Twitter chief faces GOP anger over bias at hearing | TheHill


House Republicans grilled Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey on Wednesday during a hearing on alleged bias against conservatives in social media, capping a marathon day of testimony for the Silicon Valley executive.

Dorsey told lawmakers on the House Energy and Commerce Committee that Twitter did not intentionally censor conservative voices, but those denials failed to assuage Republicans.

“I want to start by making something clear: we don’t consider political viewpoints, perspectives, or party affiliation in any of our policies or enforcement decisions. Period. Impartiality is our guiding principle,” Dorsey said, reading his statement from his phone.

Republicans used the hearing to directly confront Dorsey about their allegations and call for action.

Source: Twitter chief faces GOP anger over bias at hearing | TheHill

Live coverage: Social media execs face grilling on Capitol Hill | TheHill


Lawmakers on the Senate Intelligence Committee and House Energy and Commerce Committee grilled top executives from Twitter and Facebook on their efforts to combat foreign influence operations on their platforms in a pair of hearings on Wednesday.

The events served as a major test for Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey and Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg, marking their first public congressional hearing appearances.

Source: Live coverage: Social media execs face grilling on Capitol Hill | TheHill

Dems switch tactics on second day of hearings | TheHill


The morning began with repeated outbursts from protesters shouting “save Roe, vote no” and “no Trump puppet” as Kavanaugh tried to press on and answer the first questions of the day from Grassley.

Feinstein appeared almost collegial with Kavanaugh. When he delivered a lengthy answer to whether a sitting president can be subject to a criminal investigation, she joked that he was trying to “filibuster” the committee.

Source: Dems switch tactics on second day of hearings | TheHill

British Navy warship sails near South China Sea islands, angering Beijing | Reuters


China’s claims in the South China Sea, through which some $3 trillion of shipborne trade passes each year, are contested by Brunei, Malaysia, the Philippines, Taiwan and Vietnam. Britain does not have any territorial claims in the area.

While the U.S. Navy has conducted Freedom of Navigation Operations (FONOPs) in the same area in the past, this British challenge to China’s growing control of the strategic waterway comes after the United States has said it would like to see more international participation in such actions.

Source: Exclusive: British Navy warship sails near South China Sea islands, angering Beijing | Reuters

CO2 limits on cars risk ‘social catastrophe’, industry says | EURACTIV.com


The European Automobile Manufacturers Association (ACEA), which represents carmakers like BMW, Renault and Volkswagen, insists that a 20% CO2 target is the limit of what can be achieved and has cited a Commission impact assessment from 2016 that also backed 20%.

Aside from arguing that the EU executive’s proposal is “hypocritical” due to a perceived reliance on electric vehicle uptake, despite the Commission’s insistence that its policymaking is technology neutral, ACEA also believes that the proposal could cost Europe jobs.

Source: CO2 limits on cars risk ‘social catastrophe’, industry says – EURACTIV.com

5 reasons federal agencies are so challenged by identity and access management | FCW


While the problems surrounding IAM are not specific to the public sector, they have a critical impact on government. Proper IAM is necessary for federal employees to access pertinent data, systems, and facilities and ensure that agencies are not compromised by external actors.

As traditional identifiers like Social Security numbers become outdated and easily compromised, personal, business and federal data becomes increasingly at risk.

Source: 5 reasons federal agencies are so challenged by identity and access management — FCW

DOD extends JEDI deadline | FCW


In an Aug. 30 FedBizOpps posting, the Pentagon extended the deadline for proposals for the $10 billion single-award contract to Oct. 9 from the prior due date of Sept. 17. That item is one of two major updates to the final solicitation for the Joint Enterprise Defense Infrastructure (JEDI) contract to acquire a commercial cloud environment for the military. The other significant update is DOD is “not accepting any additional questions or comments” regarding the request for proposals, but not before one last listing of 59 questions from industry and government responses to them.

Based on that industry feedback, it appears that DOD has heard complaints about its planned timeline for the JEDI procurement given its size, specs and scope. There is also the fact that DOD is facing a pre-award protest from Oracle filed Aug. 6 with a Government Accountability Office decision anticipated by Nov. 14.

Source: DOD extends JEDI deadline — FCW