Getting Real About Mobile 5G Speeds | Light Reading

That’s quite a range of speeds right? From 100 Mbit/s to 4.1 Gbit/s! What’s going on here?

Firstly, the 4.1Gbit/s peak speeds should taken with a grain of salt. A “peak speed” is usually meaningless in a shared wireless network environment, it’s the “test driver, empty track” headline speed you never actually get!

Much more interesting is the 444Mbit/s average speed promised on the blended mobile network. This will, of course, incorporate higher and lower speeds across the network to get to that average figure. Still, the average on the current 4G LTE T-Mobile network is around 32 Mbit/s. So this is an expected 10x increase — on mobile — over today’s network.

Of course, behind the topline figures on 5G, a lot of radio network work and bolstering of backhaul capabilities will need to happen.

That’s quite a range of speeds right? From 100 Mbit/s to 4.1 Gbit/s! What’s going on here?Firstly, the 4.1Gbit/s peak speeds should taken with a grain of salt.

A “peak speed” is usually meaningless in a shared wireless network environment, it’s the “test driver, empty track” headline speed you never actually get!Much more interesting is the 444Mbit/s average speed promised on the blended mobile network. This will, of course, incorporate higher and lower speeds across the network to get to that average figure.

Still, the average on the current 4G LTE T-Mobile network is around 32 Mbit/s. So this is an expected 10x increase — on mobile — over today’s network.Of course, behind the topline figures on 5G, a lot of radio network work and bolstering of backhaul capabilities will need to happen.

Source: Getting Real About Mobile 5G Speeds | Light Reading

Terrestrial broadcasters get on the 5G roadmap | EDN


jurisdictions around the world have already set aside, or are planning to set aside, bandwidth all over the spectrum range, including multiple bands below 6 GHz and multiple bands near and in the millimeter wave range. One project will be support for the new bands allocated for 5G. Another project the 3GPP will proceed with is aimed at bringing cellular into industrial IoT. The specific goal is factory usage, said Lorenzo Casaccia vice president of technical standards at Qualcomm.

Another project will be low-power IoT applications. The generic example is an application in which a great many inexpensive sensors will be deployed. In this sort of application, sensors would typically exchange very small packets of information. The schedule for exchanges could range from quite frequent to exceedingly rare.

Yet another project is vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communications.

Source: Terrestrial broadcasters get on the 5G roadmap | EDN

A Path to Broad AI: 5 Challenges | EE Times

AI, as we know it today, is being applied to language translation, speech transcription, object detection, and face recognition. Dario Gil, vice president of AI and IBM Q at IBM Research, calls this “a narrow form of AI” in which AI runs a single task in a single domain.

“There are hundreds of applications, and the list is quite long,” said Gil. IBM is tracking AI challenges in a spectrum of applications that range from design automation, industrial, healthcare, and visual inspection to customer care, marketing/business, IoT, and compliance.

Source: A Path to Broad AI: 5 Challenges | EE Times

5G Testing and Conformance Bring New Challenges | EE Times


A further issue is the use of dynamic beamforming antennas in this frequency range to overcome high path loss and line-of-sight blockage. Representing these spatial characteristics in an emulated lab test scenario represents a new challenge compared with existing test methods.

Until these challenges are overcome, higher uncertainties will remain. The whole industry needs to work in unison to resolve remaining issues with OTA testing and dynamic beamforming.

Source: 5G Testing and Conformance Bring New Challenges | EE Times

On the EU’s Space Program and new EU Agency for Space Proposal | Via Satellite


The European Commission (EC), seeking to assert more control over European space policy, regulation and governance, has published a proposal for a regulation establishing the EU space program and the EU Agency for the Space Program.

The establishment of this new agency does raise a question of governance of space activities in Europe, especially considering that ESA has its own space program, a separate legal foundation and certain non-EU members (Norway and Switzerland) and cooperating states such as Canada.

