Chip Industry Maps Heterogeneous Integration | EE Times


In July 2016, the Semiconductor Industry Association scrapped a technology plan widely known within the industry as the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS). SIA’s decision to end the ITRS illustrated the industry’s admission that Moore’s Law is not just slowing down.

The industry needs new tools, charts, and programs to define research gaps between where it has been and where to go in an even more connected world.

This is where Nicky Lu, Chairman, CEO, and Founder of Taiwan’s Etron Technology, comes in.

Lu has long advocated “heterogeneous integration” (HI). He promotes the idea that the semiconductor industry must, at last, outgrow its obsession with pitch shrinkage. To push growth, it must go creative with the “heterogeneous integration of different technologies.”

Source: Chip Industry Maps Heterogeneous Integration | EE Times

Seamless Transport Ticketing for Smarter Cities | Smart Energy


Despite a sincere desire to support innovation and deliver superior experiences for passengers, transportation agencies have had to overcome significant legacy obstacles to deliver any considerable advances. Throughout the market, in South America and beyond, operators are bound to customized proprietary fare collection systems from a single-source supplier.

As a result, accommodating new technologies and the costs to upgrade systems are dictated at the pace and the price of the incumbent vendor.

The dominance of proprietary systems in the transport ticketing market, and the lack of ownership of the ticketing specifications by the transportation agencies is, undoubtedly, the central factor hindering innovation.

Source: Seamless Transport Ticketing for Smarter Cities | Smart Energy

U.S. needs immediate and sustained improvements in its cybersecurity workforce | NIST


A 2017 Center for Cyber Safety and Education report projects a global cybersecurity workforce shortage of 1.8 million by 2022.

There were an estimated 286,000 active openings for cybersecurity jobs in the United States as of November 2017, according to CyberSeek, an interactive tool that is funded through the National Initiative for Cybersecurity Education (NICE) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

Executive Order 13800 directed the secretaries of commerce and homeland security to “assess the scope and sufficiency of efforts to educate and train the American cybersecurity workforce of the future, including cybersecurity-related education curricula, training, and apprenticeship programs, from primary through higher education.”

Source: Press Release | NIST

June 2018 – The Challenges of Meeting the In-Flight Connectivity Demand | Via Satellite


“In the commercial airline space, passengers for whom this kind of connectivity is important are starting to select their airlines or aircraft type based on the connectivity,” Conway said. He noted this also applies to business and chartered jet services, in which some customers now ask for a specific tail number aircraft because they know it comes with the connectivity they need. “Passengers are voting with their selection of aircraft in that market,” he said.

And the aviation industry is responding. In January 2017, more than 80 airlines had already or planned to install IFC solutions, according to global consulting firm Euroconsult. The firm’s researchers predict that, within the next three years, more than 17,000 commercial aircraft will offer passengers some form of connectivity — a steep increase from 6,500 aircraft in 2016.

Source: June 2018 – The Challenges of Meeting the In-Flight Connectivity Demand | Via Satellite

What’s Driving the Evolution of the Unified Extensible Firmware Interface?


Needless to say, PC BIOS was not designed to be a long-term solution for the personal computer industry’s pre-boot and boot requirements, but as an expediency to get the first PC’s to boot. The popularity of the PC inspired the creation of the PC compatible industry as manufacturers began to develop and sell clones based upon the original product. By duplicating the original product, these clones were defined to include the same BIOS code and interfaces. PC BIOS became a standard that everyone copied.

This was the situation that continued on for years in the PC marketplace, but there were growing signs that the BIOS would eventually become unsustainable as the interface standard. When hard disk drives were added in the PC-AT (the second and upgraded version of the original PC-XT), there was an inherent limitation in the BIOS that had to be adjusted to allow for disk drives over 10.4 MB in capacity.

