Final splice on completed on Hawaiki cable


Hawaiki Submarine Cable and TE SubCom have made the final splice of the $350m Hawaiki Submarine Cable, connecting Australia, New Zealand and Hawaii to the US mainland.

With the final splice now made and all cable installations completed, final testing is set to begin on the 15,000km cable ahead of a service launch date in June, 2018.

Hawaiki cable connects Sydney – Australia, Mangawhai Heads – New Zealand, Tafuna – American Samoa, Kapolei – Hawaii, USA, and Pacific City – Oregon, USA, including stubbed branching units to facilitate future connections to New Caledonia, Fiji, and Tonga.

Source: Final splice on completed on Hawaiki cable

Thin Light-Emitting Device Advances Design of Invisible Displays | Design News


Screens that virtually disappear when turned off are the future of display technology. Researchers at UC Berkeley are a step closer to achieving this goal with the invention of a bright-light-emitting device that is so atomically thin that it’s fully transparent when turned off.

The researchers in UC Berkeley’s Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences used a monolayer semiconductor just three atoms thick to develop the device, said Der-Hsien Lien, a postdoctoral fellow who worked on the project. The lab of Ali Javey, professor of electrical engineering and computer sciences, produced the device.

Source: Thin Light-Emitting Device Advances Design of Invisible Displays | Design News

Power Out Of Thin Air | Design News


One of the ongoing debates about the general acceptance of electric vehicles (EVs) is the need for wireless charging. Proponents of such systems point to the ability to park over a pad embedded in a parking spot and pick up 20-30 miles of range while grocery shopping.

They say that this so-called “opportunity charging” helps to reduce range anxiety, making EVs more attractive. If you put the same charging pad in your garage, you simply park over it at night and the car automatically adds the electricity needed for the next day’s commute.

Source: Power Out Of Thin Air | Design News

When three F-15 Jet fighters raced a solar eclipse | Military & Aerospace Electronics

As this National Geographic video shows, three F-15 Strike Eagles based at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho tried to race the eclipse as long as they could.

The problem: the moon’s shadow moved at 1,700 miles an hour, while the Earth rotates at 1,000 miles an hour. The goal was to stay in the moon’s shadow for three minutes.

Source: When three F-15 Jet fighters raced a solar eclipse – Military & Aerospace Electronics

The U.S. Navy wants undersea gas stations for underwater drones | Military & Aerospace Electronics

Teledyne, based in Thousand Oaks, California, showed off its undersea power station alongside Gavia, the company’s popular underwater surveillance drone, at the Sea-Air-Space Exposition in Maryland in April.

The underwater fuel-cell station stores 200 kilowatts of power and works down to a depth of nearly two miles, according to Defense News. An undersea drone could hook up to the station and charge its own fuel cells. A Gavia can operate for up to five hours on one 1.2-kilowatt charge.

Source: The U.S. Navy wants undersea gas stations for underwater drones – Military & Aerospace Electronics