How Increasingly Severe El Niños Are Threatening Tropical Forests Around the World | Pacific Standard


Junjie Liu’s team at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, found that, during the 2015–16 El Niño, extreme drought meant trees stopped absorbing CO in South America. In Southeast Asia, forest fires raged in extremely dry conditions, quickly releasing stored carbon. And in tropical Africa, high temperatures resulted in increased ecosystem respiration.

Together, the three regions emitted 2.5 gigatons more carbon during the 2015–16 El Niño than during the opposing phase of the cycle, known as La Niña, in 2011, with emissions split roughly evenly between the three forest regions.

Source: How Increasingly Severe El Niños Are Threatening Tropical Forests Around the World – Pacific Standard

READ  Catalonia crisis encourages separatists, but could it fracture Europe? | LA Times

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *