The “Jewish American Princess” is our most complex Jewish stereotype | Vox


The Jewish American Princess, or JAP, embodies both an attitude and a style of dressing.

The archetype was forged in the mid-1950s, in concert with the Jewish-American middle-class ascent. Where it came from, nobody knows. The JAP has survived through an alliance with pop culture — showing her face sporadically in books, in music, and onscreen, even up to the present.

The JAP is neither Jewish nor American alone.

Source: The “Jewish American Princess” is our most complex Jewish stereotype – Vox

CRISPR babies: is this the start of a terrifying new chapter in gene editing? | Vox


The past several years in science have unleashed the CRISPR revolution. CRISPR/Cas9 — or CRISPR, as it’s known — is a tool that allows researchers to attempt to control which genes get expressed in plants, animals, and even humans; to delete undesirable traits and, potentially, add desirable traits; and to do all this more quickly, and with more precision, than ever before. (You can read about how CRISPR works here.)

He, a Stanford-trained associate professor at the Southern University of Science and Technology in Shenzhen, China, was not well known in the field of CRISPR editing.

But he’s claiming a major first: to have used the gene editing technology CRISPR to tweak the DNA of human embryos during in vitro fertilization.

Source: CRISPR babies: is this the start of a terrifying new chapter in gene editing? – Vox

COP24: Indonesia is falling behind on meeting its climate targets | Vox


.. flying well below the radar in all of this is Indonesia, currently the world’s fifth biggest emitter of greenhouse gases, which come mainly from land use, land use change, and forestry.

Today Indonesia stands out for how little it has done to implement policies that would enable it to meet its commitment under the Paris agreement: cutting emissions from deforestation by 29 percent below business-as-usual projections by 2030.

Source: COP24: Indonesia is falling behind on meeting its climate targets – Vox

One part of the U.S. yield curve just inverted; what does that mean? | Reuters


Part of the U.S. Treasury yield curve “inverted” this week, setting off debate over whether it is delivering a classic signal of oncoming recession or it has just developed a short-term kink that can be explained away by technical reasons.

To be sure, this week’s inversion has been limited so far to the front-end of the yield curve rather than more closely studied recession harbingers such as the gap between 2-year and 10-year note yields. In the current instance, yields on 5-year notes US5YT=RR have dropped below those on both 2-year US2YT=RR and 3-year US3YT=RR securities.

Still, in December 2005, for instance, a comparable inversion at the front of the curve was followed shortly afterward by an inversion between 2- and 10-year yields. The Great Recession began in December 2007.

Source: One part of the U.S. yield curve just inverted; what does that mean? | Reuters

South African blackouts mask $30 bln power problem | Reuters


Eskom’s demise over the past decade has been remarkable. A central pillar of the apartheid economy, it still supplies 90 percent of South Africa’s power.

But a failure to build new plants after the end of white rule has cost it dear. As it has rushed to catch up, staff numbers have ballooned to 48,000 from 32,000 10 years ago.

Corruption and mismanagement haven’t helped. Meanwhile price hikes in a sluggish economy have caused sales to stagnate.

Debt has risen tenfold to $30 billion since 2007.

Source: Breakingviews – South African blackouts mask $30 bln power problem | Reuters

Fed up with Facebook, U.S. fund managers look for alternatives | Reuters


Concerns about the social media giant’s declining profit margins and battered reputation have prompted 93 U.S. mutual funds to completely sell out of their positions in the company so far this year, exacerbating a roughly 35 percent decline in Facebook’s share price from its highs, according to Refinitiv’s Lipper research service.

The selling by fund firms including Fidelity Investments, The Hartford and Putnam Investments combined for a total of nearly 12 million shares, and came amid similar moves to liquidate positions in the company by prominent growth-focused hedge funds. Jana Partners and Third Point LLC, for instance, together sold nearly 3.7 million Facebook shares in the third quarter, according to securities filings.

Source: Fed up with Facebook, U.S. fund managers look for alternatives | Reuters

Top Huawei executive arrested on U.S. request, clouding China trade truce | Reuters


The shock arrest of Meng Wanzhou, 46, who is Huawei Technologies Co Ltd’s chief financial officer, raises fresh doubts over a 90-day truce on trade struck between Presidents Donald Trump and Xi Jinping on Saturday – the day she was detained.

Her arrest, revealed late on Wednesday by Canadian authorities, is related to U.S. sanctions, a person familiar with the matter said. Reuters was unable to determine the precise nature of the possible violations.

Source: Top Huawei executive arrested on U.S. request, clouding China trade truce | Reuters

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Digital Divide Is Wider Than We Think, Study Says | The New York Times


Fast internet service is crucial to the modern economy, and closing the digital divide is seen as a step toward shrinking the persistent gaps in economic opportunity, educational achievement and health outcomes in America. In some areas with spotty or no service, children do their homework in Wi-Fi-equipped buses or fast-food restaurants, small businesses drive to internet hot spots to send sales pitches and medical records are transported by hand on thumb-drive memory sticks.

Accurate measurements on the reach of broadband matter because the government’s statistics are used to guide policy and channel federal funding for underserved areas.

Source: Digital Divide Is Wider Than We Think, Study Says – The New York Times

Trump has shifted the trade paradigm — for the worse | TheHill

USMCA’s emphasis is on “balanced” and “reciprocal” trade, not free trade or open markets. The U.S. is clearly targeting the trade deficit.

Gone is the old paradigm’s emphasis on creating opportunities for U.S. commerce, with companies free to choose how best to allocate production and trade flows.

The old paradigm held an implicit belief that what was good for American business was good for America and American workers. The “New Model Trade Agreement” seeks to rein in the tendency for U.S. companies (who have morphed into multinational corporations) to outsource production to countries with low wage costs.

What’s good for General Motors is not always good for American workers, and the New Model Trade Agreement serves as a counterweight to U.S. companies that outsource and downsize U.S. production.

Source: Trump has shifted the trade paradigm — for the worse | TheHill

Senate panel delays Trump’s judicial picks amid Mueller standoff | TheHill

The Senate Judiciary Committee is postponing votes on nearly two dozen judiciary nominees for the second time in as many weeks.

The decision to punt the business meeting again comes as Republicans are locked in a stalemate with Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.) over legislation protecting special counsel Robert Mueller.

Source: Senate panel delays Trump’s judicial picks amid Mueller standoff | TheHill