The Digital Citizen Summit Livestream


Digital services are here for the long-haul, and the federal government must act fast to keep pace.

What’s the checklist government must follow to ensure a digital-first organization and better serve the citizen?

Join Government Executive for our 2018 Digital Citizen Summit Livestream to hear from leaders who have transformed the way their services are designed, delivered, and perceived, all with an eye towards championing their customers — the citizens who use their services everyday.

When: Jan 31 2018, 8:30-11:30am (EST), 01:30 pm (UTC)
Where: Online

Source: The Digital Citizen Summit Livestream

Bitcoin’s real story isn’t the rampant speculation, but its untold potential | TheHill


.. digital money rose up in response to the poor way that governments have managed their currencies in the last 40 years.

Despite its ups and downs, the dollar has steadily lost value since it cut its link to gold in 1971.

The abysmal way countries have treated their currencies has literally cost the global economy trillions in lost growth — unstable money hurts productive, long-term investment and encourages nanosecond speculation, especially in currencies, whose daily trading volume exceeds $5 trillion.

Source: Bitcoin’s real story isn’t the rampant speculation, but its untold potential | TheHill

Shutdown drama grips the Capitol | TheHill


House Republican leaders are within striking distance of securing enough GOP votes to pass a stopgap spending bill to prevent a government shutdown, which would shift the funding fight to the Senate.

But they aren’t out of the woods just yet. Many members of the House Freedom Caucus are vowing to oppose the spending measure unless leadership commits to putting a conservative immigration bill on the floor and boosting defense spending, which could make Thursday’s floor vote on the continuing resolution (CR) a nail-biter.

Source: Shutdown drama grips the Capitol | TheHill

GOP sees omens of a Dem wave in Wisconsin | TheHill


A surprise loss in a special statehouse election Tuesday night in Wisconsin has set off a new round of alarm among Republicans worried that they could face a Democratic wave in this year’s midterm elections.

Source: GOP sees omens of a Dem wave in Wisconsin | TheHill

The best way for the FCC to enable a 5G future


The Wow Factor obscures the obstacles. Rollout for 5G depends on access to bandwidth. And here the ghost of Herbert Hoover stands tall. His legislative brainchild, the Radio Act of 1927, sandbags innovation by defining spectrum uses upfront, prior to authorization.

That we are even talking about 5G – let alone 1G, 2G, 3G or 4G – reveals that Hooverian public policy is possible to overcome. But it takes a while. First generation cellular was touted by the U.S. Federal Communications Commission in 1945, but licenses were not issued until 1984-89.

Under the Radio Act, each slice of the airwaves must be allocated according to “public interest, convenience or necessity,” a bureaucracy-enforcing meme that is a devil’s playground for insiders.

Key players include incumbents opposed to competing inventions as well as corporate counsel billing for slow rolls by the hour.

Source: Commentary: The best way for the FCC to enable a 5G future

Emirates hands Airbus A380 superjumbo a lifeline with $16 billion order


The European planemaker said Emirates [EMIRA.UL] had placed a provisional order for 20 of the double-decker superjumbos, with an option for 16 more. Deliveries are due to start in 2020.

The agreement hands a lifeline to the slow-selling aircraft, in service for just 10 years, and rescues one of Europe’s most visible industrial symbols overseas.

The deal ends months of tough-fought negotiations. Talks between Airbus and Emirates about a fresh A380 order broke down at the last minute at the Dubai Airshow in November, when the Gulf carrier placed an order for 40 smaller Boeing (BA.N) 787s.

Source: Emirates hands Airbus A380 superjumbo a lifeline with $16 billion order

Intel: Problem in patches for Spectre, Meltdown extends to newer chips


Intel confirmed that patches for the security flaws can cause higher-than-expected reboot rates in Ivy Bridge, Sandy Bridge, Skylake and Kaby Lake processors, said Navin Shenoy, general manager of the data center group, in a statement on Intel’s website.

The Kaby Lake chips are the company’s most recent offering.

Source: Intel: Problem in patches for Spectre, Meltdown extends to newer chips

Tim Cook goes as American as Apple’s pie


Whether $30 billion in U.S. capital expenditure represents an increase is unclear given that the company doesn’t give a regional breakdown.

Overall capex was $10.7 billion in the financial year ended September 2017, and Apple projects an increase to $16 billion in the current year. Some 61 percent of the company’s long-lived assets are in the United States, according to its latest annual report. In that proportion, a hefty $10 billion would be spent stateside this year alone.

In any event, with over $200 billion of cash no longer trapped offshore, Cook will also have plenty of scope to increase dividends or buy back more shares.

Source: Breakingviews – Tim Cook goes as American as Apple’s pie

Apple plans new U.S. campus, to pay $38 billion in foreign cash taxes


Between the spending plan, hiring 20,000 people, tax payments and business with U.S.-based suppliers, Apple on Wednesday estimated it would spend $350 billion in the United States over the next five years.

It did not, however, say how much of the plan was new or how much of its $252.3 billion in cash abroad – the largest of any U.S. corporation – it would bring home. In addition to the $38 billion in taxes it must pay, Apple has run up $97 billion in U.S.-issued debt to pay for previous share buybacks and dividends.

Source: Apple plans new U.S. campus, to pay $38 billion in foreign cash taxes

How Reuters breaks news by mobile alerts


The false alert landed on mobile phones across the state’s islands and led to nearly an hour of panic and confusion before it was corrected.

In our connected world, alerts sent directly to people’s phones or computers are part of everyday life. For news publishers, alerts are a major competitive battleground, presenting an opportunity to be first to break news, but Reuters did not publish the Hawaii alert, after realizing it was sent in error by an employee.

Source: How Reuters breaks news by mobile alerts