It has an entirely different industrial policy, based on “geographical return” in which the investment by a member state in an ESA program is returned to that member state through industry contracts.

Source: July 2018 – On the EU’s Space Program and new EU Agency for Space Proposal | Via Satellite

Airbus Makes Universal Space Access a Reality for UN | Via Satellite


Airbus will provide free payload space and expanded accss to hosting platforms and Earth observational data solutions to United Nations (UN) member states after signing a five-year, renewable Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the UN Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOOSA).

Airbus said the agreement will give UN member states the opportunity to participate in Earth observation, robotics, material science, and astrophysics experiments in microgravity using the operator’s Bartolomeo platform, which is attached to the European Columbus Module of the International Space Station (ISS).

Source: Airbus Makes Universal Space Access a Reality for UN – Via Satellite –

Patent Reforms Need Reform Now | EE Times


This United States Patent grants to the person(s) having title to this patent the right to exclude others from making, using, offering for sale, or selling the invention throughout the United States of America or importing the invention into the United States of America, and if the invention is a process, of the right to exclude others from using, offering for sale or selling throughout the United States of America, products made by that process, for the term set forth in 35 U.S.C. 154(a)(2) or (c)(1), subject to the payment of maintenance fees as provided by 35 U.S.C. 41(b).  See the Maintenance Fee Notice on the inside of the cover.

These words no longer mean what they say. Well, maybe except for the part about maintenance fees.

Twenty years ago, patents still had value. Duly issued U.S. patents were legally valid and patent owners could rely on the presumption of validity if they had to defend them in court. Patent owners could practice, enforce or license them. Patents were personal, private property rights, protected by the copyright clause in Article 1, Section 8 of the Constitution.

All this has changed. Today, none of this is guaranteed or supported by U.S. law or courts.

Source: Patent Reforms Need Reform Now | EE Times

Siemens-Mentor: How’s It Working Out? | EE Times


As Siemens AG CEO and President Joe Kaeser sees it, Siemens’s acquisition of Mentor was designed to prove that the “physical world and mechanical worlds can be simulated.”

It took Siemens a long time to understand that it’s not just the mechanical world that needs to be simulated, acknowledged Kaeser. The fusion of the industries enabled the miniaturization of electrical systems, and “if you go about miniaturizing systems, you go into semiconductors,” he said. Simulations of miniaturized systems thus demand simulations of semiconductors, and that’s where Mentor comes in.

Source: Siemens-Mentor: How’s It Working Out? | EE Times

Synopsys Settles with Mentor, Agrees to Collaboration | EE Times

The settlement agreement includes a seven-year patent cross-licensing agreement between Synopsys and Mentor. It presumably brings to an end a long-running battle over emulation technology that began between Mentor and EVE SA, a French emulation firm that Synopsys acquired in 2012. As recently as last year, an appeals court upheld a  $36 million jury verdict in favor of Mentor in the case.

More broadly, the deal between Synopsys and Siemens includes collaboration on a range of EDA product interoperability projects for the benefit of mutual customers, spanning applications from design to verification.

Source: Synopsys Settles with Mentor, Agrees to Collaboration | EE Times

Optical Nets Need Tunable Optics | EE Times


There is one piece of the NG-PON2 puzzle missing – widespread availability of low-cost, reliable, tunable optics.

NG-PON2 uses both time- and wave-division multiplexing. Wavelengths assigned to each ONT can change, for example, in a protection switching scenario. This means the ONT transceivers must be capable of quickly adapting to transmission reconfigurations. In addition, the NG-PON2 channel bonding means transceivers can receive signals on multiple wavelengths.

Currently, NG-PON2 defines no minimum switching speed. The community has accepted 50msec as a minimum switching speed with 25msec and 10msec seen as potential targets.

These requirements make high-performance, cost-effective tunable modules vital for operators to consider deploying NG-PON2 on a mass scale.

Source: Optical Nets Need Tunable Optics | EE Times