Trump Accepts Larry Flynt’s Ten-Million-Dollar Offer for Information Leading to His Impeachment | The New Yorker


According to Flynt, shortly after their phone conversation Trump sent him a voluminous number of e-mails, phone records, and other evidence of impeachable offenses, after which Flynt wired ten million dollars to Trump’s Swiss bank account.

“That was a lot easier than I thought it would be, to be honest,” Flynt told reporters.

Source: Trump Accepts Larry Flynt’s Ten-Million-Dollar Offer for Information Leading to His Impeachment | The New Yorker

The Political Awakening of Silicon Valley | The California Sunday Magazine


Silicon Valley’s leaders were experiencing a rare and remarkable paroxysm of self-doubt.

It wasn’t just their sense that they’d poorly deployed their wealth or that, cloistered on the West Coast, they’d misjudged the electorate. They were also coming to wonder if they’d helped create the circumstances that led to Trump’s rise.

After the election, Mark Zuckerberg acknowledged Facebook’s role in polarizing citizens by surfacing articles that reinforced their worldviews.

Faced with accusations that Twitter had helped Trump set up a one-man propaganda machine, Ev Williams, the company’s co-founder, told The New York Times, “If it’s true that he wouldn’t be president if it weren’t for Twitter, then yeah, I’m sorry.”

As it became clearer that Silicon Valley’s incessant disruption of older industries contributed to the numbers of underemployed, underpaid Rust Belters who’d helped put Trump in office …

Source: The Political Awakening of Silicon Valley — The California Sunday Magazine

Congress faces a crucial test on war powers | TheHill


If there’s been a single, clear, consistent foreign policy message that’s emerged from the last decade of U.S. elections, it’s simple: Voters are exhausted of open-ended, expensive, destructive, and unaccountable foreign wars.

From President Bush’s “thumping” in the 2006 midterms to the resonance of retrenchment rhetoric from leaders ranging from Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) to President Trump, it’s evident that Americans across the political spectrum want the federal government to exercise more prudence and humility when it comes to foreign conflicts.

What’s unclear is whether Congress has gotten the message. But In the coming weeks, we should find out.

Source: Congress faces a crucial test on war powers | TheHill

Trump gambles with ObamaCare moves | TheHill


“Their destructive actions and the actions of the president are going to fall on their backs.”

The administration announced late Thursday evening that it wouldn’t continue ObamaCare insurer payments, a decision that could come back to haunt Republicans politically.

The administration had been making the cost-sharing reduction (CSR) payments — which compensate insurers for lowering the out-of-pocket costs for certain ObamaCare enrollees — on a monthly basis. Now, insurers are still on the hook to offer the discounts, but won’t be getting reimbursed for it.

Source: Trump gambles with ObamaCare moves | TheHill

North Korea Revealed


Donald Trump is just the latest U.S. president in a long list of commanders-in-chief who have failed to find a way to deal with North Korea.

In the 1960’s and 1970’s, the central goal was preventing North Korean founder Kim Il Sung from redeploying his army south of the 38th parallel.

For the last 25 years, however, the focus of U.S. policymakers has been something even more difficult: the denuclearization of the Kim dynasty.

Source: North Korea Revealed

Daimler commits cash to help reshape company


Daimler, which has annual sales of 153 billion euros ($181 billion), said it did not plan to divest any of its divisions and no final decision on the legal split had been made.

Under the proposals, Daimler would be split into three independent stock corporations with their own management and supervisory boards capable of signing cross-shareholding agreements with any partners, a person familiar with the matter said, without giving more details.

Source: Daimler commits cash to help reshape company

Fake paperwork, poor parts challenge China’s aerospace boom


Supply firms have flocked to China’s booming aerospace sector, which is looking to supply parts faster and cheaper in a competitive global market. China’s exports of parts to the U.S. aerospace industry have trebled to $1.2 billion since 2009, U.S. trade data show.

The demand has fueled the rise of smaller makers of airplane parts in an industry that has been dominated by state-owned firms.

China’s aerospace industry isn’t just a supplier to foreign plane makers. Its airlines are among the biggest buyers of Boeing and Airbus (AIR.PA) planes, but China is now building its own passenger jets, flying its first narrow-body C919 plane in May.

Source: Fake paperwork, poor parts challenge China’s aerospace boom

The Passenger Economy: Challenges Ahead | Embedded Intel® Solutions


Once people cease to drive, what do they do? A new market will open up, called the “Passenger Economy,” a term coined by Intel® CEO Brian Krzanich.

Different applications, markets, and businesses can shoot out of this inflection point in how we carry out our lives. Consumer services such as entertainment, advertising, and personal or financial services might be carried out inside autonomous vehicles as people travel to work.

Intel’s Katherine (Kathy) Winter, Vice President and General Manager of the Automated Driving Division, deliberates a passenger economy and the new markets it will incite. “It’s probably the smaller piece right now, but mostly because we can’t imagine what it is yet,” she states. Winter suggests that this portion of the passenger economy would include “the new services that a person in an [autonomous] vehicle could be consuming; something [like] entertainment, education, advertising, things like that.”

Source: The Passenger Economy: Challenges Ahead | Embedded Intel® Solutions

We Don’t Need No Education: 3 Reasons Pink Floyd Had It Right | Ciena


Today, the half-life of a learned skill is reducing at a significant rate. According to John Seely Brown, co-author of the book, The New Culture of Learning, it stands at approximately 5 years. This means that much of what you learned 10 years ago is obsolete, and half of what you learned 5 years ago is irrelevant, no matter what industry you work in.

One of the reasons people fail to learn quickly is that they don’t build a solid enough foundation. They paralyze their progress by forcing themselves to move past concepts they haven’t yet mastered. If you can’t get an “A” grade in arithmetic, you shouldn’t progress to algebra — otherwise you’ll struggle trying to learn calculus.

Whether you need to jump start a job search, climb the ladder, or excel in your current role, it’s always a good idea to expand, hone, and refresh your skills. This is where Ciena can help.

I’m so excited to tell you about Ciena Learning’s new Discover Series, an entire library of free, self-paced learning courses for our industry.

Source: We Don’t Need No Education: 3 Reasons Pink Floyd Had It Right – Ciena

Changing Surveillance Challenges: How to Prepare | Embedded Intel® Solutions


With respect to surveillance solution integrators, these projections are deceptively low. Integrators face not only an increase in unit sales but also a rise in the performance levels each solution must support.

Surveillance industry trends point to IP-based communications replacing analog, an increasing number of surveillance streams feeding into network-based storage servers/appliances, and a rising number of cameras supporting ever higher resolution. Within the traffic surveillance market, increasing image resolution can be particularly critical, as cameras tend to be located a significant distance from passing vehicles.

Only higher resolution (backed by high-quality image sensors) will deliver the level of detail necessary to identify information such as license plate characters, car body damage, or driver facial features.

Higher image resolution requires higher video stream bandwidth and storage requirements.

Source: Changing Surveillance Challenges: How to Prepare | Embedded Intel® Solutions