Bitcoin and cryptocurrencies ‘will come to bad end’, says Warren Buffett | The Guardian


“I can say almost with certainty that cryptocurrencies will come to a bad end,” Buffett told CNBC in an interview.

Buffett’s comments were backed by Charlie Munger, his longtime partner at his investment company Berkshire Hathaway, who described the soaring values of Bitcoin and the other cryptocurrencies as “bubbles”.

Munger said investors “are excited because things are going up at the moment and it sounds vaguely modern. But I’m not excited.”

Source: Bitcoin and cryptocurrencies ‘will come to bad end’, says Warren Buffett | Technology | The Guardian

Democrats go it alone on Russia probe after partisan breakdowns | The Washington Post


Democrats are striking out on their own this week over all but one of the congressional investigations into Russian meddling, independently releasing reports and transcripts, and attacking Republicans they accuse of intentionally undermining active probes in deference to President Trump.

Throughout the Capitol, partisan divisions have engulfed the Russia investigations, transforming what were supposed to be nonpartisan probes into political flamethrowing competitions, as each side accuses the other of going rogue. And lawmakers on both sides of the aisle are bracing for the partisan sniping to worsen.

Source: Democrats go it alone on Russia probe after partisan breakdowns – The Washington Post

Get ready for unprecedented number of cybersecurity threats in the coming year | TheHill


The total number of data records lost or stolen since 2013 is 9.19 billion and counting. Drilling deeper, we experience approximately five million records lost every day, or 59 records every second.

These incredibly threatening statistics have been on an upward trend year after year. They serve as validation of the worrisome threat landscape organizations endure. While these numbers alone act as a strong driver to improve cybersecurity posture, compliance requirements compound this by presenting looming consequences for entities with poor cybersecurity practices.

Source: Get ready for unprecedented number of cybersecurity threats in the coming year | TheHill

Banks rack up big wins in Trump’s Washington | TheHill


The banks are reeling in record profits, thanks to the growing economy and the booming stock market, the just-passed Republican tax-overhaul bill has slashed their tax rate and to top it all off, a bipartisan Senate coalition is fighting to loosen the post-crisis rules meant to curb risky behavior in the financial industry.

Critics of the banking sector say the shift is the result of Wall Street seizing control of the government; they compare President Trump’s appointments to a Wall Street occupation of the federal government.

Source: Banks rack up big wins in Trump’s Washington | TheHill

House headed for cliffhanger vote on NSA surveillance | TheHill


The House is set to vote on Thursday on a controversial renewal of the National Security Agency’s (NSA) warrantless surveillance program — a vote that could give privacy advocates an unexpected victory.

If the legislation passes in its current form, the Senate is expected to quickly take it up before the law authorizing the program expires on Jan. 19.

But the House is also expected to vote on a bipartisan amendment imposing a series of restrictions on the program designed to protect Americans who are swept up in government spying on foreigners overseas.

Source: House headed for cliffhanger vote on NSA surveillance | TheHill

Congress barrels toward another shutdown crisis | TheHill


Lawmakers are scrambling to avoid a government shutdown as they barrel toward another funding deadline without a clear path forward.

They are expected to offer a short-term stopgap measure given the fast-approaching deadline and a failure to lockdown a deal on raising spending ceilings for defense and nondefense.

Source: Congress barrels toward another shutdown crisis | TheHill

South Korea plans to ban cryptocurrency trading, rattles market


South Korea’s government said on Thursday it plans to ban cryptocurrency trading, sending bitcoin prices plummeting and throwing the virtual coin market into turmoil as the nation’s police and tax authorities raided local exchanges on alleged tax evasion.

The clampdown in South Korea, a crucial source of global demand for cryptocurrency, came as policymakers around the world struggled to regulate an asset whose value has skyrocketed over the last year.

Source: South Korea plans to ban cryptocurrency trading, rattles market

How the courts help companies keep sexual misconduct under cover


Most civil cases settle before they can be publicly aired before a jury. That means the pre-trial secrecy allows companies to permanently conceal information about their sexual harassment policies and how they respond to specific complaints of abuse.

A broad protective order in the ongoing lawsuit by Chen-Oster and three other women against Goldman has allowed the Wall Street giant to keep hundreds of documents under wraps for three years.

The protective order permitted lawyers on either side to mark any document exchanged in discovery as confidential, thus barring anyone from disclosing it outside the case. Such orders have become standard to ensure secrecy during the pre-trial evidence discovery phase in U.S. civil litigation.

Source: How the courts help companies keep sexual misconduct under cover

Canada increasingly convinced Trump will pull out of NAFTA

Royal Bank of Canada’s Chief Executive Dave McKay said on Tuesday he believed there was now a greater chance that NAFTA could be scrapped.

“The government is increasingly sure about this … it is now planning for Trump to announce a withdrawal,” one of the sources, who asked to remain anonymous because of the sensitivity of the situation, said.

Source: Exclusive: Canada increasingly convinced Trump will pull out of NAFTA

Mexico will leave NAFTA talks if Trump triggers process to withdraw


“I think it’s indisputable that if Trump announces a U.S. withdrawal from NAFTA, well at that moment the negotiations stop,” said Raul Urteaga, head of international trade for Mexico’s agriculture ministry.

The two other sources, who are involved in the trade talks and asked not to be named, said that Mexico remains firm on its position to get up and leave from the negotiating table if Trump goes through with the move.

Source: Mexico will leave NAFTA talks if Trump triggers process to withdraw