September 23, 2018 – Most-Viewed Bills | Congress.gov

September 23, 2018

1. H.R.610 [115th] To distribute Federal funds for elementary and secondary education in the form of vouchers for eligible students and to repeal a certain rule relating to nutrition standards in schools.
2. H.R.5428 [115th] Stand with UK against Russia Violations Act
3. H.R.6157 [115th] Department of Defense and Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education Appropriations Act, 2019 and Continuing Appropriations Act, 2019
4. H.R.6 [115th] SUPPORT for Patients and Communities Act
5. H.R.392 [115th] Fairness for High-Skilled Immigrants Act of 2017
6. H.R.4318 [115th] Miscellaneous Tariff Bill Act of 2018
7. S.281 [115th] Fairness for High-Skilled Immigrants Act of 2017
8. H.R.5515 [115th] John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019
9. H.R.5895 [115th] Energy and Water, Legislative Branch, and Military Construction and Veterans Affairs Appropriations Act, 2019
10. H.R.1 [115th] An Act to provide for reconciliation pursuant to titles II and V of the concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal year 2018.

Source: Most-Viewed Bills – Congress.gov Resources –

Cyber criminals increasingly target cryptocurrency, research finds | TheHill


Bitcoin has a $232 billion market, and approximately $1.5 billion worth of cryptocurrency has been stolen in the past two years, according to McAfee.

“Today, the tremendous volume of such devices online and their propensity for weak passwords present a very attractive platform for this activity,” Christiaan Beek, the lead scientist and senior principal engineer with McAfee Advanced Threat Research, said in a statement.

“If I were a cybercriminal who owns a botnet of 100,000 such [internet of things] IoT devices, it would cost me next to nothing financially to produce enough cryptocurrency to create a new, profitable revenue stream.”

Source: Cyber criminals increasingly target cryptocurrency, research finds | TheHill

State officials press Sessions on tech privacy worries | TheHill


According to attendees, Sessions raised the issue of how Silicon Valley handles political speech, the intended focus of the meeting. But many of the attorneys general instead put the spotlight on data privacy and concerns about market power.

“I’ve got to say that the AGs were much more focused on privacy and the use of personal information, the extent of full disclosures and the commercialization of that personal information,” said Karl Racine (D), the attorney general for Washington, D.C., in a phone interview.

Sessions announced the meeting earlier this month as Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey was testifying on Capitol Hill. Dorsey faced tough questions from GOP lawmakers over accusations that conservatives were being targeted on his platform.

Dorsey and other tech leaders have insisted their platforms only police behavior, not political content.

Source: State officials press Sessions on tech privacy worries | TheHill

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Silicon Valley’s Internet of the Future is Just as Censored as China’s Firewall | Nextgov


The internet is often known as our “digital public square.” But like any shared space, it is never neutral: It must have politics. As we stand at a crossroads of contention around internet governance, these politics are being called into question and reshaped.

Will the internet’s town square be like Tiananmen Square, locked down behind barriers, checkpoints, and under heavy surveillance, where any hint of public dissent gets swept away?

Will the internet be more like Times Square, a mashup of private and public spaces competing for your attention with advertisements, technically open but with heavily armed police officers and surveillance cameras?

Or maybe it will be more like the wide-open space of Washington DC’s National Mall, negotiated and controlled by government and private groups with competing political agendas.

Source: Silicon Valley’s Internet of the Future is Just as Censored as China’s Firewall – Nextgov

White House Unveils Plan to Dominate Quantum Technology | Nextgov


“Through developments in QIS (Quantum Information Science), the United States can improve its industrial base, create jobs, and provide economic and national security benefits,” the National Science and Technology Council Subcommittee on QIS said in the strategic plan. “Prior examples of QIS-related technologies … underpin significant parts of the national economic and defense infrastructure. Future scientific and technological discoveries from QIS may be even more impactful.”

At the summit, the Energy Department announced it would pour some $218 million into 85 quantum-focused research projects at multiple universities and national laboratories.

Through a series of two- to five-year awards, the agency aims to develop new quantum computing hardware and software, create materials with quantum properties and explore ways QIS can improve humanity’s understanding of the universe.

Source: White House Unveils Plan to Dominate Quantum Technology – Nextgov

UN audience laughs when Trump boasts of achievements | TheHill

“In less than two years, my administration has accomplished more than almost any administration in the history of our country,” Trump said, opening his address to the U.N. General Assembly.

Audience members then began chuckling and the laughs grew louder when Trump said “so true.”

Trump smiled and paused, then responded: “I didn’t expect that reaction but that’s OK.”

Source: UN audience laughs when Trump boasts of achievements | TheHill

NYT becomes news story on Kavanaugh, Rosenstein | TheHill


The first story drew displeasure from liberal Times readers and the broader anti-Trump “resistance” on social media. The latter earned rare — and short-lived — praise from Republicans.

Meanwhile, the newspaper of record has stood by its performance.

“At its most fundamental, a journalist’s mission is to follow the facts wherever they lead, with no regard for the political consequences,” Dean Baquet, executive editor of The Times, said in an email. “That’s how we view the Times’s role.”

Source: The Memo: NYT becomes news story on Kavanaugh, Rosenstein | TheHill

New York Times, New Yorker Spar Over Kavanaugh Story

Ramirez’s account is by no means bulletproof.

In her conversations with the magazine, Ramirez wasn’t initially certain of Kavanaugh’s role in the incident.

She acknowledges significant gaps in her memory, and says she was drunk when it occurred. The article’s authors, Ronan Farrow and Jane Mayer, addressed these doubts in reporting and commentary throughout the article, allowing that it was far from certain that Kavanaugh did anything untoward.

Source: New York Times, New Yorker Spar Over Kavanaugh Story

Kavanaugh tactics divide Democrats | TheHill


Progressive outside groups and a growing number of senators are calling for Kavanaugh to withdraw his nomination following two sexual misconduct allegations that have left considerable doubt over his Supreme Court confirmation — which was considered a sure thing earlier this month.

Democratic leaders have stopped short of such calls.

Source: Kavanaugh tactics divide Democrats | TheHill

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Grassley to Feinstein: We won’t delay Kavanaugh hearing | TheHill


“He has asked the Committee repeatedly for the chance to testify as soon as possible. He has categorically denied the allegations that have been made public. … We can no longer stand in the way of him presenting his testimony before the Committee,” Grassley added.

Feinstein, in her letter to Grassley, which was sent on Sunday, argued that the hearing should be delayed until the FBI could investigate allegations from Ford and Deborah Ramirez.

Source: Grassley to Feinstein: We won’t delay Kavanaugh hearing | TheHill