The New Yorker’s Ninetieth: Cartoons from 1965 to 1975 | The New Yorker


“Why can’t those people leave peace to the experts?”

via The New Yorker’s Ninetieth: Cartoons from 1965 to 1975 – The New Yorker.

U.S. Banks Hoard $2 Trillion of Ultra-Safe Bonds | Bloomberg Business

U.S. commercial banks have increased their stakes in Treasuries and debt from federal agencies for 16 straight months, the longest stretch since 2003.

Together, they hold $2.1 trillion, the most according to Fed data going back to 1973.

via U.S. Banks Hoard $2 Trillion of Ultra-Safe Bonds – Bloomberg Business.

Who Won the Greek Showdown in Europe? | Bloomberg Business

“Nominally, at least, the creditors have won, but reality is likely to be different.”

via Who Won the Greek Showdown in Europe? – Bloomberg Business.

Press Bias Didn’t Get Giuliani | Bloomberg View


Most bias has to do with the industry’s norms (stories involving the president get more play than articles about governors, and so on).

In some cases, the self-interest of the media plays a role, whether it’s promoting freedom of the press, for example, or building up anyone who might take on Hillary Clinton for the Democratic presidential nomination as a way to build interest in that snooze fest.

via Press Bias Didn't Get Giuliani – Bloomberg View.

The Eurozone in Crisis | Council on Foreign Relations


Following World War II, France’s Jean Monnet, considered the founding father of modern Europe, argued that economic integration would be vital to eliminating intercontinental conflict.

In 1951, he became the chief architect of the European Coal and Steel Community, at the time the most significant step ever taken toward European integration.

via The Eurozone in Crisis – Council on Foreign Relations.

The Fear | neurope.eu


Ask why these reservations – or outright objections – are not raised in formal meetings, the answer, in private, in confidence and off the record is invariably the same,

“we are afraid of Germany.”

via The Fear | neurope.eu.

How much does it cost to watch a suspected militant? Lots.


Surveillance is a double-edged tool.

Catching terrorists is vital to protect the country. But we also want to live in a society where liberty and security are balanced, and the government does not follow people around without good reason.

From that perspective, the high cost and difficulty of maintaining a continuous surveillance on a suspect may not be entirely bad in a democracy.

via How much does it cost to watch a suspected militant? Lots..

US wants to hack your phone because it doesn’t have real spies it needs


Compromising encryption technology will do nothing to solve the intelligence community’s human-intelligence deficit.

Using the legislative process to force companies to make defective electronic devices with exploitable communications channels in the hope that they will catch a tiny number of potential or actual terrorists is a self-defeating strategy. If implemented, the FBI’s proposal would only make all Americans more vulnerable to malicious actors online and do nothing to stop the next terrorist attack.

via US wants to hack your phone because it doesn’t have real spies it needs.

More than measles: The threat to America’s ‘herd immunity’


This erosion to herd immunity reveals the public health nightmare that has arisen in recent years when vaccinations become politicized and then codified in the form of state-mandated, and rather loose, exemption laws.

via More than measles: The threat to America’s ‘herd immunity’.

Benjamin Netanyahu backers hint at consequences for Democrats who boycott speech | Washington Times


“There are certainly that many Democrats who aren’t worried about Jewish constituents, who aren’t worried about Christian Zionist constituents, who have no reason to fear electoral reprisal.”

“On the other hand, I’m going to say if you’re a representative from Long Island or South Carolina, you’d better be there.”

via Benjamin Netanyahu backers hint at consequences for Democrats who boycott speech – Washington Times.