s Strategic Capabilities Office.

Source: The US Just Launched a Long-Outlawed Missile. Welcome to the Post-INF World – Defense One

Climate change could rain on Saudi Aramco’s IPO parade | Reuters


Saudi Aramco’s biggest asset could also be a liability.

The state energy giant’s vast oil reserves – it can sustain current production levels for the next 50 years – make it more exposed than any other company to a rising tide of environmental activism and shift away from fossil fuels.

Source: Climate change could rain on Saudi Aramco’s IPO parade – Reuters