Growth In Electric Buses Is the Key To Electrification | Design News


Electric buses are the best way for electric vehicles (EVs) to deliver on their promise of dramatically improving air quality and reducing CO2 emissions.

According to Bloomberg, production of electric buses will advance more rapidly than electric cars, spurred on by lower ownership and operating costs in addition to reduced emissions. There are already more than 300,000 electric buses on the road worldwide, with 99% of them deployed in China. Bloomberg expects 80% of the world’s bus fleet to be electric by 2040.

Source: Growth In Electric Buses Is the Key To Electrification | Design News

Why Cybersecurity Demands Are Outpacing Mitigation Efforts | Design News

On January 28, the U.S. Department of Defense released a report from the Pentagon’s combat testing office announcing that the U.S. military’s cybersecurity capabilities “aren’t advancing fast enough to stay ahead of the ‘onslaught of multipronged’ attacks envisioned by adversaries.”

On January 29, news broke of a bug in Apple’s Facetime software, allowing users to access someone else’s microphone without their consent.

Both of these organizations, leading their respective industries, within a week have demonstrated the overwhelming challenge of software security.

Software teams in 2019 are building more complex projects, with more distributed teams, in a more competitive technical landscape. On top of this immense challenge, teams have to mitigate against the risk of cyberattacks, in both their new software and in their existing code.

To date, most companies have shown that they don’t have a reliable practice in place.

Source: Why Cybersecurity Demands Are Outpacing Mitigation Efforts | Design News

Turning Your Manufacturing Business Into a Platform Organization


Giant platform organizations increasingly own the digital infrastructure on which everyone else trades.

The digital titans—Amazon, Google, and Facebook in the West and Alibaba, Tencent and Baidu in the East—publicly state that they want to take a cut of all our digital commerce.

Increasingly, CEOs fear the day when one of them enters their market.

We often see platform organizations as the way digital natives such as Amazon, Alibaba, and Uber capture share in retail, financial services, health, hospitality and transport. But using the Internet of Things (IoT), other digital natives (e.g., Thingworx) are also capturing the support functions of manufacturing in its 22 sectors from chemicals, automotive and machinery through food, plastics and petroleum to computers, medical, textiles and furniture.

Why is the platform business model increasingly necessary in manufacturing?

Source: Turning Your Manufacturing Business Into a Platform Organization

To Service, or Not to Service—Investigating Robots-as-a-Service


According to the Future of Manufacturing report, a third of manufacturers generate profit through servitization. Robots as a Service (RaaS), the business model for deploying robotic automation on lease, is also beginning to gain traction. Let’s examine the potential of RaaS, when compared to traditional robot purchasing.

RaaS describes the purchase of industrial robots by leasing robotic devices as needed, as opposed to the traditional method of buying a robot outright. Like many other servitization models, the concept boasts reduced upfront costs and the advantage of ongoing maintenance.

But, why fix a model that isn’t broken?

Source: To Service, or Not to Service—Investigating Robots-as-a-Service

New Process Turns Desalination Byproduct into Beneficial Chemicals


A second look at existing desalination processes could yield a bevy of useful chemicals from a highly concentrated brine byproduct that otherwise would be dumped as waste.

Researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have developed a new method to convert desalination waste material into useful chemicals, including chemicals like sodium hydroxide that can even further enhance the efficiency of the desalination process.

More than 27 billion gallons of water a day are produced across the globe from desalination, producing nearly an equal amount of concentrated brine that is generally disposed by dumping it back into the sea—a process that requires expensive pumping systems that must be carefully managed to eliminate the risk to the marine ecosystem.

Source: New Process Turns Desalination Byproduct into Beneficial Chemicals

New White House Science Advisor Outlines His Goals at AAAS Annual Meeting


After filling a position that was previously vacant for more than two years, the new director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) said he is ready to enact changes that will push the U.S. to new frontiers in science.

During the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) annual meeting on Feb. 15, Kelvin Droegemeier, PhD, made his first public speech since the Senate confirmed him on January 2, explaining his approach to his new job.

“I would like to propose three pillars for this bold era,” he said during the speech at the event in Washington D.C. “The first pillar is to understand the R&D ecosystem in a new context and undertake long-term planning looking farther down the road and the future.

Source: New White House Science Advisor Outlines His Goals at AAAS Annual Meeting

Taming the AI Beast to Tackle Cyber-Threats | EEWeb Community


The use of artificial intelligence and machine learning to both promote cyberattacks and mitigate against them means that this is truly an interesting time in the world of cybersecurity

On a global scale, enterprises spend approximately $100 billion annually on security products. With corporate espionage and business sabotages becoming more sophisticated, security is turning out to be one of the crucial factors in deciding enterprise outcomes.

As a result, CISO organizations now tend to employ more than 30 security products in their working environments and associated systems. Even with this huge number of risk counters, analysts and researchers confess that cyber-threat mitigation is never 100% efficient.

With the advent of self-thinking machines and applications including machine learning (ML) and deep learning (DL), security is, more than ever, at stake.

Source: Taming the AI Beast to Tackle Cyber-Threats | EEWeb Community

March 2019 – Satellite Servicing Becomes an Actual Market | Via Satellite


It is no longer sustainable for operators to throw away depleted spacecraft and build replacements to fill in the gaps. It’s difficult enough operating a satellite at a fixed position in Geostationary Orbit (GEO).

Prime real estate spots are limited, prone to physical disturbance and interference, and heavily regulated.

The main reason that operators retire dozens of satellites to graveyard orbits every year is because they simply run out of fuel. To state the obvious, the ability to re-fuel in orbit saves an incredible amount of time and money.

What’s not so obvious is what operators would do with their re-purposed assets. Are recycled satellites merely gap-fillers, revenue generators, or both?

In one of the biggest satellite manufacturing acquisitions in recent memory, Northrop Grumman bought Orbital ATK last year and inherited its state-of-the-art satellite servicing capabilities.

Source: March 2019 – Satellite Servicing Becomes an Actual Market | Via Satellite

SpaceX Wants FCC Approval of 1 Million Satellite Broadband Earth Stations | Via Satellite

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SpaceX is looking to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) for a blanket license to operate up to 1 million fixed earth stations for its Starlink satellite broadband constellation.

The application was filed under SpaceX Services, a SpaceX sister company. GeekWire reported on Friday that the application was published by FCC.report.

Source: SpaceX Wants FCC Approval of 1 Million Satellite Broadband Earth Stations – Via Satellite –

March 2019 – Satellite Manufacturing in a State of Transition | Via Satellite


The requirements from customers are always ‘better, cheaper, faster,” says Andreas Lindenthal, chief operating officer and member of the board at Bremen, Germany-based, satellite manufacturer OHB.

“For some of our customers — mainly the communication operators — the pressure in the market has increased significantly, therefore, they are not looking just for incremental improvements in this area; they are looking for disruption.”

What exactly that disruption might be is, however, somewhat uncertain.

In addition to high-speed technology development, which is forcing operators to rethink traditional approaches based around large, long-lived Geostationary Orbit (GEO) satellites, there is a changing economic environment in which business cases are no longer as clear and stable as they once might have been.

The operators need to be able to respond quickly and therefore require satellites to be delivered faster than what would have satisfied them ten years ago.

“Satellite operators are telling us that they don’t have such a long term, stable unchanged business cases for 15 years, 20 years of satellite operation anymore,” says Lindenthal.

Source: March 2019 – Satellite Manufacturing in a State of Transition | Via Satellite