BRIDGE SF 2018


BridgeSF is a highly interactive conference that will bridge the gap between the public and private sectors in the growing GovTech field by bringing together cities, startups, academia, enterprise companies, VCs and media from around the world.

When: May 22-24, 2018
Where: San Francisco

Source: BRIDGE SF 2018

Internet of Things Developers Conference


The Internet of Things Developers Conference (IoT DevCon) is designed specifically for IoT product developers and managers and decision-makers. The two-day focused conference delivers top industry keynote speakers, technical sessions and panel discussions from domain-specific to general techniques.

You will meet and hear from industry leading influencers as they present authoritative and trending perspectives on how the IoT will affect business and product development, and a look into the future of what IoT will bring.

When: June 5-6, 2018
Where: Santa Clara, CA

Source: Internet of Things Developers Conference – Resolving the Technical and Business Challenges of Getting Connected to Internet of Things

The Remaking of Global Finance | YouTube

From the unbridled growth of cryptocurrencies to the potential decline of the dollar as the world’s reserve currency, the international financial system is undergoing a deep transformation.

How should business leaders and policy-makers prepare for the remaking of global finance?

Source: The Remaking of Global Finance | YouTube

Government shutdowns are the dysfunction of new Senate norm | TheHill


Today’s Senate is so dysfunctional that just getting to normal operating procedure — considering bills, offering amendments, and voting — has gone from baseline to brass ring.

The “world’s greatest deliberative body” no longer deliberates. Nor does it do much of anything.

The Senate works 2.5 days a week, spending its days locked in endless quorum calls while major bills are largely crafted by the leadership without the input of other senators.

Once they come to the floor, no amendments are allowed and cloture is filed immediately, limiting debate to a maximum of 30 hours.

It wasn’t always this way.

Source: Government shutdowns are the dysfunction of new Senate norm | TheHill

Parading the American character | TheHill


America is not a martial nation. It has vast military might and fights with resolve and ferocity when need be. But it is not a nation whose soul is in arms, such as is the heritage of Europe, with its centuries of often wasteful and inconclusive wars. (Does that sound disturbingly familiar to the contemporary American reader assured by generals and presidents that each day brings us closer to victory?)

Source: Parading the American character | TheHill

Right revolts on budget deal | TheHill


The swift backlash from fiscal hawks means that Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) and his leadership team will need dozens of Democratic votes to help get the caps-and-funding deal through the lower chamber to avert a government shutdown set for midnight Thursday.

Source: Right revolts on budget deal | TheHill

Antagonists Days Ago, McConnell and Schumer Find Common Cause | The New York Times


The agreement, the subject of intense private negotiations between Mr. McConnell, Republican of Kentucky, and Mr. Schumer, Democrat of New York, had been percolating for days. They consulted with Speaker Paul D. Ryan of Wisconsin and Representative Nancy Pelosi of California, the Democratic leader, but the White House, by design, did not play a big role in the talks.

Mr. Schumer gleefully pointed out that fact on the floor by noting that the deal “was completed without a great deal of help from the White House.”

Source: Antagonists Days Ago, McConnell and Schumer Find Common Cause – The New York Times

Senate leaders’ budget deal faces opposition in both parties


The measure was a win for Republican allies of the Pentagon and for Democrats seeking more for infrastructure projects and combating opioid abuse.

But it represented a bitter defeat for many liberal Democrats who sought to use the party’s leverage on the budget to resolve the plight of immigrant “Dreamers” who face deportation after being brought to the U.S. illegally as children. The deal does not address immigration. And some tea party Republicans shredded the measure as a budget-buster.

Source: Senate leaders’ budget deal faces opposition in both parties

American universities are losing international students


In the short run, losing international students is bad for what some might think of as a pretty crass reason: International students subsidize American kids because nonresidents pay higher tuition and receive less financial aid.

This is especially true at public universities. For example, at the University of California—which is the world’s largest research university system—Californians pay about $14,000 in tuition and fees. International students pay more like $41,000—that’s roughly triple.

And about a third of tuition is turned around and spent on financial aid, but almost none of that goes to international students. So the effective price difference is even bigger than list price would indicate.

Source: Sealing the border redux: American universities are losing international students

Feds warn on ransomware threat to schools | FCW


Hackers have tried to sell over 100 million private records extorted from almost 100 schools and businesses as of the end of last year after escalating, sometimes violent, threats, according to an industry warning issued Jan. 31 by the FBI and the Department of Education inspector general.

Source: Feds warn on ransomware threat to schools — FCW