November 4, 2018 – Most-Viewed Bills | Congress.gov

November 4, 2018

1. H.R.5428 [115th] Stand with UK against Russia Violations Act
2. H.R.6 [115th] SUPPORT for Patients and Communities Act
3. H.R.1 [115th] An Act to provide for reconciliation pursuant to titles II and V of the concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal year 2018.
4. H.R.1242 [115th] 400 Years of African-American History Commission Act
5. H.Con.Res.138 [115th] Directing the President pursuant to section 5(c) of the War Powers Resolution to remove United States Armed Forces from hostilities in the Republic of Yemen that have not been authorized by Congress.
6. H.R.38 [115th] Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act of 2017
7. H.R.5515 [115th] John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019
8. S.756 [115th] Save Our Seas Act of 2018
9. S.3021 [115th] America’s Water Infrastructure Act of 2018
10. H.R.302 [115th] FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018

Source: Most-Viewed Bills – Congress.gov Resources –

12 charts that explain the record-breaking year women have had in politics | Vox


Even before the votes are in, the numbers prove it: 2018 is the Year of the Woman.

There’s a feeling in the air that women are becoming more politically active in America. But it’s more than that.

It’s in the hard data. Here are 12 charts and graphs that explain the seismic change in women’s participation in politics that changed 2018 and could have an impact for years to come.

Source: 12 charts that explain the record-breaking year women have had in politics – Vox

Election fallout: What to watch for now | TheHill


Both sides can say they won the 2018 midterm elections.

Democrats regained the House majority for the first time since 2010.

Republicans not only held but added to their majority in the upper chamber.

That split decision won’t likely lead to a lot of deal-making in the new Congress next year, though both House Democrats and Senate Republicans will need to point to accomplishments when their majorities will be up for grabs in 2020.

Here’s what to look for the rest of 2018 and into the new year …

Source: Election fallout: What to watch for now | TheHill

Election Results Point To Even Higher Deficits And Big Budget Wars | @thebudgetguy

The split control of Congress resulting from the 2018 midterm elections is not going to lead to a grand bargain on the budget over the next two years that reduces the federal deficit.

Quite to the contrary, the election results mean that the federal budget will be even more of a hyperpartisan issue than it has been during this Congress and that the deficit is going to increase.

The split control will make it easier for Republicans and Democrats to blame each other for the fiscal sins of the past, the spiking deficits of the future and all of the shutdowns and debt ceiling cliffhangers that will be happening day-to-day.

Source: Election Results Point To Even Higher Deficits And Big Budget Wars – @thebudgetguy

The blue wave ran into Trump’s red wall | TheHill


Democratic hopes for a blue wave in Tuesday’s midterm elections ran into a red wall in the form of the GOP Senate majority that President Trump protected — and ultimately expanded.

The results highlight the polarization of U.S. politics in the Trump era, which increasingly are seen through divides that run along racial, economic and urban-rural lines.

Source: The blue wave ran into Trump’s red wall | TheHill

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How Women Candidates Changed American Politics in 2018 | Time


For many of them, Tuesday night was the culmination in a series of personal transformations: from citizen to gadfly, from gadfly to candidate, from candidate to duly elected representative of the American people.

So when thousands of ordinary American women transformed into leaders, the American government transformed on Tuesday night as well.

Source: How Women Candidates Changed American Politics in 2018 | Time

Democrats Win the House in the Midterm Elections | Time


In Washington, only the House will change hands, as voters elevated the Democrats to serve as a check on the scandal-plagued President and his party. Pelosi, the minority leader and former speaker, intends to again seek the speakership; if she is successful, the 78-year-old veteran pol will become Trump’s principal foil and foe.

Democrats may not have gotten the sweep they yearned for, but they got what matters to Pelosi—power.

Source: Democrats Win the House in the Midterm Elections | Time

DISA handed off its $8 billion cloud buy to GSA. Now what? | FCW


The Defense Information Systems Agency is looking to become an enterprise technology operator for more than the Defense Department.

“Nobody in industry or across the government scales to the size we do,” agency head Vice Adm. Nancy Norton said at a media briefing at DISA’s industry day Nov. 5 outside of Baltimore. “We have the expertise to learn, deploy and operate enterprise scales that other people typically don’t, and that comes with the great opportunity to maximize those efficiencies.”

And the Pentagon’s $8 billion Defense Enterprise Office Solutions buy is poised to be an example of that scalability beyond the Defense Department.

The DEOS procurement was shifted to the General Services Administration’s Schedule 70 vehicle, with DISA doing the implementation and deployment.

Source: DISA handed off its $8 billion cloud buy to GSA. Now what? — FCW

The fight goes on: Election Night 2018


Even before the West Coast polls closed all major media outlets projected Democrats would win control of the House of Representatives—and they did.

Buoyed by expected strength in states like Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, and Florida, and unexpected strength in some western New York districts and some southwest Texas districts, Democrats won a solid majority.

In addition, as expected, the Democratic vote was strongest in suburbs across the country and the party’s careful recruitment of women and veteran candidates seemed to be paying off as the evening went on.

As a result, the new Democratic caucus in the House will have more women than ever before.

Source: The fight goes on: Election Night 2018

Next up? Starting gun sounds on 2020 White House race | Reuters


Tuesday’s elections sounded the starting gun for a long, crowded, expensive and no doubt dramatic race for the presidency.

Democrats, riding a wave of momentum from their gains in the U.S. House of Representatives, enter the presidential cycle without a clear front-runner for the first time since the start of the 2004 campaign.

Source: Next up? Starting gun sounds on 2020 White House race | Reuters