The Supreme Court Is Coming Apart | The New York Times


.. today the Supreme Court is in trouble. And the issues are much larger than the mess of Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation. Absent some kind of course correction, the court risks a crisis of legitimacy.

There are two fundamental problems. The first is that the court has become an intensely partisan institution that pretends otherwise.

The second major threat to the court comes from the radicalness of Republican-appointed justices.

Source: Opinion | The Supreme Court Is Coming Apart – The New York Times

The GOP’s Least-Worst Option Is If Kavanaugh Withdraws — And Soon | FiveThirtyEight


Brett Kavanaugh has never been a popular Supreme Court nominee — and he’s probably becoming more unpopular still following allegations earlier this month by Christine Blasey Ford that Kavanaugh had sexually assaulted her when they both were in high school.

No one this unpopular has ever been confirmed to the Supreme Court; the only previous nominees who polled as poorly as Kavanaugh either had their names withdrawn (Harriet Miers) or lost their confirmation vote (Robert Bork).

Source: The GOP’s Least-Worst Option Is If Kavanaugh Withdraws — And Soon | FiveThirtyEight

The Republican party is about to face the wrath of women | The Guardian


If there’s cause for hope in these horror-show days, it’s this: the Republican party has no idea what’s about to hit it this November.

Even the dimmest and most misogynist of Republican operatives must realize, by this point, that the supreme court nomination of Brett Kavanaugh and the handling of the sexual assault allegations against him will hurt their chances, especially with women voters, in the upcoming midterm elections.

Source: The Republican party is about to face the wrath of women | LA Kauffman | Opinion | The Guardian

The danger of Democratic overreach: The Kavanaugh hearings could fuel Republican turnout, as many Americans see the weaponization of #MeToo | NY Daily News


Headlines like this one, in The Atlantic, abound: “Brett Kavanaugh Could Make the Midterms a Landmark Election for Women.”

Left-wing groups are audibly salivating: “[I]t is on fire out there, and women voters in particular are ready to see big, big change,” said Stephanie Schriock, the president of EMILY’s List.

Not so fast.

Source: The danger of Democratic overreach: The Kavanaugh hearings could fuel Republican turnout, as many Americans see the weaponization of #MeToo – NY Daily News

Republicans push forward despite new Kavanaugh allegations | TheHill


The latest accusation came on the eve of Thursday’s high-stakes hearing, where Kavanaugh and Christine Blasey Ford are expected to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee in a make-or-break moment for President Trump’s second nominee to the high court in as many years.

Source: Republicans push forward despite new Kavanaugh allegations | TheHill

Trump says his past accusers influence thinking on Kavanaugh


On Wednesday, Trump spoke aloud what he’s been mulling in private, acknowledging publicly for the first time that past allegations of sexual misconduct leveled against him color his views on similar charges against other men, including Kavanaugh.

“It does impact my opinion and you know why?” Trump said. “Because I’ve had a lot of false charges against me.”

With that, Trump cast his lot with the accused in what has become a national reckoning over gender and sexual consent, and not just in furtherance of a long-sought conservative makeover of the high court.

Source: Trump says his past accusers influence thinking on Kavanaugh

Kavanaugh, Ford testify: What to watch for | TheHill


Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the Supreme Court is likely to be determined by Thursday’s blockbuster hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee.

The panel will hear from Kavanaugh and Christine Blasey Ford, who in written testimony on Wednesday gave a vivid account of an incident from a party in the 1980s where she alleges the Supreme Court nominee attacked her when the two were teenagers.

Source: Kavanaugh, Ford testify: What to watch for | TheHill

Related>

Brett Kavanaugh’s Confirmation Fight Exposes Major Problems | Time


For the Supreme Court, the stakes go beyond Kavanaugh’s fate.

It’s the latest evolution of a nominally non-partisan institution into an instrument of politics. In a nation divided, left and right are coming to view the court less as an interpreter of the law than as an activist imposer of moral and political outcomes.

“It’s no coincidence that confirmations were less contentious when the court was engaging in less political decisionmaking,” says Leonard Leo, a top adviser to President Trump on judicial nominations.

“When the court injects itself into lots of things that it shouldn’t, and when there’s lots of overreach by the court, that’s an inevitable thing.”

If some partisans celebrate the change, plenty of other Americans might mourn it.

Source: Brett Kavanaugh’s Confirmation Fight Exposes Major Problems | Time

How AI will change the way government works | FCW


AI is already integrated into numerous cloud platforms and can be used to discover new information and deliver outcomes instantly.

I like to refer to this as “practical AI.” AI has the potential to improve employee experiences by speeding up decision-making and automating mundane and repetitive tasks.

Bringing machine learning to everyday work enables government agencies and departments to make better decisions faster, because they do not have to hunt for data and aggregate it into a spreadsheet.

By building intelligence into platforms, AI helps manage complex workflows and allows organizations to ..

Source: How AI will change the way government works — FCW

Government Contract Bid Protests: Analysis of Legal Processes and Recent Developments – R45080


Generally, a bid protest is a written objection to the conduct of a government agency in acquiring supplies and services for its direct use or benefit. Among other things, the challenged conduct can include violations of law or regulation in the way in which an agency solicits offers for a contract, cancels such a solicitation, awards a contract, or cancels a contract.

Congress authorizes bid protests in three separate forums:
(1) the procuring agency,
(2) the Government Accountability Office (GAO), or
(3) the U.S. Court of Federal Claim s (COFC).

Source: Government Contract Bid Protests: Analysis of Legal Processes and Recent Developments – R45080 (pdf)