Will Adding Free Wi-Fi to America’s National Parks Ruin Them? | Nextgov.com


What good is being immersed in nature without constant access to high-speed Internet?

While improving Wi-Fi coverage in Yellowstone might increase its popularity among young people, it could also deter visitors looking to unplug.

It might also give a boost to the cottage industry of “digital detox,” where places like Camp Grounded already charge adults hundreds of dollars to confiscate their devices for a weekend.

Yes, it’s a grim vision of the future: Wi-Fi-enabled campgrounds, and parks teeming with Snapchatting- and Instagramming-millennials …

Source: Will Adding Free Wi-Fi to America’s National Parks Ruin Them? – Nextgov.com

Moving beyond job growth | Brookings Institution


Our relaunched Metro Monitor can help these state and regional leaders keep their eye on the mix of metrics that matter.

My colleagues Chad Shearer, John Ng, Alan Berube, and Alec Friedhoff have developed a three-part set of indicators—growth, prosperity, and inclusion (including by race)—that capture broader goals for economic success.

Among other things, they find that economic growth alone, including rising numbers of jobs, does not necessarily yield more prosperous, inclusive communities.

Source: Moving beyond job growth | Brookings Institution

The Open University at 45: What can we learn from Britain’s distance education pioneer? | Brookings Institution


Dubbed “the University of the Air” when it was proposed by incoming Labor Prime Minister Harold Wilson in 1963, the OU (Open University) from the start was built on an interactive model rather than one-way transmission of knowledge.

Along with radio and TV lectures, often broadcast during late-night hours, the OU provided each student with a tutor who graded assignments and exams mailed back and forth (including, famously, self-contained science experiments.)

Periodic in-person meetings with tutors in regional centers and summer residential sessions were also available.

Source: The Open University at 45: What can we learn from Britain’s distance education pioneer? | Brookings Institution

Harvard Study: Criminals Aren’t Actually ‘Going Dark’ Using Encryption | Nextgov.com


The study argues that end-to-end encryption—the kind championed by Apple, whereby not even the company can access the data passing through its servers—is unlikely to be implemented on a broad scale as the Web is too “fragmented” and the vast majority of companies depend on access to user data to make money.

Source: Harvard Study: Criminals Aren’t Actually ‘Going Dark’ Using Encryption – Nextgov.com

German scientists to conduct nuclear fusion experiment | The Guardian


The experiment at the Max Planck Institute in Greifswald, north-east Germany, is part of a worldwide effort to harness nuclear fusion – a process in which atoms join at extremely high temperatures and release large amounts of energy.

Angela Merkel, the chancellor, who is a doctor of physics, is expected at Wednesday’s (Feb 3) event, which is happening in her constituency.

Source: German scientists to conduct nuclear fusion experiment | Environment | The Guardian

A Bad Feeling About Inequality | Bloomberg View


We might worry about inequality because an unequal society grows more slowly, or is more politically unfair or corrupt, or even is less healthy.

Source: A Bad Feeling About Inequality – Bloomberg View

Goldman Sachs Says It May Be Forced to Fundamentally Question How Capitalism Is Working | Bloomberg Business


.. In other words, profit margins should naturally mean-revert and oscillate.

The existence of fat margins should encourage new competitors and pricing cycles that cause those margins to erode; conversely, at the bottom of the cycle, low margins should lead to weaker players exiting the business and giving stronger companies more breathing space.

If that cycle doesn’t continue, something strange is taking place.

Needless to say, it’s not every day you see a major investment bank say it might have to start asking broader questions about capitalism itself.

Source: Goldman Sachs Says It May Be Forced to Fundamentally Question How Capitalism Is Working – Bloomberg Business

China to Plan Looser Limits on Foreign Fund Outflows | Bloomberg Business


The potential relaxation of repatriation rules stands in contrast with the authorities’ recent efforts to strengthen restrictions on capital flows as slowing economic growth and a depreciating currency led to a money exodus.

Outflows jumped to $1 trillion last year, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

Source: China to Plan Looser Limits on Foreign Fund Outflows – Bloomberg Business

How America Stacks Up: Economic Competitiveness and U.S. Policy | Council on Foreign Relations


How America Stacks Up: Economic Competitiveness and U.S. Policy, examines how the United States has responded to global economic competition and benchmarks the United States against other advanced economies.

The book is an invaluable resource in the 2016 presidential election cycle for assessing the Obama administration’s economic legacy and debating priorities for the next administration.

Clear infographic charts rate the United States against its competitors in eight areas: education, transportation, trade and investment, debt and deficits, worker retraining, corporate taxes, regulation, and innovation.

Source: Edward Alden and Rebecca Strauss: How America Stacks Up: Economic Competitiveness and U.S. Policy – Council on Foreign Relations

US opponents of the Trans-Pacific Partnership don’t understand how it works | Quartz


Obama has sold the TPP as key to stimulating US growth, creating American jobs and solidifying Washington’s leadership in the global economy. But some politicians aren’t buying it. Free-trade agreements (FTAs), they contend, cost Americans jobs, adding to the trials facing the middle class.

There is, however, something the TPP’s opponents don’t understand: the US jobs that have been lost to the developing world would have moved anyway, with or without free-trade pacts, so killing off the TPP won’t help American labor.

Source: US opponents of the Trans-Pacific Partnership don’t understand how it works – Quartz

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