House dress code debate reignites amid hot D.C. summer | TheHill


Three of the four hallways surrounding the House chamber feature no such dress code. But the Speaker’s Lobby, with its portraits of past Speakers and elaborate chandeliers, is considered a more formal setting meriting more formal clothes.

The specific rules for proper attire in the Speaker’s Lobby are not formally written anywhere. Then-Speaker Tip O’Neill (D-Mass.) announced in the 96th Congress that proper dress for members of the House meant a coat and tie for men and “appropriate attire” for women, CBS noted.

The House then adopted a resolution requiring members “to wear proper attire as determined by the Speaker.”

Source: House dress code debate reignites amid hot D.C. summer | TheHill

Trump tweets, tactics put China off-balance | TheHill


Trump initially seemed to think he could win over Xi with a mix of pressure and flattery. He challenged the Chinese leader with the possibility of tougher trade sanctions, but then wined and dined him in April at his Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida.

The effort was intended to win Chinese help on North Korea.

As Pyongyang has continued its missile tests, Trump has lashed out at China.

Source: Trump tweets, tactics put China off-balance | TheHill

Police remove thousands of migrants from northern Paris pavement camps | Reuters


They loaded 2,771 people, including dozens of unaccompanied children into vans and coaches at dawn, Interior Minister Gerard Collomb said, noting that the government was determined to prevent a proliferation of makeshift, illegal camps.

“These illegal camps present a security and public health risk for both the occupants and local residents,” the Paris police prefect’s office said in a statement as 350 police and other officials conducted the clear-out.

Source: Police remove thousands of migrants from northern Paris pavement camps | Reuters

Viewsroom: How China changed Hong Kong | Reuters


[Podcast] It’s 20 years since the British handed the island and adjacent territory back to the mainland. Breakingviews’ Asia columnists explain how Hong Kong’s economy and society have changed and ask whether this once-dominant regional financial center can regain some of its lost luster.

Source: Viewsroom: How China changed Hong Kong | Reuters

Buffett bets big on energy with $9 billion Oncor buy | Reuters


Berkshire said on Friday that its Berkshire Hathaway Energy unit will buy a reorganized Energy Future Holdings Corp to get access to Oncor Electric Delivery Co, Texas’ largest electricity transmission company.

The all-cash purchase reflects a bet by Buffett that he can do what two prior suitors could not: convince Texas regulators that a takeover is in the public interest and deserves approval.

Source: Buffett bets big on energy with $9 billion Oncor buy | Reuters

Trump administration sued by 18 U.S. states over student loan relief | Reuters


More than one-third of U.S. states on Thursday sued the U.S. Education Department and Secretary Betsy DeVos over the recent suspension of rules that would have swiftly canceled the student-loan debt of people defrauded by Corinthian Colleges Inc and other for-profit schools.

Massachusetts, 17 other states and the District of Columbia said in a filing in U.S. District Court in Washington, D.C. the department broke federal law in announcing the delay with limited public notice and opportunity to comment.

Source: Trump administration sued by 18 U.S. states over student loan relief | Reuters

U.S. seeks funds tied to North Korea from eight big banks | Reuters


Thursday’s filings show that Chief Judge Beryl Howell of the federal court in Washington, D.C. on May 22 granted U.S. prosecutors’ applications for “damming” seizure warrants against Bank of America Corp, Bank of New York Mellon Corp, Citigroup Inc, Deutsche Bank AG, HSBC Holdings Plc, JPMorgan Chase & Co, Standard Chartered Plc and Wells Fargo & Co.

Prosecutors believe the banks have processed more than $700 million of “prohibited” transactions on behalf of entities tied to North Korea since 2009, including the period after Donald Trump was elected U.S. president, the filings show.

Source: U.S. seeks funds tied to North Korea from eight big banks | Reuters

U.S. bombers challenge China in South China Sea flyover | Reuters


The United States has criticized China’s build-up of military facilities on South China Sea reefs and tiny islands it has constructed, concerned that they could be used to extend its strategic reach.

Brunei, Malaysia, the Philippines, Vietnam and Taiwan also have claims in the sea, through which about $5 trillion in ship-borne trade passes each year.

The two Lancers that made the flight had earlier trained with Japanese jet fighters in the neighboring East China Sea, the first time the two forces had conducted joint night-time drills.

Source: U.S. bombers challenge China in South China Sea flyover | Reuters

Toshiba under pressure to consider ‘Plan B’ as chip sale falters: sources | Reuters


Those people say Toshiba’s leadership is sticking to Plan A: selling the world’s second-largest memory chip maker to a Japanese government-backed group that also includes Bain Capital.

But the clock is ticking for Toshiba, which was still recovering from a $1.3 billion accounting scandal in 2015 when it was hit by billions of dollars of cost overruns at its U.S. nuclear unit Westinghouse in December.

Unless it closes a deal by March, a gaping balance-sheet hole will prompt automatic delisting of its shares from Tokyo’s stock market – further battering its shareholders.

As questions emerge around the role of South Korean rival SK Hynix in the preferred bidder group, some Toshiba executives and officials at the company’s main creditor banks say they want top management to look at other options.

Source: Toshiba under pressure to consider ‘Plan B’ as chip sale falters: sources | Reuters

No ‘Trump Bump’ in Economic Growth | Pacific Standard

This comes after a disappointing first quarter of 2017—the first economic quarter of Donald Trump’s presidency—that showed only 1.4 percent growth, in sharp contrast to the White House’s promises.

Throughout the campaign, and upon taking office, Trump promised that his policies would result in 4 percent gross domestic product growth.

Source: No ‘Trump Bump’ in Economic Growth – Pacific Standard