Millions of Americans Demand $130,000 for Not Having Sex with Trump | The New Yorker


“Don’t get me wrong, I’m happy for Stormy Daniels,” Tracy Klugian, a florist in Santa Rosa, California, said. “I just want my check, too.”

Source: Millions of Americans Demand $130,000 for Not Having Sex with Trump | The New Yorker

Democrat wins legislative seat in Florida as once-sleepy state races heat up in Trump era | The Washington Post


Both parties are pumping money into low-turnout races; both freely admit that they are becoming referendums on the president.

The risks in Florida were clear long before the results came in.

.. for years, Democrats had been spending little, and losing more — nearly 1,000 state legislative seats, many gerrymandered further out of reach after the party was routed in 2010.

Starting last year, they’ve seen money and volunteers flood the sort of local races where the party had been wiped out during Barack Obama’s presidency.

Source: Democrat wins legislative seat in Florida as once-sleepy state races heat up in Trump era – The Washington Post

GOP women frustrated by Trump’s approach to abuse charges


Jennifer Horn, former New Hampshire Republican chairwoman, added, “Every single time the president tries to excuse a man who has assaulted women, it makes it harder and harder for our candidates to run credible campaigns.”

Source: GOP women frustrated by Trump’s approach to abuse charges

White House plays defense after FBI testimony | TheHill


In testimony on Capitol Hill, FBI Director Christopher Wray said the FBI delivered its first report on Porter to the White House in March 2017, months before officials said they first learned about problems during his background check for a security clearance.

Source: White House plays defense after FBI testimony | TheHill

Senate hits wall on immigration | TheHill


The Senate’s immigration debate is hitting a wall before it even gets started.

Democrats blocked Republicans from setting up votes on Tuesday, while GOP senators themselves outlined different approaches for how to build a compromise that could get 60 votes — the supermajority required to overcome a filibuster and clear legislation from the Senate.

Source: Senate hits wall on immigration | TheHill

After bribery allegations, Netanyahu’s government stable – for now


Police on Tuesday said they had found sufficient evidence for the 68-year-old Netanyahu to be charged with bribery in two separate cases, presenting him with one of the biggest challenges to his long dominance of Israeli politics.

Source: After bribery allegations, Netanyahu’s government stable – for now

Israeli tech firm undercuts facial recognition to bolster privacy


The startup, called D-ID, says it has developed a “firewall” to block facial recognition, the ubiquitous technology that can now unlock smartphones, tag friends on Facebook, or help police pick out an individual hiding in a crowd.

The problem is that with facial recognition on the rise, hackers have a new target: huge reservoirs of profile pictures linked to personal information.

Source: Israeli tech firm undercuts facial recognition to bolster privacy

The Trump Effect | Immigration


Currently, there are more than 200 facilities in the United States where U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) detain illegal immigrants, most of them located in states that border Mexico.

Trump has ordered more of these facilities be built and increasing the number of detention beds to house more illegal immigrants.

The executive order also called for promptly deporting illegal immigrants after their apprehension, and keeping them in custody until that can be arranged.

Source: The Trump Effect | Immigration

Ex-CIA analysts explain why a bloody nose policy on North Korea would backfire


Recently the administration withdrew Victor Cha’s nomination to be ambassador to South Korea, reportedly because of his objection to a “bloody nose” strike.

Despite appearances at the Olympics, we are now closer to a war on the Korean Peninsula than at any time since 1994, when the Clinton administration considered a military strike to destroy North Korea’s Yongbyon nuclear complex.

Source: Ex-CIA analysts explain why a bloody nose policy on North Korea would backfire

New CLOUD Act splits industry, civil liberty orgs | FCW


A revamped bill that seeks to clarify the conditions under which U.S. law enforcement can legally access data owned by domestic companies but stored overseas is causing a rift in the uneasy alliance that has formed between tech giants and data privacy advocates.

The legislation is in large part an attempt to resolve lingering legal questions around a major case pending before the Supreme Court, Microsoft Corp. v. United States.

At its heart, the case deals with whether the provisions of the 1986 Electronic Communications Privacy Act that allow the government to compel disclosure of wire and electronic communications are subject to geographical and territorial limitations.

Source: New CLOUD Act splits industry, civil liberty orgs — FCW