Is Trump Driving Women Away From the GOP for Good? | POLITICO Magazine


Trump’s election and performance in office have clearly pushed independent and Democratic women into action, resulting in record numbers of women running for office, and surges of women involved in local political organizing for the first time.

But what about Republican women?

Is it possible that Trump—and the Republican politicians who enable him—are not just alienating left-leaning women, but are permanently damaging the GOP’s female ranks, driving some splintering portion of women away for good?

Source: Is Trump Driving Women Away From the GOP for Good? – POLITICO Magazine

Sprint to midterms is on, as Kavanaugh furor reverberates | TheHill


Democrats remain favorites to take back control of the House of Representatives, but they face an uphill battle in the Senate where the map of contested seats favors the GOP.

The question is whether the confirmation of Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court, despite allegations of sexual assault against him, will spark higher turnout among Democratic-leaning women, and liberal voters generally.

Alternatively, the episode could energize conservatives, in part because they feel Democrats tried to railroad Kavanaugh.

Source: The Memo: Sprint to midterms is on, as Kavanaugh furor reverberates | TheHill

Republicans fear Democratic ‘blue wave’ spreading to once-safe districts | Reuters


“More than the policy, it’s the animosity he is fostering within the country,” Sneed said of Trump.

Voters such as Sneed and Lesser are a significant reason why Democrats now believe that in the Nov. 6 congressional midterm elections, the party can win more than the 23 seats they need to seize control of the U.S. House of Representatives. Some predict Democrats could take as many as 40 seats by flipping districts like Brat’s in Virginia.

Source: Republicans fear Democratic ‘blue wave’ spreading to once-safe districts | Reuters

Trump’s Travel Schedule Shows Focus on Saving the House


President Donald Trump will hold rallies for Republican candidates this month, just as he did throughout summer, but his upcoming itinerary hints at a home-stretch focus: providing a bulwark against a Democratic surge that could imperil his party’s House majority.

Up until now, many of Trump’s rallies have been in states with key Senate races, like Florida — where he traveled Monday — North Dakota, Missouri and Montana. But of four planned rallies in the next six days, two are in states that don’t have a Senate race and two more are in states where the Republican Senate candidates trail by wide margins.

Source: Midterm Elections 2018 News: Jim Cooper, Polls, Marsha Blackburn – Bloomberg

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DHS gets in the weeds on cyber threats to agriculture | FCW


DHS’ Threats to Precision Agriculture report looks at cyber vulnerabilities in embedded and connected technologies that harness remote sensing, global positioning systems and communication systems to generate big data, data analytics and machine learning to manage crops and livestock.

Cyber threats to the agricultural infrastructure are consistent with other connected industries, said DHS, but given farming’s mechanized history, those threats are not well understood or treated seriously enough.

The security threats to precision agriculture range from simple data theft, to market manipulations, destruction of equipment, or even a national security concern, according to the report.

Source: DHS gets in the weeds on cyber threats to agriculture — FCW

DHS sets two-pronged approach to EIS adoption | FCW


The Department of Homeland Security is moving ahead with its plans to leverage the federal government’s $50 billion next-generation telecommunications contract to modernize the DHS’ sprawling IT operations, according to the agency’s CIO.

The first is a straightforward “like-for-like” option to upgrade telecom circuits, and the second is focused on modernizing end points in the agency’s networks using virtualization, Zangardi said at an ACT-IAC panel on Oct. 5. He said he expects Fair Opportunity contract awards in 2019.

Source: DHS sets two-pronged approach to EIS adoption — FCW

Why U.S. sanctions won’t change Iran’s foreign policy | Reuters


The messages from Tehran are stark. On October 1, Iranian forces fired six missiles at Islamic State positions in eastern Syria.

The missile attack, however, was clearly intended to deliver a message beyond the militant holdouts of Islamic State. It was an unequivocal signal to the Trump administration and its allies in the Middle East that Tehran will not change its foreign policy in spite of Washington’s escalation of sanctions – the next round is due in November – after President Donald Trump withdrew from the multilateral 2015 Iran nuclear deal in May.

Source: Commentary: Why U.S. sanctions won’t change Iran’s foreign policy | Reuters

Freshly minted Justice Kavanaugh gets to work at Supreme Court | Reuters


Just three days after he was narrowly confirmed to the U.S. Supreme Court despite facing allegations of sexual assault, Brett Kavanaugh is set to take his seat on the bench on Tuesday morning, solidifying a conservative majority for years to come.

Source: Freshly minted Justice Kavanaugh gets to work at Supreme Court | Reuters

The Taliban’s Fight for Hearts and Minds | Foreign Policy


On paper, Charkh’s surprising success could be interpreted as evidence of how the U.S.-backed administration of President Ashraf Ghani has finally extended a semblance of good governance beyond the capital of Kabul.

But in fact the Afghan government deserves no credit for Charkh; the district is currently governed by the Taliban.

The de facto local authorities, from the mayor to the town’s only judge, come from the Taliban’s ranks, and ordinary bureaucrats, such as teachers and health officials, have been vetted and selected by the insurgency—even though Kabul still pays their salaries.

Source: The Taliban’s Fight for Hearts and Minds – Foreign Policy

Will Donald Trump’s Booming Economy Go Bust Before Working-Class Wallets See the Benefits?


“I will be the greatest ‘jobs president’ God ever created,” Trump pledged during the 2016 campaign. Presidents always exaggerate what they can do to fix an economy and claim more credit than they deserve when times are good.

Other powerful forces—monetary policy, global growth rates, geopolitical shocks—shape the nation’s financial health. Nonetheless, Trump aides say, by many measures, this president is delivering on his promises.

Unemployment is at 3.7 percent, the lowest rate since 1969. Consumer confidence is at an 18-year high. Small business enthusiasm is greater than at any time on record. The stock market is booming.

Source: Will Donald Trump’s Booming Economy Go Bust Before Working-Class Wallets See the Benefits?