Hurricane Harvey Shows What Climate Disruption-Amplified Flooding Can Do

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What made Harvey so brutal?

Scientific studies have shown for quite some time that Anthropogenic Climate Disruption (ACD) amplifies the impacts of hurricanes by causing them to have larger storm surges, higher wind speeds and greater rainfall amounts. All of these are driven by the amount of heat in the oceans.

According to a study by Ars Technica, this past winter, for the first time on record, water temperatures in the Gulf of Mexico never fell below 73°F.

These conditions set the stage for what we are witnessing now: Warming waters intensify the strength and impacts of tropical storms and hurricanes, as previous studies have shown.

Additionally, the water temperatures in the Gulf of Mexico this summer have been exceedingly warm, creating the prime conditions for a storm like Harvey.

ACD is amping up hurricanes.

Source: Hurricane Harvey Shows What Climate Disruption-Amplified Flooding Can Do

Verizon, Google Error Causes Internet Crashes In Japan | Androidheadlines.com


Google and Verizon jointly committed on Friday that caused internet connections throughout Japan to slow to a crawl and, in many cases, go out entirely.

The somewhat simple issue boiled down to a misconfiguration of Google’s border gateway protocol (BGP) that was not caught by Verizon, who most of the traffic ended up going through.

This, in turn, caused a leak of sorts. Essentially, a number of Google IP addresses were advertised as free for internet traffic, and thus had traffic routed to them by local and foreign service providers, so long as the traffic was meant for Japan.

Not only were Google’s servers not equipped to forward traffic, but they could not handle the collective strain meant for all combined service providers in Japan.

Google rooted out the issue and corrected it within minutes, but getting the traffic flowing correctly again resulted in hours of slow internet throughout the nation.

Source: Verizon, Google Error Causes Internet Crashes In Japan | Androidheadlines.com

Why Verizon Had To Rethink Its Unlimited Strategy

While Verizon hasn’t really been a proponent of unlimited plans (it was one of the first carriers to shift to tiered offerings), it launched an unlimited offering priced at $80 this February, bowing to competitive pressure from T-Mobile and Sprint.

The plan saw strong uptake, helping the carrier add 358k postpaid phone subscribers over the second quarter. However, it appears that the plan, which offered full HD video streaming (1080p), caused network congestion, degrading Verizon’s network performance.

A report from Ookla indicated that data speeds on Verizon slowed by 14% since it re-launched unlimited data.

Moreover, with unlimited plans, data consumption keeps increasing, calling for more capacity. However, revenues and cash flows are capped, as these plans don’t have any overage fees, putting pressure on a carriers’ network investment plans.

Source: Why Verizon Had To Rethink Its Unlimited Strategy

Renewable energy at cost: how Pure Planet plans to shake up the UK energy market | Power Technology


Pure Planet customers pay no more than the firm pays for wholesale energy. A nominal monthly membership fee of £10 per fuel, which includes the standing charge, covers the company’s margin.

“The British market is massively driven by trust and price, so the idea of having an honest, transparent tariff is compelling,” explains Steven Day.

“That is why we offer a standing charge packaged into a monthly fee,” he says, continuing, “The idea comes from the mobile world with Telco where monthly subscription fees are relatively common and people understand that the deal buys them a package of monthly services.

Source: Renewable energy at cost: how Pure Planet plans to shake up the UK energy market – Power Technology

Minneapolis shoots for 100 percent renewable energy in five years | City Pages


Minneapolis currently gets about 18 percent of its electricity from renewable sources. Far from satisfied, officials believe the city could step that up to 100 percent in just five years—while drastically reducing demand at the same time.

The city uses about 100 million kilowatt hours of electricity each year, costing taxpayers about $11 million to $12 million to keep government properties running.

The two biggest consumers are sewage and street lights, which together comprise nearly 70 percent of the city’s bill.

Source: Minneapolis shoots for 100 percent renewable energy in five years | City Pages

Delhiites cold to solar energy, govt’s push for renewable power hits a wall | Hindustan Times

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After the Delhi Solar Policy was notified in 2016, the city government had set a target of generating 84MW of solar power only through rooftops in residences by March 2018.

A year has passed since then, but households are contributing only around 15 MW in Delhi’s total solar power production of 56 MW.

The government has set a target of generating a total of 186 MW (84MW on residential and private buildings and 102 MW on government buildings) of solar power by March 2018.

This is a revised target as the Delhi Solar Policy mandated achieving this target by December 2017. The same has to be increased to 1,000 MW by 2020 and 2,000 MW by 2025.

Source: Delhiites cold to solar energy, govt’s push for renewable power hits a wall | delhi news | Hindustan Times

Australia Produces Enough Renewable Energy to Power 70% of Homes


According to a new report, Australia’s renewable energy sector produced enough power to supply electricity to 70 percent of the country’s homes last year.

Once the 46 large-scale projects in the works are completed, that number should increase to 90 percent.

Source: Australia Produces Enough Renewable Energy to Power 70% of Homes

Expose: AT&T California Fiber Optic Scandal: Billions Charged for Broadband that Never Showed Up. | HuffPost


California was supposed to be a fiber optic state, starting in 1996, as was pointed out in the Pacific Telesis (now AT&T California) 1994 Investor Fact Book.

Instead, customers paid billions upon billions extra, including low income families, seniors, small businesses and everyone else, as these promises of a broadband-internet–cable competition future were used over and over to raise rates and get tax perks – and then never showed up.

There have been three major waves of false claims to get rate increases and deregulation, and a host of other plays including merger conditions, the “IP Transition”, and rural government broadband funding, among others, and these happened on both the state and federal level.

Source: Expose: AT&T California Fiber Optic Scandal: Billions Charged for Broadband that Never Showed Up. | HuffPost

How Hurricane Harvey Is Affecting Customers of Comcast, AT&T and Charter | TheStreet


The storm had knocked out more than 280,000 cable and wireline telecom hookups in Texas and Louisiana by Tuesday afternoon, the Federal Communications Commission reported. The count is up significantly since Monday, when the government reported that nearly 190,000 cable and wireline customers were out of service.

Close to 5% of cell sites were out of service throughout the 55 counties in the disaster area. The coastal Texas areas just northeast of Corpus Christi were hit especially hard, however. In Aransas and Refugio counties, the FCC noted that 84.2% and 73.1% of cell sites, respectively, were out on Tuesday. Coverage has improved since Monday, when Aransas and Refugio counties had outage rates of 94.7% and 84.6%.

Source: How Hurricane Harvey Is Affecting Customers of Comcast, AT&T and Charter – TheStreet

From laid off to Lockheed in 2 weeks: Why manufacturers in Texas are snapping up job seekers | Dallas News


On Tuesday, Michael Lawrence, a clean-cut 25-year-old without a college degree, walked out of a hotel in downtown Fort Worth with a letter of intent for a job at Lockheed Martin.

“I didn’t wait in a single line,” he said with a sheepish grin.

This is an example of a shifting reality for Texas’ high-tech manufacturers: They’re in a candidate’s market with a widening gap between new jobs and people with the right skills to fill them.

Source: From laid off to Lockheed in 2 weeks: Why manufacturers in Texas are snapping up job seekers | Jobs | Dallas News