Molecular Hopper Can Move Individual DNA Strands


A research team from the University of Oxford has developed a molecular hopper that is small enough to be able to move single strands of DNA through a protein nanotube.

The device works by making and breaking in sequence simple chemical bonds that attach it to a nanoscale track that can be turned on, off or reversed by a small electrical potential.

Source: Molecular Hopper Can Move Individual DNA Strands

Cannibalistic Materials Feed on Themselves to Grow New Nanostructures


The findings, reported in Nature Communications, provide insights that may improve design of 2D materials for fast-charging energy-storage and electronic devices.

“Under our experimental conditions, titanium and carbon atoms can spontaneously form an atomically thin layer of 2D transition-metal carbide, which was never observed before,” said Xiahan Sang of ORNL.

Source: Cannibalistic Materials Feed on Themselves to Grow New Nanostructures

Capacity Media | Datacenter Group doubles capacity with acquisition of Rao Bouwfonds Communication’s data centres


The deal, which was financed through debt and cash only, sees TDCG (The Datacenter Group) buy two facilities from Rao Bouwfonds Communication, taking its footprint to over 20,000Msq of server space across Amsterdam, Delft, Utrect, and Rotterdam.

The Datacenter Group is an carrier- and cloud neutral TIER III twin-datacenter located Amsterdam, Delft, Rotterdam and Utrecht. The deal includes two tier 3 data centres, in Nieuwegein and Rotterdam, serving large Dutch and international companies and organisations, but TDCG did not disclose the value of the transaction.

Source: Capacity Media – global telecoms news, events and community

Capacity Media | Telia Carrier adds new PoP in Tokyo


Telia Carrier has expanded the reach of its global backbone in the Asia Pacific region by launching a new point of presence in Tokyo, Japan.

The new PoP will see Telia’s network offer support for high-speed IP transit, cloud connect, Ethernet, and IPX services for operators, consumers and enterprises in Japan and across the rest of the region.

Source: Capacity Media – global telecoms news, events and community

Apple Goes Vertical & Why It Matters | EE Times


Why would Apple want to bring large-scale semiconductor design in-house? It is an expensive endeavor.

But in the spring of 2008, Apple announced the acquisition of PA Semi, a largely unknown processor design house focused on Digital’s StrongARM technology. Apple said that they wanted to further differentiate their products. Later, rumors started to emerge that Apple acquired Intrinsity, another processor designer. They were marketing their Hummingbird Arm-based CPU. This latter acquisition was confirmed in April 2010.

On Jan. 27, 2010, Steve Jobs took to the stage to introduce the iPad and the Apple-designed A4 SoC. I thought about the possibly impending tablet and its silicon a week before the keynote. I thought a tablet would require silicon that is between that in the iPhone and a MacBook. I also asked “…what happens if you could design your own processor with blocks tailored solely to your device and its application?”

The A-series, and what I consider the “modern” Apple semiconductor effort, was underway.

Source: Apple Goes Vertical & Why It Matters | EE Times

Mapping the Future of Electronics | EE Times

Depending on who you believe, Moore’s Law has either run out of gas or is sputtering along on fumes. What emerges as the semiconductor industry’s guiding principle in the post-Moore’s Law era is a matter of considerable debate. But, increasingly, engineers and chip firms are eyeing the concept of heterogeneous integration — separately manufactured silicon and non-silicon components integrated into a higher level system in the same three-dimensional system-in-package — as the electronics productivity driver of the future.

The meeting that Ajit Manocha, president and CEO of the SEMI trade group, spoke at that day in July was in fact a workshop for the Heterogeneous Integration Roadmap (HIR), an IEEE-backed effort to create a pre-competitive technology roadmap outlining a long term vision for HI and identify challenges and potential solutions.

Source: Mapping the Future of Electronics | EE Times

13 Hot Chips from Summer 2018 | EE Times

For its part, Xilinx showed a major new variant of the FPGA, geared for AI and more. And attendees heard a call to action to design a whole new computing architecture grouded in security.

Keynoter John Hennessey, chairman of Alphabet, noted that the widely used technique of speculative execution had been vulnerable to side-channel attacks for 20 years before computer architects at Google saw the open door.

Source: 13 Hot Chips from Summer 2018 | EE Times

China in race for counter-drone technology and laser weapons as it tries to catch up with U.S.


One system under development is Silent Hunter, a portable drone-killing laser weapon that is said to have a firing range as far as 2.5 miles and was demonstrated at a defense conference in Abu Dhabi in February.

Officials of Poly Technologies in Beijing, the company behind the Chinese counter-drone system, say it could pierce five layers of 2-millimeter-thick steel plates from a distance of half a mile.

Experts say U.S. anti-drone systems are more advanced than China’s, and have a bigger range and more types of sensing technology available from a greater number of companies.

Source: China in race for counter-drone technology and laser weapons as it tries to catch up with U.S.

Lockheed Martin pitching U.S. Air Force on F-22-F-35 hybrid fighter intended for Japan


The new F-22-F-35 hybrid variant — similar to one Lockheed Martin is pitching to Japan — would incorporate the F-35’s more modern mission system and other advancements in the stealth coatings and things of that nature. Lockheed Martin declined comment.

The hybrid aircraft proposal has echoes of the late-1990s evolution of the F/A-18 Hornet into the Super Hornet. Pitched as a low-risk project, the F/A-18E/F turned out to require a redesign of almost every exterior part. The new wing proved initially troublesome, but the design eventually proved successful.

Source: Lockheed Martin pitching U.S. Air Force on F-22-F-35 hybrid fighter intended for Japan

MIT scientists envision a way to enable submerged submarines to communicate with airplanes


.. thanks to researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, Mass. MIT engineers created an underwater-to-air communications system called translational acoustic-RF communication (TARF) that seamlessly can convert sonar into radar.

The TARF technology turns the water surface from an obstacle into a communication interface by combining sound and radio in an innovative way. It uses an underwater speaker to send data as sound, which vibrates the surface. Sensitive radar aboard overhead aircraft then could pick up these vibrations, and decode them to recover the sound data.

Source: MIT scientists envision a way to enable submerged submarines to communicate with airplanes