First Facebook investigation to be completed by summer: regulator | Reuters


Facebook’s lead regulator in the European Union expects to conclude the first of seven investigations into the company’s use of personal data this summer and the remainder by the end of the year, Ireland’s Data Protection Commissioner said on Thursday.

The commissioner’s office last year launched three investigations into aspects of a massive cyber attack in which hackers stole login codes that allowed them to access nearly 50 million Facebook accounts, including 3 million in Europe.

Source: First Facebook investigation to be completed by summer: regulator | Reuters

U.N. says Israel should face justice for Gaza protest killings | Reuters


United Nations investigators said on Thursday Israeli security forces may have committed war crimes and crimes against humanity in killing 189 Palestinians and wounding more than 6,100 at weekly protests in Gaza last year.

The independent panel said it had confidential information about those it believes to be responsible for the killings, including Israeli army snipers and commanders, and called on Israel to prosecute them.

Source: U.N. says Israel should face justice for Gaza protest killings | Reuters

‘Sometimes you have to walk’: Trump scraps North Korea summit deal | Reuters


U.S. President Donald Trump said he had walked away from a nuclear deal at his summit with Kim Jong Un in Vietnam on Thursday because of unacceptable demands from the North Korean leader to lift punishing U.S.-led sanctions.

“It was all about the sanctions,” Trump said at a news conference after the talks were cut short. “Basically, they wanted the sanctions lifted in their entirety, and we couldn’t do that.”

Source: ‘Sometimes you have to walk’: Trump scraps North Korea summit deal | Reuters

Related>

Senate panel wants Chinese-funded institutes to change or leave U.S. | Reuters


China has provided over $158 million to U.S. schools for Confucius Institutes to promote Chinese culture, U.S. Senate investigators said on Wednesday, releasing a report saying the centers have acted as tightly controlled propaganda arms for Beijing and should be changed – or shut down.

The Senate’s Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations spent eight months investigating the Confucius Institutes, which were created in 2004 to promote Chinese language and culture at schools and universities around the world.

Source: Senate panel wants Chinese-funded institutes to change or leave U.S. | Reuters

Impeachment decoded: A look at how to remove a U.S. president | Reuters


Investigations involving President Donald Trump by Special Counsel Robert Mueller and U.S. lawmakers have raised the possibility that Congress could seek to remove him from office using the impeachment process set out in the Constitution.

The Constitution assigns different but equally crucial roles to the 435-seat House of Representatives and 100-member Senate.

The House acts as the accuser – voting on whether to bring specific charges – and the Senate then conducts a trial with House members acting as prosecutors and the individual senators serving as jurors.

Source: Impeachment decoded: A look at how to remove a U.S. president | Reuters

Who is Allen Weisselberg – Trump’s Accountant Is Key to the President’s Finances.

During Michael Cohen’s testimony before a House committee on Wednesday, he mentioned one man who could light the way down Donald Trump’s money trail: Allen Weisselberg, the Trump family’s longtime accountant and the Trump Organization’s chief financial officer.

“Allen is the one guy who knows everything,” a former high-ranking Trump Organization executive told the New Yorker in 2016. “He’ll never talk to you.” But thanks to an immunity deal, Weisselberg could finally be talking.

Source: Who is Allen Weisselberg – Trump’s Accountant Is Key to the President’s Finances.

Top moments from the Cohen hearing | TheHill


Michael Cohen’s testimony to Congress on Wednesday gripped the nation as he unloaded a number of major accusations against his former boss, President Trump.

In one of the most dramatic hearings in years, Cohen expressed remorse for working for Trump, clashed with Republican lawmakers and provided more clues to the ongoing investigations of the White House.

Here are some of the biggest moments from Wednesday’s riveting hearing …

Source: Top moments from the Cohen hearing | TheHill

Related>

BAE to Vie for Cyber Engineering Task Orders Under $898M Navy IDIQ | ExecutiveBiz

nullBAE Systems has landed a spot on a potential $898M indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract from the U.S. Navy to offer cyber engineering services to naval, joint and national agencies.

“This award creates new opportunities for us to showcase our expertise in cyber threat exploitation and analysis, computer network defense, and security-focused systems engineering,” Kris Busch, vice president of BAE’s integrated defense solutions business, said in a statement released Wednesday.

He added the company plans to introduce artificial intelligence, advanced analytics and machine learning tools intended to help increase U.S. defenses against multiple threats.

BAE is among the 10 contractors selected for the multiple-award contract with a $962M ceiling value over seven and a half years.

Source: BAE to Vie for Cyber Engineering Task Orders Under $898M Navy IDIQ; Kris Busch Quoted | ExecutiveBiz

Michael Cohen testifies to ‘high crimes and misdemeanors,’ but will it matter?

null
Today Michael Cohen, the former personal lawyer to President Donald Trump, testified before the House Oversight Committee. His testimony offered explosive allegations and included documentation that Cohen argues corroborates his claims. However, there is one big political question coming out of today’s testimony: did it change Republican minds about the president?

Start with the fact that Michael Cohen’s veracity is in the eye of the beholder.

Source: Michael Cohen testifies to ‘high crimes and misdemeanors,’ but will it matter?

Detecting agile BS | FCW


The problem is that these days everyone, especially vendors, is describing what they do as agile, even when, as is often the case, it actually resembles traditional practices — often referred to as “agilefall.”

If only a tiny proportion of activities characterized as agile actually have the characteristics of agile, this is a recipe for the failure of the movement to come close to realizing its potential for government. That would be a shame.

The Agile Government Leaders post called readers’ attention to a DOD document from last October, which I hadn’t seen before, called Detecting Agile BS.

Source: Detecting agile BS — FCW