Nazis Feeling Neglected After Republicans’ Embrace of Child Molesters | The New Yorker


After the Republican National Committee agreed to fund the alleged child molester Roy Moore’s campaign for the United States Senate, aggrieved Nazis called the move a blatant attempt to pander to the child-molester vote.

In Washington, the Senate Majority Leader, Mitch McConnell, said that the battle between Nazis and child molesters for control of the Republican Party was largely an invention of the media.

“The Republican Party in 2017 is a place where both Nazis and child molesters can feel at home,” McConnell said.

Source: Nazis Feeling Neglected After Republicans’ Embrace of Child Molesters | The New Yorker

December 3, 2017 – Most-Viewed Bills | Congress.gov

December 3, 2017

1. H.R.1 [115th] Tax Cuts and Jobs Act
2. H.R.38 [115th] Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act of 2017
3. H.R.2810 [115th] National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018
4. S.Amdt.1618 [115th] S.Amdt.1618 to H.R.1
5. S.1804 [115th] Medicare for All Act of 2017
6. H.R.3004 [115th] Kate’s Law
7. H.R.367 [115th] Hearing Protection Act of 2017
8. H.R.392 [115th] Fairness for High-Skilled Immigrants Act of 2017
9. H.R.3905 [115th] Minnesota’s Economic Rights in the Superior National Forest Act
10. S.1615 [115th] Dream Act of 2017

Source: Most-Viewed Bills – Congress.gov Resources –

In mortgage fraud frenzy, China’s banks face a hidden danger


Gravity-defying property prices in China have spawned widespread home-loan fraud as buyers fear missing out on what seems like a sure bet. Real estate agents, valuation companies and banks themselves are party to the scam.

“When everyone is doing it, you can’t put everyone in jail,” says Hu Weigang, who specializes in real estate litigation.

While property prices in China continue to rise, mortgage fraud remains largely a hidden danger, much as subprime loans in the United States remained mostly out of sight ahead of the 2008 global financial crisis. The fear is that in a property correction, fraudulent mortgages would unravel, accelerating a collapse of housing prices in the world’s second biggest economy. This, in turn, would imperil China’s debt-laden financial system.

The danger from gravity-defying home prices is clear to the ruling Communist Party. In his marathon speech at the 19th Party Congress in October, Chinese President Xi Jinping warned about the overheated property market. “Houses are built to be lived in, not for speculation,” he said.

Top bank officials are also worried.

Source: In mortgage fraud frenzy, China’s banks face a hidden danger

Bitcoin investors hoping to make billions may end up with a sack of fool’s gold | The Guardian


Relatively few people have managed to decipher the codes needed to extract bitcoins from the 21 million locked inside the mathematical problems set by its creator, the software engineer whose true identity is unknown but who goes by the name Satoshi Nakamoto.

Those who have employed enough computer power and code-cracking know-how can consider themselves rich now that the value of one bitcoin has soared from $753 last December to around $10,000. The rest have deployed huge amounts of energy and time for no return.

And with mainstream financial exchanges looking to host bitcoin as a trade-able asset, or list derivatives of bitcoin on their trading boards, thousands more will be sucked in over the next 18 months.

Where ordinary investors, hunting in large numbers, seek a return on their savings in a high-risk environment, governments are usually minded to regulate.

Source: Bitcoin investors hoping to make billions may end up with a sack of fool’s gold | Technology | The Guardian

Financial markets could be over-heating, warns central bank body | The Guardian


Investors are ignoring warning signs that financial markets could be overheating and consumer debts are rising to unsustainable levels, the global body for central banks has warned in its quarterly financial health check.

The Bank for International Settlements (BIS) said the situation in the global economy was similar to the pre-2008 crash era when investors, seeking high returns, borrowed heavily to invest in risky assets, despite moves by central banks to tighten access to credit.

The BIS, known as the central bankers’ bank, said attempts by the US Federal Reserve and the Bank of England to choke off risky behavior by raising interest rates had failed so far and unstable financial bubbles were continuing to grow.

Source: Financial markets could be over-heating, warns central bank body | Business | The Guardian

There is no military option to take out North Korean nuclear program | TheHill


The Trump administration is setting up binary options when so many more exist.

There are smart and prudent steps, such as increasing our ballistic missile capabilities and offering North Korea a diplomatic path to back down, essential to easing tensions. We must, once again, recognize basic facts that seem to get forgotten each time there is another flareup.

First, North Korea will not be sanctioned into submission.

The United Nations imposed nine rounds of sanctions against it since 2006. Sanctions devastate the North Korean people, but not its elite who make decisions.

North Korea did not make real concessions in the 1990s even in the face of famine and biting sanctions that killed a tenth of the population. Keep squeezing North Korean elite, but be under no illusion it will compel real change.

Source: There is no military option to take out North Korean nuclear program | TheHill

FCC’s net neutrality repeal sparks backlash | TheHill


The plan was met with instant backlash from net neutrality supporters, who have been rallying to save the rules for the better part of a year.

As of Sunday afternoon, at least 750,000 people have called Congress since Pai announced his plan, according to battleforthenet.com.

And activists are planning hundreds of demonstrations at Verizon stores — Pai was associate general counsel at the telecom giant from 2001 to 2003 — and congressional offices across the country next week in protest of the planned vote.

Source: FCC’s net neutrality repeal sparks backlash | TheHill

The GOP has divided America | TheHill


At this hellish moment when the president is threatening to drag the country beyond chaos, why are congressional Republicans failing to restrain the Republican in the White House?

Some Republicans cower in fear of Trump’s supporters but a surprising number are just quitting Congress.

As of last week, 44 members of the House of Representatives and two members of the Senate have announced that they will retire, resign, or run for another office by the end of the 115th Congress.

Thirty of the 44 heading for the door are Republicans.

Source: Juan Williams: The GOP has divided America | TheHill

UK pushing to include Bitcoin under money-laundering rules


Britain wants to increase regulation of Bitcoin and other digital currencies by expanding the reach of European Union anti-money-laundering rules that force traders to disclose their identities and report suspicious activity.

With demand for Bitcoin surging, fueling a 1,000 percent rally in its value so far this year, the British finance ministry said it expected negotiations over changes to the EU rules would conclude later this year or in early 2018.

Source: UK pushing to include Bitcoin under money-laundering rules

Broadcom launches 11-nominee slate for Qualcomm board


Chipmaker Broadcom Ltd (AVGO.O) made its first formal move toward a hostile bid to take over Qualcomm Inc (QCOM.O) on Monday, laying out a slate of 11 nominees it wants to put on the board of the U.S. semiconductor firm.

Qualcomm last month rejected Broadcom’s $103 billion cash-and-stock bid, saying it dramatically undervalued the company, a line it repeated in Monday’s statement.

Shareholders will be able to vote for or against the Broadcom nominees at an annual meeting on March 6.

Source: Broadcom launches 11-nominee slate for Qualcomm board