As time and technology moved forward, the BIOS standard began to unravel with 32-bit processors, larger capacity disk drives (the standard interface was limited to addressing a device of 504MB or smaller), new enhanced graphics capabilities, Ethernet and internet support, and the additions of new technologies like Universal Serial Bus (USB), Peripheral Component Interconnect Express (PCIe), and Embedded Multi Media Card (eMMC).

Like many things, the cost of the effort against the magnitude of gain was eventually to become untenable. And so, it was understood, that one day, the BIOS would face redesign or replacement.

Source: What’s Driving the Evolution of the Unified Extensible Firmware Interface?

Networking & Data Center Technologies | The Data Center Steps Forward to Dance Closer to Consumers


The telecom industry outside of the data center has a slightly different technology infrastructure. In a switching office, for instance, the physical size and layout of the cabinets, cooling, power sources, cabling, and overall environment are different.

This is one of the motivating market factors that led ADLINK and Radisys to collaborate and create the OCP carrier grade CG-OpenRack-19 and OpenSled Server specifications within the newly formed OCP Telecom Group.

This initiative lays the foundation for OCP gear in a telecom environment (OCP Carrier Grade, or OCP-CG). In essence, OCP-CG is pushing OCP architecture outside the data center to include telecom, mobile, and customer premises equipment (CPE), effectively opening up this open-architecture environment beyond data center walls. open-architecture environment beyond data center walls.

Source: Networking & Data Center Technologies » Wallflower No More: The Data Center Steps Forward to Dance Closer to Consumers

Wearables Growth Slows | EE Times


IDC said shipments of basic wearables declined by 9.2 percent year-over-year. At the same time, shipments of higher priced wearables from Apple, Fitbit and numerous fashion brands increased by 28.4 percent, IDC said, continuing a shift in consumer preferences toward smarter devices.

Source: Wearables Growth Slows | EE Times

System complexity, safety, security drive continued adoption of Ada, SPARK in aerospace and defense software engineering | Intelligent Aerospace


Through the choice of programming language and tools, program managers can significantly improve the quality of the software in the deployed application, ease the job of the developer writing the code, and reduce the cost of implementation and certification, should this be required.

Programming languages can provide generic features and built-in checks to help build safety-critical software. Ada is one such language and has a long history of being used in avionics projects. An example of one such feature is contract-based programming, introduced in Ada 2012.

Through contracts the developer can formalize the intended behavior of the application, and can verify this behavior by testing, static analysis, or formal proof. Very useful when building critical systems.

Source: System complexity, safety, security drive continued adoption of Ada, SPARK in aerospace and defense software engineering – Intelligent Aerospace

IoT Software Testing: Four Essential Elements | EE Times


The global Internet of Things (IoT) market is slated to grow to $8.9 trillion by 2020. IoT segments in the B2B sector alone will generate more than $300 billion annually by 2020, according to Bain & Company.

These figures attest to IoT’s enormous potential —– and with more than 11 billion connected things projected to be in use this year, that potential is already being realized.

But the promise of IoT is not without risk. Hackers have exploited connected devices to mine cryptocurrency and launch high-profile cyberattacks, fostering public distrust and generating regulatory scrutiny that could ensnare a wide range of stakeholders.

Source: IoT Software Testing: Four Essential Elements | EE Times

Disruptive 3D Printing Forces Companies to Reconsider Manufacturing | Design News


“The vast majority of those working with 3D printing still don’t see it in a broad enough perspective. They take this component or part that they’ve made for years, and say, ‘What would it take to 3D print it?’ It takes more time and money, and so they say this doesn’t work for us,” Jack Heslin, president and VP of business development at 3DTechTalks and Lazarus3D, told Design News.

“But they’re not redesigning their manufacturing to take advantage of 3D printing. If they do, they might find that what was 100 parts will be 10 parts or less. That will affect their time-to-market, their accounting, their cost, everything.”

Source: Disruptive 3D Printing Forces Companies to Reconsider Manufacturing | Design News