Chip Industry on Edge as Trade War Heats Up | EE Times


The SEMI trade group, which represents semiconductor equipment suppliers, EDA vendors, and companies involved in the electronics supply chain, has voiced support for the administration’s efforts to protect intellectual property, but said that it does not believe the tariffs will do anything to address U.S. concerns over China’s trade practices.

Source: Chip Industry on Edge as Trade War Heats Up | EE Times

Israel Aerospace unveils 3D tactical radar system | Military & Aerospace Electronics

The ELM-2138M AD can be used as mobile force protection 3D radar as well as gap filler to complement the local or national air situation picture/recognized air picture (ASP/RAP), encompassing a broad range of airborne targets – such as transport aircraft, high-speed fighters, helicopters, glide bombs, or drones.

The radar can also provide Rocket, Artillery and Mortar (RAM) detection, providing real time accurate launch and impact point information of incoming hostile fire.

Source: Israel Aerospace unveils 3D tactical radar system – Military & Aerospace Electronics

Huawei demos 600G transmission tech

Huawei has completed what it claims is the industry’s first live demonstration of a 600G single-wavelength ultra-high-speed transmission system.

The test saw Huawei deploy its own channel-matched saping technology and artificial intelligence neuron module on an optical network, with single fibre capacity of 40Tbps.

The aim of the technology is to boost network efficiency and enable the evolution from existing traditional networking technology to intent-driven networks, Huawei said.

This would help support deployment of new developments such as 5G, cloud computing and big data.

Source: Huawei demos 600G transmission tech

Air Force’s B-21 Bomber Nears Key Design Review | Defense Daily Network

The U.S. Air Force, which has been developing the B-21 Raider for almost three years, is on track to conduct a critical design review (CDR) by year’s end, a service official said June 25.

The Air Force plans to buy at least 100 B-21s and begin fielding them in the mid-2020s to replace the B-1 and B-2. The Air Force’s fiscal year 2019 budget includes $2.3 billion for the new stealth bomber, up from $2 billion in FY 2018.

Source: Air Force’s B-21 Bomber Nears Key Design Review – Defense Daily Network

Why Bacteria Survive in Space—Biologists Discover Clues


To gain access into the uber-sanitized clean rooms at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, the world’s largest clean room, or the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Caltech, California, employees pass through a series of lobbies.

One, with adhesive floor mats, traps dirt carried on shoes. Another, about the size of an old phone booth, delivers a forced-air shower where dozens of air jets blow away dirt and debris. Only after these sterilization measures can they don the bodysuits, head covers and other disinfected regalia.

And still, bacteria survive and have been carried onboard the International Space Station and found on the Mars Rover. The ability of bacteria to survive extreme conditions could potentially lead to a process called ‘forward contamination.’

Source: Why Bacteria Survive in Space—Biologists Discover Clues

Color-Changing Material Inspired by Chameleons, Other Animals


A team from Nagoya University in Japan has created a composite material that, when its composition is adjusted and exposed to different types of light, can mimic changes in color similar to how animals like chameleons, octopuses and frogs change color in response to changes in the environment.

The new material is comprised of dyes and crystals that change the color and patterns it displays depending on the background color used within it and its exposure to visible or ultraviolet light.

Source: Color-Changing Material Inspired by Chameleons, Other Animals

The very first recorded computer bug

Ever wondered where the term ‘bug’ came from?

Well, on September 9, 1945, U.S. Navy officer Grace Hopper found a moth between the relays on the Harvard Mark II computer she was working on.

In those days computers filled (large) rooms and the warmth of the internal components attracted moths, flies and other flying creatures. Those creatures then shortened circuits and caused the computer to malfunction.

Source: The very first recorded computer bug

Related>

PTS Could Unlock Major Opportunities for Commercial Satellite | Via Satellite

“We’re going to continue to rely heavily on commercial providers for PTS (Protected Tactical Satcom). There’s no way we’re going to build it alone,” said Air Force SMC Chief of International MilSatCom Deanna Ryals.

“PTS is a top priority for SMC (Space and Missile Systems Center). Our commercial industry and international partners should see this as a major opportunity. In order to strengthen PTS, we are going to seek follow on contracts for Advanced Extremely High Frequency System (AEHF) systems for military satcom users who need the highest level of protection.”

Source: PTS Could Unlock Major Opportunities for Commercial Satellite – Via Satellite –

Magnetic 3D-Printed Structures Can Crawl, Jump, Play Catch | Design News


“We think in biomedicine, this technique will find promising applications,” said Xuanhe Zhao, an MIT professor, in an MIT press release.

“For example, we could put a structure around a blood vessel to control the pumping of blood, or use a magnet to guide a device through the GI tract to take images, extract tissue samples, clear a blockage, or deliver certain drugs to a specific location. You can design, simulate, and then just print to achieve various functions.”

Source: Magnetic 3D-Printed Structures Can Crawl, Jump, Play Catch | Design News

Carbon Dioxide to Liquid Fuel: Is It Time to Make the Leap? | Design News


If we are placing plants in a position where they cannot keep up, then maybe we can build machines to remove enough CO2 to make a difference.

That’s the idea behind the NRG COSIA Carbon X-Prize. It’s a $20 million global competition to create breakthrough technologies to convert CO2 emissions from power plants into useful things like building materials or even alternative fuels.

The competition started in 2015.

At this point, there are ten finalists whose ideas are being tested on a large scale at facilities adjacent to existing power plants. Among the ideas are creation of concrete, plastics, food, and synthetic fuels from the CO2 that would normally be sent into the atmosphere.

By 2020, a winner of the competition will be announced.

Source: Op-Ed: Carbon Dioxide to Liquid Fuel: Is It Time to Make the Leap? | Design News