COTS in space: the radiation barrier | Military & Aerospace Electronics


Several barriers to radiation-hardened space electronics must be overcome, including: fear of risk, resistance to change, storage, obsolescence, counterfeits, and lead-free barriers.

These man-made barriers were challenges also encountered by military users during the successful transition to the use of COTS components in military applications.

Source: COTS in space: the radiation barrier – Military & Aerospace Electronics

Aerospace entrepreneur Serge Dassault passes away at age 93 | Intelligent Aerospace

Serge Dassault’s adult life began dramatically when, in early 1944, he was imprisoned by the Gestapo with his parents and his brother at Montluc near Lyon, and then at Drancy, from where prisoners were shipped to the death camps.

The Nazis thought they could thus force his father Marcel Dassault to place his aircraft designer skills at the service of the Third Reich. Marcel Dassault refused and was deported to Buchenwald in August 1944, from where he miraculously returned in May 1945.

Of this tragic experience, Serge has always kept an attention to the human person, and to national sovereignty.

Source: Aerospace entrepreneur Serge Dassault passes away at age 93 – Intelligent Aerospace

NAWCAD test range engineer develops artificial intelligence, machine learning system for radar data | Intelligent Aerospace


Electrical Engineer Stephen Itschner at the Atlantic Test Range’s (ATR) at Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division (NAWCAD) in Patuxent River, Maryland, is developing an artificial intelligence (AI) system with the potential to teach itself how to recognize and remove external interference from radar signals.

The AI system is an outgrowth of Ph.D. research into pulsars and mysterious cosmic signals called fast radio bursts conducted by ATR’s Itschner.

Source: NAWCAD test range engineer develops artificial intelligence, machine learning system for radar data – Intelligent Aerospace

Safely Test High-Power Circuit Breakers | Design News


Given the high voltages and currents associated with high-power circuit breakers, research and development activities for these devices have the potential to be extremely hazardous.

Because they haven’t been thoroughly characterized at this stage, circuit breakers that are overstressed can explode and/or burn. To limit the possible damage, tests are typically performed in test cells with thick walls and bullet-proof glass.

Often, the testing location is separated from the test instrumentation by enough distance to protect operators and equipment from flying debris and smoke.

Source: Lessons Learned: Safely Test High-Power Circuit Breakers | Design News

Researchers Develop Battery-Free Smart Toys for Kids | Design News


Any parent knows the frustration of having to constantly replace batteries for your child’s favorite toy. Now, that problem may be solved with research from South Korea, where a team has applied a common energy-harvesting method to provide power for electronic toys and other mobile devices.

Researchers from Jeju National University in South Korea have incorporated triboelectric nanogenerators, or TENGS, into rubber ducks and clapping toys. TENG energy-harvesters use the triboelectric effect—basically the charge generated when two materials rub together, as in static electricity—to create energy.

Source: Researchers Develop Battery-Free Smart Toys for Kids | Design News

F-22s and F-35s will launch recoverable gremlins attack drones | Military & Aerospace Electronics

Air-recoverable drones, to become operational over the next few years, will bring a new phase of mission options enabling longer ranges, improved sensor payloads, advanced weapons and active command and control from the air.

For years, it has been possible to launch expendable drones from the air, without needing a ground control station, provided they do not return to an aircraft. Gremlins, by contrast, is a technical effort to engineer specially configured aerial drones able to both launch and return to a host aircraft.

Source: F-22s and F-35s will launch recoverable gremlins attack drones – Military & Aerospace Electronics

U.S. intelligence reports: Russia’s new hypersonic weapon to be ready for war by 2020 | Military & Aerospace Electronics


The intelligence sources said Russia successfully tested the hypersonic weapon, which could carry a nuclear warhead, twice in 2016. The third known test of the device, called a hypersonic glide vehicle, was reported a failure in October 2017 when the platform crashed seconds before striking its target.

Source: U.S. intelligence reports: Russia’s new hypersonic weapon to be ready for war by 2020 – Military & Aerospace Electronics

Electronics cooling failure threatens NOAA’s newest weather satellite | Military & Aerospace Electronics

Technicians are scrambling to understand the electronics cooling problem with the new weather satellite, which first arose several weeks ago on the spacecraft’s primary instrument.

Around midnight, at geostationary orbit 36,000 kilometers above the equator, the sun peers “over the shoulder” of Earth and directly into the ABI’s camera. On GOES-16, the solar heat is passed through to liquid coolant, which transitions to a vapor and is then passed through a radiator to dissipate the heat into space. For some reason, this cooling is not happening with the newer satellite’s system.

Source: Electronics cooling failure threatens NOAA’s newest weather satellite – Military & Aerospace Electronics

Footsteps, Pressure Sensors, and AI: The Next Step in Airport Security | EE Times

Physical biometrics, such as fingerprints, facial recognition, and retinal scans, are currently more commonly used for security purposes. However, behavioral biometrics such as gait recognition can also capture unique signatures delivered by a person’s natural behavioral and movement patterns. The team tested their data by using a large number of so-called “impostors” and a small number of users in three real-world security scenarios: airport security checkpoints, the workplace, and the home environment.

Source: Footsteps, Pressure Sensors, and AI: The Next Step in Airport Security | EE Times

How to Build a PCB: Through-Hole or Surface-Mount? | EEWeb Community


I spend my days and nights surrounded by printed circuit boards (PCBs). I work in a quick-turn assembly house by day, and by night I live in what sometimes looks like an assembly house. As I write these words, within eyesight, I have close to a dozen PC boards of my own design, maybe more.

That being the case, I’m often asked by people with a wide variety of levels of experience whether they should still use through-hole components, or if they should use surface-mount technology (SMT) wherever possible.

Now, 48,000 placements per hour are great if you need to sell a million phones a month, but what about those of us who might need 1,000 boards for an early-stage startup, 100 units for a hobby business, or just one or two boards for a one-off design?

Should folks like that still look at surface-mount parts, or should we stick with tried-and-true through-hole components that are so much easier to handle and solder (not to mention see)?

Source: How to Build a PCB: Through-Hole or Surface-Mount? | EEWeb Community