This Humongous Fungus Is as Massive as Three Blue Whales | Smithsonian


About 25 years ago, researchers discovered that an Armillaria gallica mushroom near Crystal Falls, Michigan, covered about 91 acres, weighed 110 tons and was about 1,500 years old, setting a new record for the largest organism at the time.

For a new study published on the preprint service bioRxiv, James Anderson, a biologist at the University of Toronto and one of the original discoverers of the fungus, returned to the site and took 245 samples from the mushroom and examined its genome.

The team confirmed that indeed, the entire fungus is just one individual.

Source: This Humongous Fungus Is as Massive as Three Blue Whales | Smart News | Smithsonian

First Evidence of Sleep in Flight


How might a bird sleep in flight without colliding with obstacles or falling from the sky?

One solution would be to only switch off half of the brain at a time, as Rattenborg showed in mallard ducks sleeping in a dangerous situation on land.

When sleeping at the edge of a group, mallards keep one cerebral hemisphere awake and the corresponding eye open and directed away from the other birds, toward a potential threat.

Based on these findings and the fact that dolphins can swim while sleeping unihemispherically, it is commonly assumed that birds also rely on this sort of autopilot to navigate and maintain aerodynamic control during flight.

Source: Max Planck Neuroscience on Nautilus: First Evidence of Sleep in Flight

5G moves forward, one topology at a time | EDN

Although different, the SA (standalone) and NSA (non-standalone) topologies provide service operators with several options for 5G network deployment.

NSA relies on the existing evolved packet core (EPC) or LTE network infrastructure to cost effectively transition to 5G services in a shorter timeframe.

The alternative SA model requires network operators to replace the core network infrastructure, which takes time to deploy. While SA unlocks more 5G features, it does require service operators to replace, purchase, and deploy costly equipment.

NSA utilizes LTE Random Access procedures within the Radio Access Network (RAN) to establish communication and send control information to the 5G gNodeB.

Source: 5G moves forward, one topology at a time | EDN

Using 3D Printing to Blend Biology and Electronics | Design News


Interfacing active devices with biology in 3D printing could impact a variety of fields, from regenerative bioelectronics and smart prosthetics to biomedical devices and human-machine interfaces.

Researchers at the University of Minnesota are exploring 3D printing with biology from the molecular scale of DNA and proteins to the macroscopic scale of tissues and organs.

The goal is to print three-dimensional biological material that is soft and stretchable as well as temperature sensitive.

Source: Using 3D Printing to Blend Biology and Electronics | Design News

Edge Computing Emerges as Megatrend in Automation | Design News


Edge computing technology is quickly becoming a megatrend in industrial control, offering a wide range of benefits for factory automation applications. While the major cloud suppliers are expanding, new communications hardware and software technology are beginning to provide new solutions compared to the previous offerings used in factory automation.

“The most important benefit [compared to existing solutions] will be interoperability—from the device level to the cloud,” John Kowal, director of business development for B&R Industrial Automation, told Design News.

“So it’s very important that communications be standards-based, as you see with OPC UA TSN.”

Source: Edge Computing Emerges as Megatrend in Automation | Design News

What Is Crowdsensing? …And Where Can I Park? | Design News


A group of researchers from Singapore-based Nanyang Technological University (NTU Singapore) think the solution for our parking woes lies in a mobile data-gathering technology called crowdsensing. But parking is just the first step toward using our mobile data to make our day-to-day lives more efficient.

In 2016, Jim Cherian—a senior research engineer at NTU Singapore—conducted a study around ParkGauge, a method of leveraging crowdsensing to capture mobile phone data to track the states of cars in parking garages.

Source: What Is Crowdsensing? …And Where Can I Park? | Design News

Moving Toward an Industrial Internet Connectivity Framework | Design News


IIoT communication has a number of complicating factors: the convergence of IT and OT technologies, along with technical requirements including network latency, jitter, reliability, and availability.

Networks must meet application performance requirements, which can be very different, depending on technical needs of specific systems.

Source: Moving Toward an Industrial Internet Connectivity Framework | Design News

Capacity Media | India’s Trai gives 10 days for subsea access charge consultation


The Indian telecoms regulator has given the industry just 10 days to respond to a consultation about fixing charges to access subsea cable networks.

The Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (Trai) published the request yesterday and wants comments by Monday 29 October, with the deadline for counter comments set for Friday of that week.

The consultation (PDF here) follows a long wrangle between Trai and the industry that started six years ago and was challenged repeatedly in India’s courts.

Source: Capacity Media – global telecoms news, events and community

Capacity Media | Ekinops in talks to buy Alcatel Submarine Networks from Nokia


French network equipment maker Ekinops has approached Nokia about buying its Alcatel Submarine Networks (ASN) unit.

The company – which largely focuses on terrestrial fibre network equipment – confirmed this morning that it has “initiated preliminary discussions” about buying ASN.

Source: Capacity Media – global telecoms news, events and community

60-GHz Wi-Fi Gets a Refresh | EE Times

Qualcomm announced chipsets for the new 802.11ay standard, hoping to nudge 60-GHz Wi-Fi out of the niche that it has occupied for several years. The market situation may provide a cautionary tale for the company and others working on millimeter-wave (mmWave) support for 5G cellular.

A little over half a million 60-GHz chipsets are expected to ship this year, compared to nearly 3.6 billion for all other versions of Wi-Fi, accrding to IHS Markit.

Source: 60-GHz Wi-Fi Gets a Refresh | EE Times